(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Town Report"

< 



rsp^":-:f j 



nK^.public.library. mass. 




lincoht public Htfcrarp 



June 1978 



c.2 




Lincoln, (^Massachusetts 
financial Section and Wfirrantjfor the 
ipy8 Annual Town Meeting 



1492 7b 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

1977 



Cover Design - We are arateful to 

Harold A. Levey, Jr. , 
who took the picture 
shown on the cover, 
and to the DeCordova 
Museum staff for their 
help in desianing the 
cover. 



THE FINANCIAL SITUATION IN A NUTSHELL 



Taxes may go up significantly. 

Budget is only up 4. 1% - less than cost of living 
increase. Ordinarily, after rise in assessed valuation, 
taxes should go ud very little. However, lower free cash 
position, which we can't do anything about, and substantial 
warrant article requests for money, mean taxes will go up a 
great deal - 10% or more - up $7.30 per thousand. 

This is too high . Can we do something about this? 
Most likely opportunity - voting less than the total amount 
of warrant articles. Difficult to do because of conflict 
in our priorities . No consensus on how they should be 
balanced. Easy to try to do everything. Hard to make de- 
cisions. 

Warrant article requests total $264,000. To keep tax 
increase reasonable, at least $150,000 will have to be elim- 
inated. 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



In order to focus intelligently on the financial decisions which 
are likely to be made at the next Town Meeting, some grasp of two major 
elements which bear on these decisions is important. 

The first element has often been mentioned in Finance Committee 
reports, namely, the difficult task of balancing, or integrating, what 
appear to be clear priorities which often seem to be in conflict with 
one another. This is what we meant when we said in our 1977 report 
to the Town : 

"Some have wondered, in the face of the inevitable exclusionary 
consequences of open space acquisition, whether it is right for 
us to add to our store of conservation land. Others ask much 
the same question out of concern for making Lincoln a comforta- 
ble place for mixed income levels. Still others ask this 
question out of alarm that the increasing public use of our open 
lands will either alter the character of the Town or require sub- 
stantial expenditures for maintaining our open space and policing 
the use of our lands by outsiders. Finally, some have expressed 
the view that the answer to providing quality education in an en- 
vironment of declining enrollment and rising costs is to allow 
the Town to develop more rapidly...." 

Thus, in more concrete terms, we commented in our land development 
mailing to the Town that the benefits of our land use choices could: 

"1. See our tax rate drop .... 

2. Fund a variety of moderate income housing proposals .... 

3. Fund a variety of other unmet needs .... 

4. (Enable us) to acquire some of . . . the open space 
available without any negative economic impact ...." 

The element of our conflicting priorities is dramatically reflected 
in our prospects for a significant tax increase next year, for, in spite 
of the fact that the Town's budget is only up 4.1% or $184,284, we expect 
that our present tax rate of $69.20 could increase by $7.30 to $76.50 - 
an increase of better than 10%. We feel that this increase is entirely 
too high given present economic circumstances. 

If the Town agrees, and chooses to react to this situation, the sec- 
ond fundamental element which needs to be understood relates to the factors 
which can influence our tax rate and which ones are causing the dramatic 
rise we are forecasting. Tax increases are caused by year to year fluct- 
uations resulting in: 

1. Increases in the Town's operating budget 

2. Increases in the amounts voted by the Town for special articles 
over the level voted last year. 



3. Increases in the assessments levied against the Town in the 
cherry sheet 

4. Decreases in the level of aid provided by the State 

5. Decreases in the level of funds appropriated from "free cash" 
i.e., excess funds from unexpended appropriations, the accumu- 
lation Of miscellaneous sources of funds received by the Town, 
etc. 

6. Decreases in other sources of funds received by the Town 



Sources of next year's anticipated tax increase . 

At the moment it appears that the sources of next year's tax increase 

will be: 



Source 

1. Increase in Town budget 

2. Increase in warrant articles 

3. Increases in assessments 

4. Decreases in aid 

5. Decreases in free cash appro- 

priations 

6. Decrease in other sources of 

funds 

Total factors contributing to 
tax rate increase 

Less impact of higher 

assessed valuation 1 . 54 

Equals forecasted tax rise $7.30 



Khere we can impact tax rate if we want to . 

Obviously, there is not much we can do to affect the amounts of State 
aid, and assessments or other sources of funds. Those items are very hard 
to predict, largely dependent as they are on the caprices of Beacon Hill. 
Indications are this year that there may be some increases in aid, but we 
envision assessments increasing as well. Under the circumstances, the 
best guess that we can make is that the net effect of aid and assessments 
will be about the same as last year. The essential fact is that they are 
beyond our control. 

Free cash, on the other hand, is within our control - that is, if the 
free cash is there to begin with. It has been our normal practice to ap- 
propriate all but about $50,000 in free cash to reduce the tax rate. Last 
year we appropriated $230,000 out of available funds. Unfortunately, sub- 
stantial appropriations from free cash were made last year as a result of 
special town meetings, reducing the funds available this year. Further, 
heavy snow removal costs this year have resulted in our exceeding our snow 





Tax Rate 


% of 


Amount 


Impact 


Increase 


$184,000 


$3.28 


37% 


174,000 


3.11 


35% 


-0- 


-0- 


-- 


-0- 


-0- 


-- 


130,000 


2.32 


27% 


7,000 


.13 


1% 


$495,000 


$8.84 


100% 



o 


00 


to 


lo 


lo 


a 


r^ 


at 


CM 


ts 


co 


r^ 


to 


to 


•n- 



1 — 


<r 




> 


1- 


>_ 


1— < 


— i 


CQ 


00 


t— i 




~n 


I- 


X 


LiJ 


UJ 


CT 




Q 



o o 

CM to 



Tf o 

\D r-l 



LO 
LO 


LO 

Ot 


o 


LO 
LO 

o 


o 

o 

LO 


o 
o 


00 
LO 

o 


o 

CM 


o 

vO 

at 


LO 
CM 


o 

LO 


00 

to 

CM 


CM 

o 


o 

o 
o 


00 

to 


LO 
LO 
CM 

■be- 


o 


LO 


o 

CM 

to 


CM 


o 

00 
00 


at 
to 


at 


CM 

to 


LO 

to 


r-- 


vD 
CM 


00 
CM 


LO 











>^ 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


a 


r-~ 


LO 


o 


LO 


i 








r* 


00 


r~- 


LO 


r- 






, — 1 


O) 


**i 




k>e- 


«H 






C.) 


o 






~C 



OtOOOCMOOCMOOtO 



to 

LO 

co 


CM 

r-. 


o 

CM 


o 

LO 


o 
o 

LO 


O 

at 


mD 

to 

00 


00 


LO 
00 
CM 


o 

LO 
00 


o 

LO 

mD 


at 

•** 

LO 


O 
00 
CM 


o 

o 
o 


CM 

•o 

CM 

-be- 


CM 
Ot 

■*t 


CM 

LO 


to 
to 


CM 


NO 

00 

.-1 


O 


to 

00 




LO 

to 


r-- 


o 

CM 


O 

at 

CM 


LO 




•H 




zi a> 


m rt 




fH (30 


rt S 




&0T3 
O 3 


V) uS 




^ -O 


C 




a, 


o oo 




at 


•H C 


(H 


£ r- 


4-> -H 


CD 


O 1 


rt +-> 


O 


C 00 


•H C 


•H 


r- 


^ aS 


LW 


4-> a> 


ftr^ 


<4-l 


C ^H 


O CL, 


O 


<i> 


(H 




10 0) 


a, v 


DO 


CD X 


&, <U 


o 


V< 4-> 


K) U 


a 


a, 


E- 




<D c 


o 


i 


$H -H 








O 


c 


t/l 13 


•H 4-> 


o 


a> co 


4-> £ 


•H 


.-1 4J 


- 0) 


4-> 


o rt 


< 1 


rt 


•H ^1 




4-> 


4-> O 


^ J-l 


•H 


u a, 


rt <L> 


c 


rt ?h 


■H > 


rt 


o 


o o 


en 


.-l o 


a> u 




rt C 


a 


us- 


•H -H 


CO ^H 




O 


a 


X 


0) (1) 


</> Ly 


4-> 


Oh 5-< 


a) a> 




v> ai 


T3 C 


rt 




3 a> 


<u 


cu x: 


r-l u 


ac 


t/> o 


o 




<D -H 


c 




.C X 






H 2 



removal budget by at least $35,000. Under the circumstances, we do not 
feel it possible to utilize more than $100,000 this year to offset other 
factors contributing to the forecasted increase in the tax rate. 

This leaves the budget and special warrant articles. The remainder 
of this report deals with these two areas. 



The Budget . 

The budget, though not all areas within it, is up 4.1%. We feel 
that, in the absence of major cutbacks in services, or the introduction of 
major efficiencies in the productivity of Town employees, an increase of 
this order of magnitude is in keeping with the fundamental forces affecting 
the economy since we last reported to you. Just about everything the Town 
purchases costs more, and it is also to be expected that the salaries of 
Town employees increase by reasonable amounts. 

What about major decreases in services? 

Although we are well aware that some may disagree, we see no Town con- 
sensus for a cut in the level of Town services for the sake of economy. In- 
deed, new programs and the expansion of old programs seem to imply the Town 
is asking for more, not less. Further fuel is added to the notion of 
"more, not less" by the growing complexity of government and the continuing 
tendency of the State to mandate programs for the cities and towns. 

If indeed this is the reality of our Town, then impacting efficiency 
and productivity would seem to be the only answer. This implies changes 
in the way we do things, and running the risk that, in spite of the best in- 
tentions, not all change is productive. Since we feel that, on the whole, 
the Town is well run, and that employees are committed and dedicated, we 
are also conscious of the fact that beyond a point, or at too fast a rate, 
change can destroy commitment and dedication. Thus, in the short run, it 
seems unlikely that the best answer to this year's tax dilemma lies in the 
form of forcing change by taking a meat axe to the budget. 

If one wanted to look to the budget for part of the answer, perhaps the 
place to begin is by taking a longer view of our priorities as they reflect 
themselves over a span of years, as we have done in Exhibit 1 on page 3. 
Certain areas of expenditure are consuming more of the budgetary pie and 
certain areas less. This to us raises the questions: 

1. Does the budget reflect an appropriate decline in areas where 
priorities have apparently declined? 

2. Does the budget reflect increases which are in line with the 
real sense of priorities of the Town, or is the increase in ex- 
penditure an indication of a need for more control over ex- 
penditure? 

With this in mind, we would like to comment on our expenditures in 
several areas, either because of their rate of increase this year, or be- 
cause they represent either a significantly higher or lower share of Town 



expenditures over those of seven years ago. 

General Government . The share of the total Town budget consumed by 
General Government has increased from 4.4% to 5.7% over the last seven 
years. This not only reflects the growing complexity of government but 
new initiatives such as the conservation land management program as well. 
The increase in this year's budget (2.8%) is lower than the total budget 
and our feeling is that expenditures are well controlled. 

Public Safety . The share of the total Town budget consumed by Pub- 
lic Safety expenditures has risen from 8.6% to 10.6% over the last seven 
years. This is the largest increase of the major categories in the budget 
which are under our control. Our feeling is that this reflects not only 
a real increase in priority, but that the more rapid rate of increase in 
expenditures than other areas will continue for the foreseeable future, 
largely as a result of the new State imposed ambulance requirements. 

Health 5 Sanitation . The major reason for the sizable percentage 
increase (15%) in health and sanitation expenditures this year is the re- 
sult of more rigorous inspection requirements of the sanitation capabilities 
of land to be developed. These requirements are largely State mandated. 
An increase in fees charged for this service is expected to offset the 
added cost to the Town. 

Schools . As might be expected, the share of the total Town budget 
consumed by the elementary schools has declined in view of the dramatic 
drop in enrollment experienced over the past seven years, although, in 
spite of declining enrollment, the -school budget continues to climb. The 
School Committee intends to put several options before the Town which could 
result in moderate to significant declines in cost, if adopted. Since 
these options have not been widely discussed in the community, no impact 
will occur in this year's budget. Although, by historical standards, the 
increase in the elementary school budget is low, the Finance Committee feels 
that sufficient flexibility exists in the budget this year to obviate any 
increase at all in the budget. We would like to see the school budget re- 
duced by at least $15,000. 

The Regional High School budget is up approximately 6%, while our 
assessment is up over 10%. The reason for the higher increase in assess- 
ment is due to year to year adjustments in the apportionment of the Region- 
al budget between Sudbury and Lincoln reflecting actual student counts in 
relation to estimates and receipt of State aid in relation to estimated re- 
imbursements . 

Library . The rate of growth in Library expenditures has slowed down, 
although this year the rate of increase is higher than we might ordinarily 
expect due to the purchase of a new copying machine and the inclusion of 
maintenance funds in the budget, which previously had been the subject of 
special articles. The age and condition of the building are such that a 
program of more intensive ongoing maintenance would seem more efficient than 
periodically facing the large capital expenditures we have experienced in 
recent years. 



Unclassified. The unclassified portion of the budget is the sector 
of the budget which has risen the most (250%) over the last seven years. 
By recent standards, this year's increase of 6.3% is relatively moderate. 
The bulk of the unclassified sector of the budget consists of hospitaliza- 
tion and property and indemnity insurance, as well as pension costs. These 
expenses are largely uncontrollable over the short run and have risen dram- 
atically over the period of time involved. 



Warrant Articles . 

This year, in response to many requests from citizens, the Finance Com- 
mittee has asked the proponents of warrant articles to indicate the amount 
of money involved as early as possible after filing warrant articles. While 
the amounts below are only tentative, it does appear that, if all warrant 
articles submitted are approved by the Town, we will exceed the amount voted 
last year by about $150,000. This is a major factor in the high anticipated 
tax rate increase we are forecasting. 

We do not recommend that all warrant articles be approved, as we feel 
that the only way we can prevent a sizable tax increase is to back burner 
some articles involving significant amounts of money. The fact that these 
warrant articles exist testifies to the point that some citizens feel these 
are significant unmet needs in Town. We do not take issue with this, but, 
at a time when the rate of inflation is expected to increase, we feel many 
taxpayers will be severely impacted by a rapidly increasing tax burden. 
Accordingly we will recommend against passage of some articles at Town Meet- 
ing, after seeking input from the Town at our budget hearing. 

Below is a list of the warrant articles involving appropriation of 
funds, and an estimate of their impact as best as we are able to make it at 
this juncture: 

Article Description Amount 

15 Town Hall Repairs 

16 Town Barn Repairs 
19 Public Works Equipment 

23 New Fire Engine 

24 Septage Disposal Committee 

25 Lewis Street Land Purchase 

28 New Tennis Courts 

29 Pierce Park Improvements 10,000 
9 Lease Development Rights ) 

10 Purchase Land - Sandy Pond Trust ) 

11 Purchase Land - Sandy Pond Trust ) 6,000' 

12 Purchase Land - Umbrello ) 

13 Purchase Land - Snider ) 

17 Fire § Police Station Repairs 

18 Purchase Land (Cemeteries) 

31 Bicycle Path - Sandy Pond Road 

32 Bicycle Path - Concord Road 

33 Unemployment Insurance 

Total $264,200 



; 10 


,000 


15 


,000 


15 


,000 


30 


,000 


1 


,200 


3 


,000 


24, 


,000 



4 


,000 


15 


,000' 


87 


,000 


15 


,000 


29, 


,000 



The impact of these articles this year will probably be 
slight, only involving interest costs on short term bor- 
rowings for a portion of the year. If some of the land 
is not acquired this year, the development rights may be 
acquired. While difficult to estimate, at present it 
does not appear that sizable expenditures will be needed, 
but, of course, the purchase of these lands will add sig- 
nificantly to our debt servicing costs in future years. 

An additional $14,000 will be taken from available cemetery 
funds . 



Arthur L. Coburn, III 

Edward S. Dewey 

Charlotte Friel 

Lawrence B. Thompson 

William G. Williams, Jr., Chairman 

THE LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 



EXHIBIT 2 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

TAX RATE 

1978-79 ESTIMATE VS. 1977-78 ACTUAL 



Town Budget (Warrant Article 5) 
Other warrant articles 
Total Warrant Appropriations 

Funds available to offset against appropriations 

1) Free cash - 7/1/77 and 7/1/76 

2) Revenue sharing and anti-recession funds 

3) Met co funds 

4) Receipts in lieu of taxes 

5) Other 



Total warrant articles to be paid by taxation $4,607,000 



County, MBTA and State assessments: 

1) County 

2) MBTA 

3) State 



Total expenditures to be raised by taxation 

Other sources of funds: 

1) State and local aid funds 

2) Motor vehicle excise tax 

3) Other (net) 



Total to be raised by taxation 
Property valuation - 1/1/78 and 1/1/77 
Tax rate (per $1,000 assessed value) 



754,000 



$4,253,000 



$55,600,000 



$76.50 



1978-79 


1977-78 


Estimate 


Actual 


$4,633,000 


$4,449,000 


264,000 


95,000 


4,897,000 


4,544,000 


100,000 


230,000 


54,000 


80,000 


57,000 


57,000 


49,000 


20,000 


30,000 


40,000 


290,000 


427,000 


$4,607,000 


$4,117,000 


239,000 


239,000 


120,000 


120,000 


41,000 


41,000 


400,000 


400,000 


$5,007,000 


$4,517,000 


460,000 


460,000 


212,000 


212,000 


82,000 


87,000 



759,000 



$3,758,000 



$54,300,000 



$69.20 



(X, V) 

C •!-> 

S -H U 

<D </) rt 

Z 3 4-> 

o co 



00 


r^. 


r-^ 


n 


(T> 




Q 


2T Q 


«=£ Z 


< 


co 


r^ r-» 


(T> r-» 




LO 


WIN 


<_> CS O^ 


•-" ID r— 


1— C 


co oc: •< 


i-IVO 


h- h- N 


<£ I 


1— t— LO 


WiON 


cr> cy> 


Jr-r- 


S OO • 


uiam 


z <C r** 


UJ LU 1 


O 5- <T 


p^ 


CC CT> 


<£ r- 


Q 


z: co 


lu cd 


_i <: 


<t LU 


o >- 


—1 


<*. 


o 


CO 


»— 1 


U_ 



> 
o 

H X 



C P. 

O -H 

E o 



•p 



C 3 

O .-h 

to X rt 

f-i +J > 

Ph <D 

t»5 O V) 

HQ, (D 

CD t/) 



U C_> U U t_> U C_> U 

UttiWWWWtQUUUihHhh HHH 
ooomotoooooovotMCMoo r-~ o en 
\OLOcMONOOOLOLOLor--toocn h i/> n 

OH(OW^\ONM»OaiOO(7l C*> Cn >— < 



■*^M-^t'*-'^'*^'*tOlO 



LO 



CD 


en 


LO 


to 


r- 


r^ 


m- 


en 


r> 


"rt- 


to 


to 


to 


vO 


en 


CM 


^ 


,_J 


** 


r» 


r» 


en 


CO 


en 


^r 


nO 


vD 


LO 


r» 


nO 


P-« 


to 


to 


o 


NO 


m 


CM 


vO 


oo 


en 


LO 


LO 


■- 1 


^r 


to 


\D 


o 


r- 


P» 


nO 


r^ 


^3- 


*t 


LO 


LO 


r-« 


^t 


CM 


o 


o 


nO 


to 


to 


_, 


NO 


CM 


vC 


«tf 


o 


<t 


OO 


h« 


oo 


to 


^r 


f- 


I— I 


l-O 


r- 


<» 


en 


rr 


"* 


i— < 


en 


i — i 


LO 


o 


oo 


LO 


oo 


cn 


o 


o 


■~1 


to 


rt 


LO 


en 


to 


LO 


r» 


o 


^f 


o 


CM 


(Nl 


r- 



M !N (N M r- ItOtOtOtO 



oooooooooooooo ooo 

oooooooooooooo ooo 

OOOOLOOOOOOOOOO OLOLO 

^HOOLO'^vovOrfvOr-iLotor^r^ ot--r^ 

encntotOLOLOLoto^j-'^-'^-tortLO moo oo 

i— It— irHi— li-Hi— li— I HM tM M N N (M M 
■b<3- 



to 




3 


l/s 


to 


3 


C 


to 


<D 


C 


C J 


fl) 




C 3 


CO 




R) 


B 


+-> 





co H 


U 


u 


CO t~ 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


■H 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


CM 


P-. 


00 


oo 


to 


,_, 


r\i 


PH 


LO 


■^ 


f> 


NO 


NO 


o 


CM 


CM 


"* 


en 


_, 


CM 


en 


LO 


«* 


LO 


CM 


NO 


nO 


P> 


CM 


o 


00 


r- 


t"- 


r— I 


to 


O 


o 


NO 


NO 


NO 


LO 


LO 


to 


to 


cn 


'"J, 


"d- 


en 


00 


O 


to 


■* 


to 



CN CM CM i— I 



NO 


o 


LO 


o 


en 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


LO 


o o 


LO 


en 


o 


<tf 


oo 


o 


NO 


i— H 


en 


o 


"* 


o 


to 


NO 


o 


to o 


•* 


^ 


CM 


CM 


01 


CM 


o 


00 


•— i 


o 


■— 1 


00 


to 


r> 


r- 


O CO 


^J" 


o 


*t 


oo 


"st- 


to 


r*. 


LO 


en 


CM 


or, 


CM 


cj 


r^ 


■^1- 


to \0 


o 


to 


o 


CM 


tO 


CN 


, — i 


en 


LO 


CM 


^H 


O 


en 


to 


\D 


NO 00 


o 


oo 


"l 


to 


en 


■<t 


o 


oo 


""^ 


to 


LO 


oo 


LO 


LO 


to 


tj- r- 


to 



NW 

O 5 
CD 



C LO 

x r- 

•h cn 

CO rH 



^HCMtOTjL0N0r--00CnOi— (CMtOTt 

cncncncncncncncncncncncncncn 



lo no r-- 
r-- r- r- 

cn en en 



</> 




c o> 


o 


r> 


•H 




+J o 


Cd 


M 


T3 


>*, 


c 


vD 


U 


i 


1 


00 


o ~-^ 


o 




o 


^ 


QEi 


r* 



to o o o 
o o o 

to O ft 



o o 

vO to 
CM 00 



o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


in o 


Ch 


(M o 


o 


t-H 00 






r-« 


00 cr> 


LO 


LO 



i-». _id 


cr> <c o 


i— «-o i— « 


dwo: 


»0 >— t UJ 


o •-« u_ ti- 


ro or 


uj oo _i 


UJCLN< 


zr tr> <_> 


ID —I r— O0 


"D <£ i — 


c_> r-- lo- 


ll i/} r^ 


C3 >— ■ 0> CTi 


wdlli — r-» 


LU O CM 


oiorootui- 


zd :c r»- re ^ 


l— h- cr. h- oo 


•— ' i — r*. 


DlO l Li_CT> 


z r— r-. o t— 


UJOiN 


Q_ i— en OO LU 


x i-n 


UJ • t— h— 


r-UZ 


u_. re o ct: 


O >~l— 21 o 


_I u_ 


Ul rZ> C£ vO 


_J "Z> o oo 


rz> u_ h-z 


02: 00 


uowq:m 


ICtZMl- 


c_> u_o u_ «c 


00 •— < O 


□ hbdZ 


o<iui 


— IM J- SI 


cc 01 2; 


ui d_q: 


o_ c_> 


QC U_UI 


LUCL CC 


re o_oo 


1— <u -0 


q: c 


q: zz> re 


(— 



r- 


t/> t~- 


<D \ 


U ft 


3 to 


•M \ 


•H CM 


T3 -H 


C 1 


a) r-~ 


Cur- 


X ^ 


UJ t-H 


t>. 



01 


^o 


•rt 





vO 


LO 


to 


cn 


^r 


p> 






01 


i-« 


^ 





LO 


vC 





LO 


■- 1 





O 


LO 





CT> 


cn 





"3" 


LO 


to 










«tf 


1—1 



cd to 

•H \ 

U vO 

Cu 1 

o r- 
Jh r- 
Cu\ 
an 
< \ 







O 
O 


O O 

O O 


O 
O 


M 


O 

O 


O O 
O O 
fM CM 


to 

O 






r_l 


1-1 



O 
O 


OOO 
OOO 






LO 
O 
CM 


OOO 

O LO O 

OMOO 




LO 
O 








to 

LO 


lo ai to 

LO 


00 



h» 


10 r- 


<D \ 


U O 


3 to 


f \ 


• H vO 


T3 1 


C vO 


<D r- 


Cu\ 


X ft 


W \ 


r- 



o o ^ 

O O vO 

to to o^ 



Oh 


O 


CM 


og 


■«* 


CO 


rg 


r^ 


to 


\C 






LO 


LO 


to 


1-1 



00 -3" O 
O CO o 
LO vO o 










> 


<u 


cd 


</) 


f-l 


c 


«J 


<u 




Cu 





X 


■M 


UJ 


cd 



oc 




■H 


C 


C0 *4H 


w 




Sh 





c 


> 




03 


in 





O 




^-t 


^ 


CU 4-> 





c 


rt 





X 3 







to 


Dh 


tu 


hJ 


6 









^ ts 



CM to M- LO 



(/) 




cu 







V) 


h 


c 


cd 


CJ 


1— 1 


tt 


cd 


X 


CO 


HJ 





<D 


a> t3 






to a; 




u 


C f-i 


O 


03 


0) a> 


O 




Cu +-> 


■H 


cd 


x <u 


<+^ 


CO 


u S 


t4H 






O 







10 



n 




C 


o\ 


o 


r~- 


•H 


"»n 


*J 


o 


rt 


to 


T3 \ 


C 


xo 


o 


1 


1 


00 


o 


n. 


o 




(1) 


*v 


os 


r*» 



o o 
o to 

O LO 



O O 
O O 
LO tO 



o o 
o o 
.-< to 



o 
o 


O 
O 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 

CM 


o 
o 


o 

o 

00 

to 


o 
o 

xD 


o 
o 
r-. 



o o 
o o 

\D LO 





r> 


CO 


r^ 





*v 


u 




3 


t-O 


4-> 


v 


•H 


eg 


TJ 




C 


i 





r^ 


pr- 


X 


"»«. 


U-l 


.— < 




*»» 




[-» 



o 


LO 


o 


"<* 


o 


CN 


o 


to 


LO 


to 











o 


O 


o 


■* 


LO 


r-« 


(NI 




vD 


^H 






vO 





o 


O 


o 


o 


LO 


o 




O 




x£> 








to 



ft vO 

p. i 
o t- 

P\ 



o o 
o to 

O LO 



o 
o 


o 
o 


O LO 
O Csl 
O CM 






r^ 




1-1 





o 
o 


o 
o 


c 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 
rj 


o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
o 


o 
o 
to 






to 


•*!- 


IN 





t-> 


to 


r-« 


0) 


**«. 


^ 


o 


3 


to 


+J 


v.. 


H 


vD 


c 


\o 


0) 


P»« 


P.^. 


X 


!— 1 


XI 


*v 




r-- 



o 


LO 


o 


vO 


o 


00 


o 


en 


CO 


rg 






to 


CN 



o 


CM 


o 


■* 


o 


to 


o 


r- 


LO 








o 





o 


Ol 


o 


Tt 


o 


rt 


o 


oo 


CN 





o 


o 


Oi 


o 


C7> 


o 


LO 


rg 


o 


t>. 


o 


to 


o 


o 


to 


o 


to 


oo 


o 


1 — 1 


0x1 


eg 


r-« 


•<* 


xD 






to 


"«* 


oo 



h- 


<M 


cc 


00' 


SO 


r-« 


O 


CO 


xD 


xO 






*» 


to 


rj 


1-1 

















c 


03 03 












c 


c 










o 


r-l -H 








o 


■M -H 










•H 


o3 O 


co 






■H 


C E 










■M 


CO -H 









co 


T3 










03 


ch 


o 






co 


E < 


to 










ft 


- 4-1 


•H 






•H 





Fh 










+-> 


co O 


> 






6 


b£ US 


o 










CO 


h 







CO 




E 


03 


to 


to 








•H 


o3 C 


Q 








O 


C ex 


to 











<L» 


bC 


^ O 





T3 





03 





u 


OS c 





•H 


co 


CO 


X CO 


0) 


•M -H 


co be 


fH 


co 





co 




s: -h 


to 


^ 


C 


^ C 


^ C 


06 


CO 4-> 


C C 


03 


C 


P 


c 


c 


c 


to 


03 





rt 


cd 




•H O 


-H 


O 





P, 





o 


T3 C 


< 




Ph 


bO p, 


r* 


—i P, 


U3- 


00 0) 


P, +J 


CQ 


P~ 


< 


p 




C 03 




id 


X 


X 


h 


03 X 




CD ,-1 


X O 




X 




X 


■M 


oS <-{ 


<+^ 


co 


tu 


-J tu 





CO W 


C 


Di UJ 


UJ > 


bO 


m 


<u 


U-J 


cd 


hJ Cl 


o 








CJ 




o 






C 




O 




> 




T3 






1— I 








■M 






c 




T3 









U 


o 


1— I 


cO 


LO \£> 


S 


O .-H 


u 


O .-t 


CM tO 


c 


o 


U 


f— ( 


CO 


CN tO 


cd 


LO 


LO 


bC 


LO LO 


\0 vO 





r-~ r-» 


r- r-~ 


o3 


oo 


03 


00 


e 


CO 00 


o 











o 














O 




o 




CQ 






►J 




E- 




W 






D- 




0Q 




CJ 





11 



n 




c 


Cn 


o 


h. 


• H 


">v 


•J 


O 


rt 


KJ 


-O 




C 


sD 


<X) 




1 


oc 





••^ 


o 




<u \ 


Q£ 


r- 



o o 
o o 

rH LO 



o 
o 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


o 
O 


© 

o 

CM 


o lo 
o r- 

o cn 


LO 

cn 


LO 

00 










00 


io lo 


o 


cn 

CM 



O LO o 
O tO o 

o to o 



o o o 

LO LO O 

LO 00 Cn 



rH -H 

3 to 

+-> \ 

•H CM 

-a -h 
c ■ 

8^ 

UJ H 



cc 


■<* 


CM 


■^r 


\0 


•<* 


•- 1 


r- 


m 


LT, 


^ 


00 


oc 


«* 


to 


LO 


r^- 


Kl 


1—1 


vO 














CM 


LO 

o 



O) Q» CJl 


r- 


cn r^ o 


O 


Cn CO C-- 


vD 


^f Hlfl 


«-< 


Cn 00 ^i 


O 


CO ■>*■ [^ 


o 


Cn vO "H- 


i— i 


cn vo oo 


LO 


Cn CO LO 


•<3- 


vO LO \£5 


cn 










OOirt 


vO 


M O) M 


en 


00 rH 


O 


vO ^H 


CO 



C CO 


o o 


o 


O r- 


o o 


o 


•H \ 






4-> O 


o o 


o 


CO to 


o o 


c 


•H \ 


.-H LO 


£ 


rH vO 






CU 1 


00 


oc 


O r- 






f-. r- 






O,^ 




CX-i 




< \ 







o o 


O 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


O LO 


LO 


LO 


O CM 


CNJ 


en 


LO \0 


i— ( 


o 








vO v£> 


to 


l»» 




1—1 


CM 



o o o 

o o o 



o o 
o o 


c 
o 


o o 

O TJ- 

en o 


Lf] 
P> 

to 






o •** 

tO CM 


cn 


•— ' 





•H VO 

"O I 

C vO 

CD t~- 

X rH 



00 O 


cn 


CO 
00 


to o 

00 ^o 

^r o 


to 

LO 


vO 
CM 

o 








LO LO 


o 


CM 
CM 



rr cm 


to 


LO LO 


oc 


r^ <-> 


vO 


v£> 00 


^ 


vO vO 


cn 






-*■ cn 


*? 


vO rH 




•— « 





H f- LO 
Cn rH CM 

cm \o r- 











a> 
































10 


























g 


























a 






















v 




X 






CD 
















u 




UJ 






















c 










o 


>- 














CO 




M 






•H 


E- 














c 




c 






■M 


Di 








u 






o 


rH 








E- rH 


UJ 








CD 






•M 


CO 


fn 




a> 


Z CO 


CU 








«HH 






c 


CD 


to 




</> 


UJ 


o 








trt 






■H 


X 


CD 




c 


r? I— ' 


Di 








c 






J$ 




c 




CD 


Z CO 


a 








CO 






:s 


+J 


cd 


•H 




P- 


Oi -H 










rH 








Ifl 


c 


oc 




X 


UJ o 


US 








•M 


W 




uS 


CO 


•H 


c 




UJ 


> CD 












o 


CD 




1— 1 


f-> 


UJ 






O Oh 


cy^ 








T3 


bC 


CJ 


DC 




CD 






to- 


U W 


z 








C 


CO 


•H 


c 


<U 


CD 


US' 








o 








3 


s 


> 


■H 


i— 1 


C 






o 


J ?H 


CO 








u. 




rH 


+-> 


o 


•H 


M 




o 


< o 


cc 


+j 










uS 


CD 


c 


■H 


M 


C 


c 


C 


OS <4- 


UJ 


c 








CD 




CO 


CO 


+-> 


C 


•H 


CO 


CO 


UJ 


a 


CD 


tn 




c/> 


> 


■M 


tfl 




CD rH 


ft 


tu 


+-> 


•H 


c 


2 O 




E 


o 


CD 


rH 


(m 


G 


CD 


CD +-> 


</) 0- 


CO 






13 


CD 


UJ o 


O. 


•M 


•H 


(/) 


CD 


CD 


CD 


•H 


V) C 


C 




uy 


3 


O 


+J 


CJJ LO 


o 


rH 


f- 


c 


tn 


W 


£ 


rH 


C CO 


c 


<u <t> 


i— ( 




t/> 


+-> 


C 


■ 




CO 


~ 


o 


•H 


CD 


+-> 


HJ 


CD rH 


« 


p. CD 


CO 


M 


C 


m 


■H 


Di 00 


z 


a, 




a 


3 


ad 


rH 




CXT3 


-a 


X Jh 


■H 


C 


o 


i—i 


3 


CO 


O *9- 


o 


CD 


aJ 


X 


rH 




CO 


c 


X X 


>H 


uj E- 


O 


•H 


u 




C_3 


s: 


u. 




Q 


vz 


UJ 


U 


ii 


a 


00 


UJ I 


Ed 




0) 


+-) 




cO 






+ 


H 












CD 






s 




CO 


i— 1 

3 




X 






co 


u 

UJ 


CD 
O 








ST 


a 






•> 


vo r^ 




to 


LO 


c 


C 




< * 


H 


•H 


o 




CM 




CD 


c 


CM tO 


<D 


00 00 


* 


c 


CO 


2 


c. 


cn 


H 


o 


rH 


o 


a 


O 




h 






r< 






o 




O 






O 


OS 


o 










•H 






E- 






u 




H 






H 


c- 


a 










PL. 







12 



t/i 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


C <T> 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


O r- 


























•H \ 


O LO 


LO 


v£> vO 


CM 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


(Nl 


+-> o 


o r^ 


r^ 


rg lo 


00 


o 


lo o 


LO 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


■*r 


rt to 


O vD 


vD 


VO r-i 


r-» 


r- 


vO 00 


** 


vO o 


\o 


to vO 


cy> 


r- 


T3 \ 


























C vO 


■* i-H 


LO 


O •<3- 


to 




00 i-t 


O 


(Nl r-l 


to 






(Nl 


0> l 






to .-< 


lo 








(Nl 


(Nl 






CTl 


E oo 
























*» 


E r- 
















o \ 
















o <-• 
















<L> \ 
















o£ r- 



























r^ 


IA r- 


<U \ 


(-> r-i 


3 to 


4-> \ 


•H CM 


T3 H 


C ' 


<u r- 


ftl^ 


X \ 


tU r-l 


•»»» 


r- 





o 

o 


10 


o 
c 






■^j- 





ri vO 

ft I 

o r- 

ft\ 

ft-. 
< \ 



o o 

00 O 
vO 00 



o o 

O LO 

o r- 





r*» 


M 


r- 


a 


\ 


Pi 


c 


3 


to 


+-> 


■*v, 


>H 


vC 


c 


>c 


0) 


r» 


ft^ 


X 




tu 


*"> 




f» 



LO (Nl 

00 — I 

(Nl CO 

00 c 

tO r-l 



LO O 
00 O 
CTv 00 



00 00 
OO O 

o to 









c 






C 


o 




off 


c 


a 






■H 


x 




tX -M 


tu 




C 


ed 






•H 


o 


uj 




c 


■H 






■H 


«4h 


(A 




cd 


• H 


<D 




u 


•M 


•H 




H 


h 


—1 






o 


ft 


o 


s 


u 


ft 

a 


o 


tU 




ft 


C 








rt 








3 


LO 




t0 


x; 


1 — 1 




r— i 


e 








< 









t/i 




O 


c 




in 


o 


(/> 


C 


•H 


o 


o 


4-> 


M 


ft 


d 


nS 


X 


o 


2 


tu 








C 






3 






E 




CM 


E 


CJ 


CN 


o 






u 







C 





o 


"3 


4-> 


>H 


c 


(/) 


H 


+-» 


rt 


3 


S 


c 


i/j 


\£> 


rj 


tN 



9 

22 


r-l 
o 






4-> 





<4-l 


u 


w 


O 


1) 


C 




ex 


a> 


tfl 


(/• 


a 


rn 


c 


x 


o 




tu 


fj 






CJ 






<u 






p. 


co 


0) 


w 


rj 


CM 



</5 






•»-> 






X 




'x 


cj; 




<u 






M 


^ 




C 


s 


t/1 


o 




o 


ft 


<4H 


aj 


X 


O 


tu 


tU 



H >- 

U E- 

U4 Oi 

H tu 

o a. 

a: o 

d. a: 

CL 

O "J 

tu 

to 

to 2 

J C 

< to 

H a: 

o tu 

E- cu 



13 



in 




C 


Cn 


O 


r- 




"»v 


*J 


O 


cd 


M 


T) 


*»», 


C 


sO 


u 


i 


g 


or, 




r— 


o 


•v 


o 


i — i 


d> 


--- 


a: 


l*s. 



c 

o 


O 

o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


LO 


LO 


O 
c 
c 


o 

LO 


o 

CO 


oo 


so 


so 


o 


*t 



o o 

.-H t-O 

tO CM 

CO CM 



o o 

o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o o 
o o 


o 

o 


o o 
o o 
o o 


o 
o 


o 

o 

CM 


O 

o 
o 


o o 
o o 

LO vO 


c 
o 


O vD 
tj- CM 


sO 


CM 


tO 


00 CM 

r-t tO 


LO 
CM 

to 



LO 


LTJ 

to 


Oi 


o 

o 


o 


CM 

sO 


LO 

to 


oc 

Cn 

to 


o 

sO 


v£> 

LO 

to 


^ 


-^r 


to 


LO 


[-- 



i en 

l Cn 
I CO 



cn cn 


00 


£ 


to 

LO 


LO 
LO 


LO 


on 

sO 


CO o 
O Tf 

rr to 


o 
o 


sO 


CM 


00 
CM 
^3" 


sO 

to 


LO 

to 
oo 


00 vO 

Tfr i-H 


CM 


sO 


oo 


P> 


to 


CM 
OJ 



c 


CO 


o 


r~ 


•H 


*^ 


+-> 


o 


cd 


to 






Sh 


sO 


p. 


i 


o 


t -- 


h 


h* 


ft 


>>», 


ft 




< 


••v, 




r^ 



c 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
so 


o 

LO 

rj 


c 
o 
o 


c 

LO 
LO 


o 


r>. 


sO 


to 


o 


to 



o o 
o o 

O LO 



o o 
o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o o 

O LO 

■^ to 


o 
o 


LO 
L0 


o 
o 

o 


o 
o 
o 


o 

o 


LO 

c 


LO LO 
tO CM 


LO 

•<* 


•<* 
CN 


o 
to 


r- 


to 


cn 
o 
to 



r-s 


to r- 


CD ^ 


U O 


3 to 


■M \ 


• H sD 


T3 1 


C \D 


O 1^ 


ft^» 


X ^H 


w -^ 


r- 



so 

OJ 


L0 


LO 

o 


o 

o 


LO 

cc 


cc 
cc 

LO 


co 

LO 


LO 

oo 

LO 


o 

CM 

to 


LO 

sO 


*t 


sO 


LO 


o 


sO 

to 



to en 



■^r <-> 


LO 


•** 


,_, 


r- o 


CM 


\D 00 


** 


LO 


00 


r^ to 


to 


00 CO 


r*« 


or, 


CM 


cm en 


OO 


to to 


o 


t>. 


co 


to en 


r*- 


LO en 


LO 


oo 


O 


to to 


^o 














r- en 


sO 


o 


LO 


so to 


en 


CM CM 


to 


cm 


■^r 


<-i to 


o 


r-i 










to 









o c 








o o 








• H >H 








> -P 








!h O 








a> co 








LO ,-H 
















C O 








o u 


X 


t/i 




•H 


+-> 


U 


o 


+-> CD 




•H 


in 


O DC 


cd 


h 


c 


<U Cd 





cd 


CD 


CU.O 


:r: 




a 


10 J-i 




cd 


X 


C aJ 


LH 


CO 


LU 


t-H CJ3 


o 










o 


^ 


CM tO 


a 


c 


o 


o o 





CN 


CN 


CM CN 









cd 




O +-> 








<D 




t-t ^ 








X 




E- cd 

< 








•!-> 


LM 


H H 








V) 


to 


t-H cd 








co 


c 


2 -H 








1-1 


cd 


< o 

CO CD 








CD 


H 


ft 












ca to 








O 


TJ 










•H 


c 


X ^ 








•M 


3 


E- O 








in 


u- 


J <4-t 






CO 


crt 




< 




X 


(/) 




(D 


w o 




h 


c 


i— < 


> 


I o 


f-< 


cd 


a> 


cc! 


Ih 


o 


C) 




ft 




<l) 


a: * 


U 


cd 


X 


o 


LO 


O r- 


•H 


U) 


UJ 


CD 


U 


CJUVi- 


t+H 






ft a: 




tw 






C/1 




CO + 


o 








, — v 


J 




^t 


LO 


* 


a:. 


< * 


u:, 


O 


o 




* — < 


H * 


o 


CN 


CM 






O 


Cj 










H 









C 




<D crt 


,— 1 


■M 






cd 




w > 


•H 


c 






c 


tf) 


c o 


CL- 


o 




0) 


a; 


>> 


<U E 




6 




CJ 


*J 


cd 


ft CD 


IO T3 


■M 




•H 


c 


■=-- 


x a: 


■»-> C 


^H 




> 


•H 




UJ 


X crt 


crt 




fH 


cd 


v3 


o 


bfii-J 


& 




a; 


>■ 




■(-> o 


•H 


CD 


L0 


CO 




in 


C •-" 


►J X 


n 


0) 






^ 


CD 


fH 




»H 


F 


cd 


h 


E "J 


■t-> cd 


to 


i-> 





U 


crt 


ft 


<D 4-> 


M 


a 


+j 


u 


a 


•H ^ 


CD -H 


u 


i — i 


L0 


c 




3 O 


5h C 


o 


cd 


■z 


CD 




cr c 


+-> crt 


(* 


CO 


Q 


C_J 




PJ CO 


CO CO 


o 






























O 




CM 




to ■<* 


LO \D 


X! 


o 


o 


o 




o o 


o o 


p 


to 


IO 


to 




to to 


to to 


C- 















14 



4-> O 

rt to 



o 

o 


O O O 

o o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 


o en o 

O LO o 
00 to tj 


LO 


cc 


o 
o 

c 


o 


CN 


00 00 

to 


o 


o> 


to 


cc 



r-- 


CO 


to r~- 


a> 


<D ^ 




^ -H 




3 to 


vO 


•M ^v. 


vO 


• H CM 




T3 --I 


CM 


C i 




0) r- 




p-,r-~ 




X \ 





vO 


r- 


to o 


r i 


CN 


L0 


IO 


co 


to 


r- ci 


•- , 


cn 


-* 


to 


IN 


*t 


to LO 


h- 


CN 


r~- 


^r 


O 


vO 


O Ti- 


cn 


vO 


LO 


IO 


-T 




to LO 


vO 


«tf 


CO 


to 


co 




tO CM 


,H 


CM 


o 


C7. 


LO 




o to 

LO 


CM 






CN 



C 00 


o 


o 


O f- 


o 


o 


•H ^ 






4-> O 


o 


LO 


rt to 


LO 


LO 


•H \ 


to 


o 


V. vD 


* 


•t 


Ph 1 


o 


o 


O r- 


1— 1 


CM 


fn r- 




to 


cx\ 






a,r-> 






< \ 







o 

o 


o 
o 


o o o o 
o o o o 


o 


o 
o 


o 
O 


o 
o 

CC 


r-4 O O CTl 

r- o o cm 

O O 00 CM 


o 
o 

o 


c 
o 

C7a 












o 




vO\ONO 

LO O Ol r-H 

tO i— 1 CM 


o 


o 
cc 
cc 



r- 


T* 


vO 


t/i r- 


LO 


00 


CD Ov. 






u o 


-3- 


CM 


3 to 


LO 


to 


■M \. 


to 


o 


•H \D 






*T3 1 


1— 1 


1— ( 


C vO 




CM 


<u r^ 




to 


p,\ 






X ^ 






w ^ 









LO 

CM 


t}- o 
o o 


r- 


to 

LO 


LO 

f-. 


rf 


LO 

c 


o 

LO 


O 00 

.-H 00 


LO 
LO 

O 


1/5 

cc 


LO 


a, 

LO 


00 




to Ot 

i— i 


LO 
CM 


cc 


CT, 

to 


i— ( 















CO 








O X 






o 








UJ 






m c co 




</) 








u 






<L> rt w 


I— 1 


c 








t— 1 




i— i 


o C V $H 


o 


CD 






w 


> 




o 


• H 0) <D CD 


o 


ct, 






<u 


a: 




> 


> +-) w X 


£1 


X 


CO 




o 


w 




rt 


k c w +J 


o 


u 


w, 




•H 


co 




fH 


CD -H < O 


co 


bC 




cc 




> 






C H 


co rt 




c 


off 


o 




^ 


- 




o 


2T3X 


<— i 


J= 


•H 




3= 




<D 


CO 




• H 0) 


.-i CD +J 


o 


w 


-o 


0) 




co 


tr> 


CO 


2 




tfl 


-M +-> 


C O "? X -H 


o 






o 


u 


LU 


<U 




1 




r— 1 


rt rt 


O O -h s 


rC 


ac 


•H 


c 




CJ 


o 


- 




o 


f-t +-> 


•H £ C U- 


u 




D 


rt 


—1 




•H 


to 


UJ 




o 


+-> co 


■p o o 10 


CO 




cc 


c 


CQ 


> 


> 


c 


H 




4= 


w 


O CO -H cp E 




a) 




CD 


3 


o; 


?-! 


oj 


UJ 




o 


•H LM 


3 4-> o rt 


X 


C 


c/> 


4-> 


Cl, 


UJ 


o 


^H 


> 




CO 


c o 


l-> fn cd f-i 


bO 


o 


^ 


c 




CO 


co 


<D 








•H 


+J CD ^ • M 


•H 


.— 


?H 




Oi 






+-> 


cc 




X 


E ■!-> 


to x <d cr o 


~ 


GC 


o 


03 


O 


- 


- 


CD 


o 


Z 


u 


-d p 


c *-> a. o fn 




o 


3: 


S 


U- 


co 


c 


> 


u. 


o 


4-> 


< O 


•-" o o < a. 


aJ 


cr: 


O 




CO 


1 


rt 




co 


H 


c 






C 




•H 




J 


h 




J 


< 


<u 


• «J 




o 




r-H 


o 


< 


UJ 


(0 


to 


< 


U 


E 


r— < — i 


cm to ^r r^ en 


•H 


a 


XI 


pH 


H 


E- 


+-> 


o 


H 


3 


0) 


o o 


o o o o o 


M 


— 


3 


to 


o 


0J 


0) 


^r 


o 


a 




LO LO 


LO LO LO LO LO 


0) 


1/1 


Cu 




H 


> 


> 




H 


UJ 


UJ 






ce: 





15 



«/) 


o 


o 


c o> 


o 


o 


O r- 






•H -^ 


r^ 


IO 


*-> O 


r» 


o 


03 tO 


00 


m 


-O \ 


•> 


•> 


C vO 


to 


oo 


0) l 


00 


00 






vO 


o \ 




r\i 



LO o o o o o 

O LO LO CN 00 00 

r*. r^- !*>■ t-~ ^f cn 



o 


o o o o 


o 


o 


o o o o 


o 


LO 


o o o o 


o 


00 


O O LO o 


LO 


CN 


to r-«- f-H r-- 


00 








h» 


o to 00 to 


LO 


r}- 


CN 


to 











r - 


1/) 


r- 


u 




h 


r-H 


3 


to 


4-> 




•H 


CM 


T3 


, — i 


c 


I 


CD 


r-« 


& 


r*s 


LU 


i-H 




-^ 




t- 



cn 


CT> 


to 


r^ 


^ 


ro 


LO 


en 


O) 


i— 1 


■^r 


h~ 


^3- 


CM 


t~~ 



O cn cn to to 



i-t o r- \D 
to o Ch LO 

^ LO \£> (N 



5h vD 
ft i 
O t-» 



o o o o 
o o o o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o o o o 
r- o ^ o 
»st- vD r^ vO 


O I 

LO 1 
LO 1 


o 
(J) 


CN LO vO vO 
00 CN 


£ 


CN 

to 



o to h- to 





o 

o 


00 


cj ^ 






fH O 




vD 


3 to 






■M "^ 


cr> 




•H vD 






T3 1 


o 


to 


CJ h- 




•s? 


Ph\ 




* 


X H 






w ^ 







r»- 


CN 


O 


o 


CN 


^ 


O 


to 


CO 


O 


r- 


IO 


Ol 


Ol 


o 



LO VO LO LO CN 



M- 


o 


oo 


■^r 


\£> 


CTi 


O 


CN 


VO 


00 


CN 


o 


r^ 


to 


to 


^r 


LO 


LO 


<J> 


<» 


\D 


[■> 


i — 1 


f- 


to 












CTi 


ro 


s0 




o 

















S^ 








CJ 














•H W 




















T3 






fH C 














O orr 






rt cj 














+J 






H J-l CJ Ph 














ifl 0) 






as as to X 




o 










3 O 






•H CO c tu 




o 










U (= 






T3 CJ 




X 










rt 






O I PU l 




o 










i c 






■P X 




CO 










CJ 






U) f-i m u 


z 




z 








• 4-> 






CJ 


3 O O 


o 




X 


o 








OO £ CJ 






CJ 


C_3 -P 1 4-> 




o 


M 


1— ( 








■O'H C 


>* 




+-> 


O CJ 


H 


o 


•H 


H 






u 


h ni^ri 


CC 




+-> 


oJ (1) C (D 


< 


4S 


X 


< 






<J 


M2X 


1 




■H 


f-t O ?H 


W 


'-J 




CJ 




to 


0) 


o 




£ 


</) -H -H -H 


OS 


L0 


X 


35 




X 


O 




<l) X i rt 


CQ 




S 


cj a +j a 


u 




o 


Q 




Eh 


■H 


•N 


Wi fH S 


h- 1 




o 


•h aj 


w 


X 


CJ 


LU 




nJ 


U 


tfl 


q rt • 


hJ 




u 


5h X CJ X 


a; 


bo 


E-i 






U 


cO 


M 


5) h MX 








rt 4-> l, +j 




•H 


i 


OS 




X 


i — i 


o 


&xi "0 a, 


OS 


2 


c 


-i 3 O 3 


OS 


X 


o 


O 






ccj 


o 


X -H .-1 O 


o 


O 


o 


as o cj o 


o 




> 


Lu 




►J 


co 


cc 


U J ffl u 


LL, 




•H 


w>a:>- 


LL, 


X 






>- 












H 


+-> 






o 




CO 


Pi 


o 








CO 


< 


rt 




co 


0) 




►J 


< 


•H 








-J 


W 


CJ 




j 


E- 




< 


OS 




o 




CN O H CN 


< 


a: 


h 


O i— 1 CN tO 


< 


i 


r— 1 


E- 


03 


X 


CN 


CN 


CN to tO tO 


H 


u 


o 


o o o o 


P 


O 


LO 


O 


I — I 


3 


L0 


LO 


LO LO LO LO 


O 


UJ 


CJ 


\0 vO vO vO 


o 


> 




H 


kJ 


D. 








H 


cc: 


OS 




p 



16 



o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


o 


c 


O 


o 


o o 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


a 


o 


c 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


-- 1 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


c 


c 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


*» 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


CN 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


O CN 


o 


CO 


o 


LO 


o 


t^- 


o 


o 


oc 


o 


■"J, 


c 


cm 


o 


to 


O CN 


o 


oo 


lo 


"* m 


o 


LO 



NOMO 





r- 


V) 


r» 


<1> ^ 


M 




3 


KJ 


■H 


>v 


•H 


CN 


T) 


, — i 


C 


i 


V 


r*> 


cxr- 


x ^ 


u 


r- ( 




""N, 




C«- 



O O r- 1 O LO O CN lO 

ocn hono t io 

O LO O CTl O CM I CO 



o o 

O -<3- 
O CO 



I o to 
i o en 

I LO CM 



O r^ 



o o 

O LO 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


a 


ir, 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


c 


o 


— 


o 


r- 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


Tf 


o 


t- 


o 


CN 


o 


oc 


o 


o 


o 


CM 


c 


or, 


o 


■^r 


o 


a> 


o 


r- 


o 


CN 


o 


vO 


o 


CO 


o 


vO 


o 


tn 


LO 


CN 



CM O tO O 





r> 


to 


r» 


<L) \ 


Jh 


o 


3 


to 


+-> 


— , 




vO 


TD 


i 


C 


sO 


V 


r*. 


P. 




X 




uj \ 




r^ 



C*» 


CN 


to 


CM 


•c 


O 


tO 


^r 


LO 


LO 








rt 



oooooooooo 
or--i-<ocoocnooo 

OCMrHOCnOCOOOO 



o o o o rr o r- 
a> o <3- o o o to 
cm o rH o co LO , ^- 



tO O "3- O 

















• O 




tf) 




CO 

73 




-a 










■s, 










•M 
(O 














co T3 






T3 




C 




c 










C 




t ] 






UJ 














T3 r-H 


c 




C 




o 















c 




+J 






* — ' 














(= CO 


o 




o 




cc 




cc 


X! 


<4-l 






cc 
























O 


•H 




cc 










c 


o 










, 




PS 


T3 






CD 








CQ CD 


■^ 


</> 











o 


nj 








^H 


to 


•r- 




o 


r-« C 






V) 








O 


CO 


■X3 






VI 




CO 


nJ 


<a 






o 


T3 


s 




^c 


• O 






C 








• -H 


Pu 


c 


=x 


</) 


a) 


to 


O 




■j-, 




to 


c 


C 




u 


■M CQ 






CD 








Mh 


•H 


o 


T3 


-3 


jc; 


T3 


c 


c 


CO 




X 


c_ 


C 


o 




■M 


to 






Ph 








-o O 


U 


cc 




c 


o 


C 


S 


O 


X 




C 




CC 






UJ J= 






X 








.-H CL. 


•H 




CC 


c 


h 


o 


- 


00 


o 




o 


M 






^ 


v —' +-» 






UJ 








CQ 


•(-> 


oo 




cc 


- 


sz 


c_ 


! ( 


h 




CQ 


c 


fH 


L^ 






CO 








CO 






up 


c 


C 


i — . 




a. 




1 


o 


3 








o 


c 
z 


c 


C 


-O 0- 






oj 


uj 






CD 


< 


•H 


O 


o 




<D 


•H 


■z. 


c_ 


-o 


, — i 


"e 


N 


o 


CO 


c 




+-> 






1— 1 






O CD 




T3 





!/) 


T3 


w. 


■M 






c 


c 


1 


*J 


X 


^ 


o o 




c 




CD 


cs: 






•H fn 


X 




,e 


Bj 


C 


c 


pH 


<+* 


c 


n) 


c 




•H 





o 


CQ ^ 




CD 


10 


O 


uj 


UJ 


CD 


r— ( -H 


CO 


•H 


o 


X 


rt 


a 


3 





c 


hJ 


r_ 


's 


^^ 


•M 


c 


•H 




E 


+-> 


c 


H 


u 


O 


O U. 


H 


3 


w 


o 


j 


u 


S 










Cfl 


•H 


■H 


u 


X CQ 




■M 


C 


cO 


u 




•H 


CL, 




cc 




h 




■z 




(D 


■M 


c 


CX 




s 


4^ 


Ui 




4-> 




ft 


o 


C 


s 


> 


> 


c 


C 




c 


3 


B 


c_ 


C 


X 


ir. 


c 


c 


c 




It, 




c 


CO C 




cO 


1 


CD 


UJ 


cc 


u 


oa o 





1— ■ 





£ 


o 


1 


o 


CO 


<D 


x 


•H 





c 


o 


C 


c 


D, O 




Ph 


+-> 


u 


UJ 


CD 






o 








•H 




X 


U 




E 




c 


CD 


CO 








0) 


o 


C 




CO 


CO 


o • 




c 




T3 




•M 




(J 


o 


o 


E 




■M 


§ 




CD • 


CO 


Q 


■M 


•H 


cc: 






U 4-> 


■(-> 


* 


■M 


C 


•M 




■M 


h 


■M 


z 


•H 


+-^ 


^1 


C 


x 


4-> 


M 4-> 


w 




C 


co 


o 


H 


•M 


•H C 


c 


o 


c 


S 


c 


5 


C 


3 


c 




3 


c 


o 


c 


c 


•H C 


►— I 


X 




2 


u- 


CO 


XI 


U, KH 




CO 




-J 




2: 




c 






uz 




35 


LJ 




CQ l-H 


ec 


u 








UJ 


CD 






































uj 


CD 






co 


a 


Q 






































H 


•M 






hJ 










































uj 


CD 


o 




< 


z 


§ 


CN tO 


■^t 


LO 


kO 


CTi 


o 




CN 


to 


"* 




LO 


vD 


t-- 


CC. 


01 


d 


r-~ co 


S. 


6 


O 


o 


H 


s 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c— i 


r— ( 


i— I 


. — 1 






— I 


r— ( 


—i 


1— ( 


r— . 


CN 


o o 


UJ 


CD 


r-~ 


r- 


O 


o 


O 


CO CO 


cc 


oc 


oc 


co 


cc 


CC 


oc 


CO 


cc 




co 


CO 


oc 


co 


cc 


oc 


CO 00 


u 


U 






H 


E- 


H 







































17 



n 




C 


01 


c 


r- 


•H 


\ 


*J 


o 


co 


tO 


T3 \ 


C 


sO 





i 


1 


oc 





-^ 







o 




=i 


r> 



o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


^J 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


■H 


^* 


to 


o 


CJ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Ol 


00 


o 


(*5 


vD 


to 


r-. 


cs 


1/5 


o 


rj 


m 


r^ 


.— 


Cvl 


o 




























L/l 


"«» 


o 


to 




(Nl 


■H 






~^ 




o 


in 


X 


ra 


r- 


















CM 


rf 



n 


t-. 


co 


"-s, 


Jh 




3 


t*5 


•»-> 


^v 


•H 


ra 


~ 


i— < 


c 


i 


o 


r-- 


CL^- 


x -^ 



o <* o 


vO 00 O 


o o 


O CT> o 


TOO 


00 O 


tj- \o en 


I I o en o 


I v£> 00 


tOCl 


i i —i r- o 


i —i en 


to f- CO 


1 —1 CM i-H 


1 Tt l-H 








o> r- o 






CO LO LO 







Jh vO 
CX i 
o r- 
Jh r~- 

£C 

r-- 



o 


□ 


o 


o 


o 


a 


a 


o 


a 


a 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


C3 


o 


o 


o 


a 


o 


o 


o 


Tf 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


CM 


o 


— 


o 


o 


o 


o 


a 


o 


o 


o 


a 


en 


■«t 


o 


tn 


a 


m 


-3- 


CM 


m 


m 


CM 


1/5 


r^ 


i— i 


o 


o 




























en 


X 


vO 


to 




cn 


_i 






p-i 




T 


in 


X 


- 


vO 


















00 
CM 


t 



Jh O 

3 to 

+-> ^ 

•H VO 

*T3 I 

C vO 

CO !-- 

X <-H 



o 
o 


r-- 


in 

C5 


X 
X 

0) 


en 
en 


X 

O 
l/J 








en 


o 


£ 



to m o o 

O CM O CM 


o 
o 




to 

en 


i r- t o r^ 
i MMioeo 
i r^ in cm in 


I 00 

i en 
i i— i 


o 
o 


en 
to 

CM 


- 1 




r-. 


en 
to 

























w 




CO 






co 

Jh 
CO 
U 
























X) 




TJ 




CO 






























C 




Jh 




-!-> 






CO 








/ v 














— 


3 • 




O 




+-> 






E 






















c 


PU (rt 




O 










o 








4-> 














3 


C CsC 




0) 




g 






I 








V) 














Pu 


• •-• C 




04 




g 














T3 


uj 


a) 














V) -H 






0) 


o 


c 




c 








0) 


v — ' 


n 












C 


C X 4-> 




c 


(0 


U 


o 




CO 








3 




od 












o 


l-H 4-> 3 




2 


«J 




•H 




S 








c 


— 


43 






Jh 






•H 


•H X3 




C 


■M 


c 


w 












•H 


~ 


u 






a> 






« 


u? C •<-• 




E- 


• H 


DC O 


tfl 




CO 








+-> 


c 


Jh 




uj 


<+h 






S 


E Jh 






g 


C -H 


•H 


be +-> 


Q 






c 


CO 


3 




U 


m 






CD 


• -M 


m 


«4h 


£ 


■H -M 


E 


c 


3 


UJ 






o 




a. 




l-H 


c 






C- 


P,T) W 


♦j 


o 


o 


c o 


£ 


•H 


C 


l-H 






u 


co 






> 


cO 








(/> C -H 


Jh 




u 


c < 


C 


&C 


•H 


u- 








tfl 


-a 




OS 


Jh 






X 


o i-H a 


C 


c 




03 


U 


< s 








•> 


CO 


c 


•M 


UJ 


H 






•M 


X 


C- 


o 


c 


h CO 






1 


CO 






D 


* 


- 


tfl 


co 








c 


ml US' 


C0 




o 


Ch > 


,-H 


c 


ex 


CO 






u 


u 


j 


UJ 




-o 






p 


w 


a; 


4-> 


• H 




CO 


o 




< 






•fH 


s- 




* — ' 


E- 


c 






a 


<L> X OC 




CO 


•(-> 


■-H +-» 


u 




,c 


J 






> 


b 


c 




cc 


3 






u 


CO 4-> C 


c 


> 


rt 


rt CO 






W5 


u 






Jh 


£ 


o 


T3 


UJ 


£ 








X Jh -H 


2 


Jh 


Jh 


C E 


Jh 


•H 


Jh 


z 






0) 






C 


a 




Q 


13 




O D P 





a> 


fl 


O Jh 


O 


u 


CO 


3 


P 


CO 


CO 


■a 




o 




CD 


tu 


O 


X 


h ac 


H 


7". 


a> 


• iH -H 


+-> 


c 


XI 




z 


_3 




c 


+j 


aa 


CC 


& 


i— i 


•H 


W 


P. O "H 







l-H 


ao«^j 


tfl 


p 


E 


OS 


3 


< 


+-> 


CT$ 


c 




O 


PL, 


«4H 


— 


E Jh Jh 




- 


CO 


CO *4H 


• H 





CO 


o 


u. 


E- 


,C 


J 






tt. 


(1) 


l-H 


•H 


S 


UCD. 




Z- 


u 


Qi < 


3C 


-_; 


s: 


u. 




o 













W) 


in 


V) 






















UJ 


F- 


Q 








co 


a: 


CO 

3 


W 

rt 






















> 


Q 


C 


en 


o 




< 




i— i 


o 


HOI H- 




1/5 


>d 


r-- x 


en 


a 


l-H 


< 


UJ 


Z 


2 


o 






E- 




CJ 


o 


o 


o o o 




O 


o 


o o 


o 






E- 


CO 


C^ 


O 


X 


X 




O 


a; 


z 


c 


(3) 


en en en 




o> 


on 


ct> a» 


en 


Ch 


en 


o 


UJ 


.- 








E- 


lw ' 


3 


3 




















H 


cc 


cj; 



IS 



10 




c o> 


o 


tv 


•H 


-v. 


*J 


o 


rt 


KJ 


-o \ 


c 


o 


o 


1 


p 




o \ 


o 




<D 


•v 


PC 


r~~ 



O o o o o 


O 


© O O O LO 


lo 


lo o cm o r-- 


^ 


CM O O O 00 




cm o vo o to 


CM 






OOl lfl(N 


r»- 


rj- 00 Tf CM- 


o> 





r- 


W 


r»> 


0) \ 


u 


i— i 


3 


KJ 


■P 


"»s. 


■H 


n 


TJ" 


<—> 


C 


1 


0) 


t*» 


ar- 


X \ 


en 






^> 




h- 



00 


u-. 


o 

o 


o 

LO 


oc 


CM 
1/5 


o 
o 
o 


K1 












CM 


o 

KJ 


t"s 



03 to 

•H ^ 

f-i vO 
CU l 

O r- 

5-. r-- 

< \ 



LO O O O LO 
CM O O O CM 
CM O 00 O 00 





h* 


</> 


f* 


0) •^ 


u 


o 


- 


KJ 


+-> 


*V, 




v£> 


-n 


l 


c 


« 


<u 


r> 


cx^ 


X 




UJ 


*v 




r* 



o 
o 


o to o o 

O vO O O 


to 


in 

tN 
CM 


O rj- O O 

o to o r- 

OOlOW 

\D LO O to 
tO LO CM 


CM 
LO 











£ 








C 


a: 








o 


< 








CO 


Cu 








e 


Q 








o 


a: 


t/> 






•M 


w 


O 


o 




V) 


H 


•H 


'X. 




0) 


< 


f-i <f) 


c 


tfl 


h 


S 


rt a) 


(1) 


■a 


<u 




h wa 


c 


+-> 


0£ 


nj rt 


X 


c 


c: 


O 


CO S 


u 


cc 




tt. 

CO 
►J 


o ^ 


CM 


i/l 


vO 


< 


LO LO 


LO 


l/J 


LO 


H 


C% 0> CJ> 


C7> 


o> 


O 



19 



WARRANT 
1978 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
the legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town 
Meeting for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks 
School Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-fifth 
day of March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the fol- 
lowing articles, except Article 1, and also to meet at the Smith 
School Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty- seventh day of March next, 
at 7:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following Article 1, by 
posting a copy of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, 
seven days at least before the twenty- fifth day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Australian ballot on Monday, March twenty- 
seventh, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8 p.m. 



ARTICLE 1 . To bring in their votes for one member for each 
of the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 
Selectman for three years 
Treasurer for one year 
Assessor for three years 

School Committee member for three years (2) 
Water Commissioner for three years 
Board of Health member for three years 
Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
Planning Board member for five years 
Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 
Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 
Director of DeCordova § Dana Museum £ Park for 
four years 

20 



Recreation Committee member for three years 
Tree Warden for one year 

Note: Included as part of the Annual Town 
Election will be an election of two 
members for three years each to the 
Lincoln- Sudbury Regional District 
Committee. 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, com- 
missioners, trustees, and other officers required 
by law to be elected by ballot, or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the sever- 
al elective officers of the Town and to determine 
whether any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to 
employ for additional compensation any of its members and to fix 
additional compensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 

and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning July 1, 1978, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to 



21 



renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 
as amended. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 

Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the 
Town's annual contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to 
operate the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, 
Massachusetts, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee & Selectmen 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes 
of education, or take any other action relative thereto. • 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to lease the development 
rights on one or more parcels of land described on a list filed 
with the Town Clerk as of March 7, 1978, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for con- 
servation purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or 
any other way, a parcel of land owned by the Sandy Pond Trust, con- 
taining 29 acres, more or less, known as the Pine Hill parcel, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land Owned by Sandy 
Pond Trust", dated March 1, 1978, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk; and for that purpose to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from availa- 
ble funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of those methods, and 
to apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either of them for 



22 



grants for such acquisition, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for con- 
servation purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, 
or any other way, a parcel of land owned by the Sandy Pond Trust, 
containing 63 acres, more or less, on the northerly shore of Sandy 
Pond, as shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land Owned 
by Sandy Pond Trust", dated March 1, 1978, by Cleverdon, Varney § 
Pike, on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and for that purpose 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of those 
methods, and to apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either 
of them for grants for such acquisition, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for con- 
servation or other municipal purposes, by purchase, 
eminent domain, or any other way, a parcel of land owned by Francis 
Umbrello, Trustee, Umbrello Family Trust, on the corner of South 
Great Road and Tower Road, containing 47 acres, more or less, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Land in Lincoln Owned 
by Francis Umbrello, Trustee, Umbrello Family Trust", dated March 1 
1978, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, on file in the office of the 
Town Clerk; and for that purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, 
or by any combination of those methods, and to apply to the U. S. 
and the Commonwealth or either of them for grants for such acquisi- 
tion, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for con- 
servation and recreational purposes, by purchase, 
eminent domain, or any other way, a parcel of land owned by Greta 
W. Snider on the corner of Lincoln Road and Mackintosh Lane, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Estate of George C. Hodges, Lin- 
coln, Mass.", dated December, 1928, Pierce $ Barnes Co., Civil En- 



23 



gineers, on file in the office of the Town Clerk; and for that 
purpose to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of those methods, and to apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth 
or either of them for grants for such acquisition, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts 

of money and income received from use of conserva- 
tion properties for the maintenance and improvement of conservation 
properties, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for necessary repairs to the 
Town Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for necessary repairs to the 
Town Barn, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for necessary repairs to the 
Fire § Police Station, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to acquire by purchase, emi- 
nent domain, or any other way, certain parcels of land owned by Ed- 
ward F. § Henry R. Flint for the Town Cemetery on Lexington Road, 
as shown on a plan by Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike, on file with the 
Town Clerk, and whether to provide said sum by appropriation of 
funds which have accumulated from the sale of cemetery lots, some- 



24 



i times known as the Cemetery Investment Fund, by taxation, by borrow- 
ling, by transfer from available funds, or by any combination of 
: those methods, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Cemetery Commissioners 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of equipment 
for the use of the Public Works Department, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of a truck 
for the use of the Water Department, or take any other action rela 
tive thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to amend its zoning 

bylaw by striking out the existing bylaw in its 
entirety and by adopting instead a new zoning bylaw, copies of the 
proposed text and map of which are available for inspection in the 
Town Hall and in the office of the Town Clerk, all in compliance 
with and pursuant to Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 

A RTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to rezone the follow- 
ing described land from R-l Single Family Residence 
District to R-3 Open Space Residential Development District, and to 
amend the zoning map of the Town, dated March 25, 1978, by including 
within the said R-3 District certain parcels of land belonging to 
Gordon P. Winchell and Dorothy W. Love, Trustees, and Guilbert S. 
and Amy Jane Winchell, as outlined in red on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Lincoln, Mass. Farrar Pond Subdivision", by Schofield 
Brothers, Inc., Registered Land Surveyors, dated May 29, 1970, re- 
vised 8/27/70, 1/2/73, and 1/18/73, a copy of which is on file with 
the Town Clerk and available for inspection, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board 
25 






ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to purchase a new fire engine 
to replace the 1964 International brush truck currently in use, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 



Selectmen 



ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the use of the Septage 
Disposal Study Committee, or take any other action relative thereto 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for high- 
way purposes, by purchase, by eminent domain, or 
any other way, interests in fee to Lewis Street, which was accepted 
as a public way under Article 1 of the Warrant for the Special Town 
Meeting on June 16, 1970, together with interests in fee to Parcel 
1, containing 2,030 square feet, more or less, and Parcel 2, con- 
taining 632 square feet, more or less, belonging to Laurence D. 
Herthel, both of which parcels are also needed for highway purposes., 
all as shown by a plan entitled "Lewis Street Easement Plan, Lin- 
coln, Massachusetts", by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, May 29, 1970, 
and to appropriate a sum of money therefor, and to decide whether 
to raise said sum by taxation, by transfer from available funds, or 
by any combination of those methods, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 

enter into an agreement with the Lincoln Foundation, 
Inc. for the leasing of the so-called Campobasso and Lunt houses, or 
Tower Road, which houses are owned by the Town, to moderate income 
tenants, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 

Bylaws of the Town by substituting a semi-colon for ■ 
the period at the end of Section 1 of Article 2, and adding the fol- 



26 



lowing to that section: "provided, however, that whenever the date 
for the Annual Town Meeting, as hereby established, falls on the 
Saturday before Easter Sunday, the Annual Town Meeting shall be 
held on the following Saturday, although the Election and ballot 
questions hereinabove described shall still be held on the last 
Monday in March", or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the construction of two 
new tennis courts adjacent to the existing town courts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 



Recreation Committee 



ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the improvement of Pierce 
Park, including without limitations the construction of limited 
parking facilities, the installation of attractive rubbish contain- 
ers, and for minor landscaping changes, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Pierce Park Committee 



ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 

of money to engage engineering services for a study 
and report on improvements to the Town water distribution reservoir 
located off Bedford Road, said sum to be expended under the direc- 
tion of the Board of Water Commissioners, and to decide whether said 
sum shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing, or by any combination of those methods, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to lay out and construct a 
bicycle path, partly within the boundaries of Sandy Pond Road and 
partly on private lands, from the intersection of said Sandy Pond 
Road with Lincoln Road to a spot westerly of the curve in Sandy 
Pond Road, near the Pumping Station, as shown on a plan entitled 



27 



"Preliminary Plan of Sandy Pond Road Bicycle Path", dated March, 
1978, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, presently on file with the Town 
Clerk and available for inspection, a final version of said plan 
suitable for recording to be recorded with Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds; for said purpose to acquire necessary easements 
or interests in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, 
from private owners wherever shown on said plan; and to provide 
said sum by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrow- 
ing under the authority of the General Laws, or any combination of 
those methods, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to lay out and construct a 
bicycle path, partly within the boundaries of Concord Road (Route 
126) and partly on private lands, from the intersection of said 
Concord Road with South Great Road (Route 117) to Baker Bridge Road, 
as shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Plan of Concord Road Bi- 
cycle Path", dated March, 1978, by Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike, pres- 
ently on file with the Town Clerk and available for inspection, a 
final version of said plan suitable for recording to be recorded 
with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds; for said purpose 
to acquire necessary easements or interests in fee by eminent do- 
main, purchase, or any other way, from private owners wherever 
shown on said plan; to apply to the Commonwealth for funds from the 
State Transportation Bond Issue; and to provide said sum by taxa- 
tion, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing under the 
authority of the General Laws, or any combination of those methods, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 33 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to be placed in a separate 
account and expended, as the occasion may require, to cover the 
Town's obligation to provide unemployment compensation insurance 
for its employees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



28 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to construct a transfer sta- 
tion at the present land fill site, and to determine whether to 
provide said sum by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing under the authority of the General Laws, or any combina- 
tion of those methods, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this fifteenth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventy-eight 



Ann F. Sutherland 
Robert M. Gargill 
Harold A. Levey 
SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 



29 




W7 
(^Annual c B^ort 

Town of Lincoln, (^Massachusetts 



REPORT 
of the 
OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
of the 
TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1977 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



Cover Desian - 



We are grateful to 
Harold A. Levey, Jr. , 
who took the picture 
shown on the cover, 
and to the DeCordova 
Museum staff for 
their help in de- 
signing the cover. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 22 

Town Clerk 37 

Affirmative Action Committee 73 

FINANCE 

Town Treasurer 75 

Town Accountant 80 

Board of Assessors 93 

Collector of Taxes 97 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire and Police Department 99 

Civil Defense and Disaster Preparedness 103 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring and Plumbing 104 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health 106 

Emerson Hospital Home Care Department 108 

Mental Retardation Programs and Services 112 

The Council on Aging 117 

Dog Officer 120 

Inspector of Animals 121 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 122 

Board of Appeals 127 

Conservation Commission 129 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 137 

Land Use Conference Committee 139 

Water Commissioners 141 

Lincoln Water Quality Study 145 



Page 



PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS (Continued) 



Public Works Department 146 

Tree Warden 147 

Transfer Station Study Committee 148 

Cemetery Commissioners 151 

Pierce Park Committee 153 

Celebration Committee 155 

Minute Man National Historical Park 156 

Lincoln Historical Commission 158 

Codman Community Farm, Inc. 160 

SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Lincoln Public Library 164 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 171 

Recreation Committee 179 

Elementary Schools 180 

Regional School 189 

Student Exchange Committee 207 
Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical 

School District 208 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital Statistics 217 

Valuation List 222 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 256 



TOWN CALENDAR 



SELECTMEN 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1977-78 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF 
OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



■- Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p.m. 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

- First and third Mondays of each month 
8:00 p.m., Superintendent's Office, 
259-9400 

- For appointments call Town Hall, 
259-8850 

- Meetings by appointment 

- Meetings by appointment 

- Every other Wednesday, 8:00 p.m., 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

- First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 259-8850 

- 5,158 (Town Census) 
■- 14.56 square miles 

- $69.20 per $1,000 valuation 

- Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 25, 1978 



Last Monday in March - March 27, 1978 

Residence in Town of Lincoln 

3,023 (As of June 21, 1977) 

Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. (Closed on Saturdays) 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert M. Gargill 
Ann F. Sutherland 
Harold A. Levey, Jr. , Chairman 



1977 has been a year in which some of the issues that have 
stirred controversy during the past few years have begun to come in- 
to sharper focus. 

Pursuant to last year's Town Meeting vote, we began implemen- 
tation of the Conservation Commission's most recent open space pro- 
gram by acquisition of the Phillips-Andover and Warner parcels. 
While the Town's respect for the natural beauty of the land and its 
contribution to our ecological systems was evidenced in the discus- 
sions involving these acquisitions, there was an indication of in- 
creasing concern for the tax burden of future open space acquisition 
and maintenance, as well as concern for housing needs. The Town 
boards took these concerns as a clear signal of a need to communicate 
land use alternatives to the Town and obtain citizen feedback from 
which a more coherent set of priorities and actions could be devel- 
oped. This then served to catalyze the effort leading to the Nov- 
ember 19th Land Use Conference. Gratitude for the success of the 
conference is owed to the Steering Committee that planned and man- 
aged it, and, no less, to the great number of citizens who thought- 
fully participated in it. 

One of the most striking challenges for the Board of Selectmen 
this year has been the demand for increased Town services occasioned 
by growth of our population and, more importantly, increased utiliza- 
tion of our resources, and the proliferation of regulations affecting 
the conduct of Town business. We have been plagued with parking 
problems in the vicinity of Pierce Park, Walden Reservation and the 
South Lincoln shopping area. These problems have arisen primarily 
because of the focus on Lincoln as a recreational center. The in- 
creased interest in cross-country skiing, the attractiveness of our 
open space for picnicking and hiking have brought a great many visit- 
ors to our community. While we have always had a commitment to 
share these resources with everyone, this commitment is becoming more 
burdensome and expensive. 



No less a problem than our own land use has been the conflict- 
ing land uses across our Town borders. Our Old County Road border 
with Waltham is now adjacent to an area of rapid residential and in- 
dustrial development. This not only threatens the tranquility of 
that neighborhood, but burdens the Town with additional traffic and 
services. 

To the north, along Concord's border in the vicinity of Vir- 
ginia Road, there is increasing industrial development. This is 
disturbing to our citizens in that area and presents problems not 
easily resolved. Conflicting land uses at town borders must be 
ameliorated through the joint action of both towns. Historically, 
towns have always concentrated their least desirable activities at 
town borders. Land fills, industrial development and other non- 
residential uses have traditionally been pushed out to the town bor- 
der to mitigate their impact on other areas of the town. As popula 
tion densities increase, however, these varying land uses must be 
brought into harmony with one another on both sides of the town line 
Until this is done, towns, and their residents who are adversely im- 
pacted, will continue to struggle with these issues. 

While it may seem that there has been a great orientation to- 
wards our physical environment this past year, we have endeavored to 
remain aware of the needs of all our citizens. After much concern 
over the new State law mandating that Class 1 ambulances be used as 
primary response vehicles for transporting patients to a hospital, 
we finally recommended the purchase of such a vehicle by the Town. 
This will undoubtedly provide improved medical services, but it does 
represent a more costly and higher level of service than has been 
provided in the past. 

In reviewing our citizens' needs, we sense significant senti- 
ment for additional services to both our young and our elderly. The 
increased level of vandalism and the somewhat limited recreational 
facilities for our youth have prompted many parents to seek a more 
coherent and better supervised program of activities for our young 
teen-agers. There exists a feeling that there is a gap between the 
activities provided by the schools and those provided by the Recrea- 
tion Committee. The Youth Committee has now hired a youth director 
and this problem is, at least partially, being addressed. Hopefully 
over the next year, interested boards and citizens will be able to 
arrive at a clear understanding on the extent to which the Town may 
effectively serve young people's needs. 

At the other end of the spectrum, our older population is being 
served by our Council on Aging. They have developed new programs 



designed to meet the health and service needs of some of our older 
citizens. However, there is increasing concern over the availability 
and cost of housing for this segment of the population. Discussions 
have been held to review other communities' approaches to this prob- 
lem. The model in Weston has been studied in some detail. The 
Board of Selectmen has been giving careful thought to various mechan- 
isms for providing housing for the elderly, as well as for those of 
moderate income, who may wish to move into the community. 

Route 2 

In a memorandum dated June 27, 1977, Secretary Salvucci deter- 
mined that Route 2 is to remain in its present corridor. Because of 
the importance of that decision, we attach a copy of the same, to- 
gether with our reply, as Appendixes A § B to this report. The de- 
cision was a great disappointment to the Town Boards, all the more 
so because it ignored the basic data in the draft environmental im- 
pact statement, and circumscribed the extensive efforts of our com- 
munity and neighboring communities to develop rational and coherent 
land use plans. Unfortunately, we now face continued division of 
our community, perpetuation of serious conflicts between through and 
local traffic in this area, and a considerable obstacle to the im- 
plementation of an integrated open space plan. To the extent human- 
ly possible, the Board will continue to do everything in its power 
to avoid or at least mitigate the grave problems arising from this 
decision. 

We remain concerned about the safety of this road and will co- 
operate with the State in the installation of safety improvements 
that will not increase the traffic capacity of the road or impinge 
more harshly on the abutters or other citizens of the Town. 

We shall also be alert to the State's avowed intent to dispose 
of the land it has taken for the northerly alignment. It is our 
hope either to prevent the sale of this land, or to assure that this 
decision will not preclude at some time the relocation of Route 2 to 
the north. This approach would inhibit further residential develop- 
ment in the corridor and make possible a reversal of the present de- 
cision should this be warranted at some time in the future. 

Town Departments 

With the hiring of a new police chief and settlement of litiga- 
tion arising out of the non-reappointment of a police officer, we 
have experienced a year of personnel stability. Many of our employ- 
ees have elected to be represented by unions, and salaries for these 



employees are arrived at through a process of formal negotiations. 
Our non-union employees, however, also represent a valuable resource 
to the Town. To clarify the nature and scope of their jobs and 
establish ranges of fair compensation, we authorized the Personnel 
Board to undertake a classification and salary study. With the 
help of outside consultants, the task was completed near the end of 
the year, and, with one or two exceptions, our compensation for each 
job has fallen properly within the range defined for each job. 

1977 witnessed the collapse of the Pierce Park wall and the un- 
foreseen events of the May 9th snow storm. Coping with these events 
made necessary a whole rearrangement of priorities. The wall col- 
lapse was due not to any negligence on the part of our Public Works 
Department, but to what proved to be a faulty concept of the Town 
engineering consultants in dealing with drainage problems in the 
area. Completion of the Trapelo Road bike path was delayed and 
work on the commuter platform at the train station did not commence 
until late fall. It now appears that increased use of contract ser- 
vices will be required to complete the newly programed work while 
catching up with all unfinished jobs. 

Also of concern is the matter of our ability to dispose of sep- 
tage in the manner to which we have been accustomed. We have been 
informed that the MDC is not willing to accept septage from the Town 
of Lincoln beyond 1979. A committee has been appointed to study 
alternate approaches to septage disposal in the hope that something 
useful can be developed between now and the 1979 deadline. In the 
meantime, however, we may ask our legislators to introduce legisla- 
tion to prohibit the MDC from refusing to accept septage from those 
towns that are now emptying their waste into the MDC system. 



One developing trend that has deeply troubled us over the past 
few years has been a lack of regard on the part of some citizens for 
the bylaws and regulations of the Town. We have experienced an in- 
creasing number of building additions being constructed without build- 
ing permits, and of structures being converted into apartments with- 
out prior application to the Board of Appeals. In one recent case, 
it has been necessary for the Town to petition the court to enjoin 
the occupancy of an apartment that has been occupied unlawfully. 

We would hope that these instances which indicate a lack of re- 
gard for our Town and for one another will not soon recur and that 
the quality of life here, which has been so envied by many in the 
greater metropolitan area, may be preserved for years to come. 






SCHEDULE A 

MEMORANDUM 

TO: Officials of Acton, Concord, Lincoln, Lexington, and 
the Route 2 Working Committee 

FROM: Frederick P. Salvucci, Secretary EOTC 
John J. Carroll, Commissioner, MDPW 

DATE: June 27, 1977 

SUBJ: Decision on Route 2 -- Acton/Concord/Lincoln 



After years of study, restudy, participation, argument, 
and deliberation on the future of Route 2 in the Acton/Concord/ 
Lincoln area, Commissioner Carroll and I are today announcing a 
decision. 

Route 2 will be improved on its present location 
with added safety features including some median 
separation, some possible grade separation, and 
some access control. The goal for Route 2 is 
to improve the conditions of a controlled access 
highway. 

Route 2 will not be reconstructed as a limited- 
access, grade-separated expressway. 

Route 2 in Lincoln will not be realigned to a new 
location. 

In short, we have opted for a "safety upgrade" solution 
to the Route 2 problem. 

We are convinced that this decision is most compatible 
with the transportation needs of the Route 2 corridor, the require- 
ments of Federal and State environmental laws, the transportation 
priorities of the region, and the realities of available funding. 
We also believe that this decision is the fairest to those most im- 
mediately affected. IVe have reached this decision after a careful 
review of the DPW's extensive environmental analysis, the many com- 
ments of public officials and interested citizens, and the record 



i 

of the public hearings. 

1. The Transportation Needs of the Route 2 Corridor 

Route 2 is adequate from a traffic capacity point of 
view to perform its current transportation function. The exten- 
sive study carried out as part of the Environmental Impact Study 
indicates that with an aggressive transit program the transporta- 
tion role of Route 2 in 1995 will not be significantly different 
than today. 

The section of the road where capacity problems are most 
likely to develop is the section within Concord. Yet the study 
clearly predicts that, with an aggressive strategy to encourage 
public transportation, the traffic situation in this section in 
1995 would be slightly improved over that experienced today. It 
is therefore not surprising that the public comment of both 
elected officials and private citizens as to this section has been 
almost uniformly negative to a major build option, and no case 
was made in the public review process that a "big build" project 
should be treated as a priority for very scarce funds. While 
this testimony is not in itself conclusive, the strong public sen- 
timent expressed throughout the participatory process, in combina- 
tion with funding constraints, regional transportation priorities, 
and environmental concerns, all suggest a strong case against a 
decision for major highway expansion. 

The major problem on Route 2 has been safety. Lack of 
median protection, uncontrolled grade crossings, excessive inter- 
sections with inadequate sight distances and excessive speeds have 
led to accidents. The recent safety improvements to parts of the 
roadway in the Concord area have had beneficial effect, but more is 
required in Acton and Lincoln as well. The portion of the road- 
way in Acton at Hosmer Street has recently been revised to elimin- 
ate cross movement. Piper Road and School Street also need atten- 
tion. The portion in Concord requires improvements at the rotary 
and at Crosby's Corner, and some extension of the median barrier 
where possible. The portion in Lincoln requires additional guard- 
rail and prevention of further curb cuts, as well as possible acqui- 
sition of some access rights to remove existing conflicts. 

All of these improvements can be carried out substantially 
on land currently owned by the Department of Public Works, although 
in some areas, especially in Lincoln, some additional landtakings 
would make more extensive intersection and safety improvements pos- 
sible. We can accomplish these measures to improve safety within 
our funding limitations. 



Finally, throughout the state and nation, experience has 
shown that the most significant improvement in safety has occurred 
with reductions in speed, so we are recommending continued and 
increased enforcement of the speed limits on the entire roadway. 

An additional transportation need may be to close Route 
2A through Minuteman National Park, although whether that is neces- 
sary on a permanent basis is uncertain. This is an issue which 
must be dealt with separately from the major Route 2 options, since 
Route 2A serves different traffic functions than any of the Route 
2 options studied. Closing Route 2A to accomplish Park objectives 
will simply make certain traffic movement more circuitous than 
presently. We believe that by the time the Park plans are com- 
pleted, 10 to 15 years from now, it would be possible to close 
Route 2A, if necessary, without overloading Route 2. In the mean- 
time, we are proposing to work with the Park Service on a possible 
compromise solution: to close Route 2A on an experimental basis 
at certain times of peak park usage, such as important weekend 
days. This would be similar to the policy used by the MDC in 
closing Storrow Drive during Esplanade concerts. Such temporary 
closing of Route 2A would require closer cooperation than has so 
far appeared evident from two Federal agencies -- the National 
Park Service and the U. S. Air Force. Access to Hanscom Field 
through Air Force property via Hartwell Avenue in Lexington is op- 
erationally possible, if the Federal agencies decide to share the 
objective of getting traffic out of the National Park. State 
agencies are prepared to work cooperatively with the Federal agen- 
cies to experiment with different means of attaining that objective 

A separate cluster of transportation needs involve the 
planning for Hanscom Field, some relief for Routes 4, 225 in Bed- 
ford, the possible Hartwell Area connector, and the MBTA studies 
at 128 and the Lexington branch railway. This set of problems is 
closely interrelated, but essentially separate from the Route 2 
question and will continue to be actively pursued in a coordinated 
way with citizen involvement through the already established pro- 
cesses of the Hanscom Field Task Force and the Red Line 128 studies 

2. The Impact on the Environment 

Confining the improvements to the present highway area 
will avoid taking of and minimize intrusion into the surrounding 
conservation lands, watershed areas, and other open spaces, which 
are among some of the most beautiful, most historic, and most im- 
portant lands in the whole Boston region. Indeed, Minuteman 
National Park is of national significance. Avoiding further in- 



trusion of traffic noise and interference into these lands is of 
great importance. 

The Hobbs Brook Reservoir, owned by the City of Cam- 
bridge, is an important water supply and watershed area, not only 
for the City of Cambridge, but for the region as a whole. Scarcity 
of water supply is an increasing, serious problem for Massachu- 
setts. Secretary of Environmental Affairs Murphy informs us that 
state policy to deal with this problem will focus more and more on 
increased utilization of local sources as the only strategy con- 
sistent with the continued existence of an adequate water supply 
for Massachusetts, so critical to our economic and social well- 
being. In this context, it is of vital importance to protect ex- 
isting local water supplies such as that of Cambridge. Signifi- 
cant changes to Route 2, particularly a shift to a northern align- 
ment, would badly affect this important water resource, both dur- 
ing and after construction, and should be avoided if at all reason- 
able from a transportation point of view. 

With a safety upgrade within the existing alignment, not 
only will intrusions into new areas be eliminated, but environmen- 
tal improvements can be incorporated into the existing roadway by 
such features as closed drainage in places, landscaping and noise 
buffers as appropriate. In addition, the unique aesthetics and 
visual qualities of existing Route 2 can be preserved and enhanced. 
By contrast, a new road -- either expressway or arterial -- on the 
Northern alignment in Lincoln would intrude into parklands, water 
supplies, and other open spaces which require and deserve the most 
scrupulous protection. 

Lastly, Section 4 (f) of the Federal Department of Trans- 
portation Act of 1966 prohibits use of federal funds for any trans- 
portation project which requires the use of certain public lands 
unless there are no feasible and prudent alternatives to such use. 
It is clear to us from our preliminary review that there are a num- 
ber of properties potentially subject to the 4 (f) process which 
would be adversely impacted by a northern corridor alignment. 
While it is not necessary for us to complete this 4 (f) review be- 
cause the "safety upgrade" solution has no 4 (f) impacts, it is 
nonetheless clear that there would be serious legal and administra- 
tive controversies over the choice of a northern corridor express- 
way or arterial highway, where the existing alignment is so clearly 
preferable from environmental and other policy considerations. 

We believe, then, that the wisest course of action is to 
improve the safety and operating characteristics of the existing 



corridor, confining the project area to the present roadway area 
as much as possible. This conclusion is strongly supported by 
the extensive environmental analysis conducted by the DPW and its 
consultants, as well as the overwhelming testimony at the public 
hearings from elected officials, citizen groups and individuals. 

In reaching this decision, we are mindful of the argu- 
ments put forward by the officials of Lincoln in support of moving 
the road to the northern edge of the Town. They have argued that 
this approach would improve regional access to the open space re- 
sources of Lincoln. In view of the fact that the best known open 
space resource in regional terms will certainly be the Minuteman 
Park, the current location of Route 2, which maximizes the dis- 
tance of the highway from the Park and maintains part of Lincoln's 
excellent conservation lands contiguous to the Park, seems far 
superior for regional access to open space. 

We recognize that the location of Route 2 within Lincoln 
creates hazards for those crossing from one part to the other, as 
well as for those who live directly on Route 2. To respond to 
these problems, we are prepared to work with the Town to develop 
a satisfactory design -- to enhance the aesthetics and safety of 
local pedestrians and vehicular travel time. A grade separated 
interchange at Crosby's Corner, an underpass with no connection 
to Route 2 itself at Bedford Road, a pedestrian overpass to be lo- 
cated between Bedford Road and Crosby's Corner are three steps 
which we could consider. To further improve safety, we are also 
prepared to work with the Town to inhibit development along the 
existing route to prevent new access problems from occurring in 
the future. Finally, back-door access is possible to some of the 
Lincoln streets which currently intersect Route 2, making possible 
the elimination of some of the existing curb cuts which create po- 
tential hazards. We are prepared to work with the Town to develop 
suitable design solutions to these problems. Now that the north- 
ern alignment is ruled out, we hope that more attention to develop- 
ing and maintaining suitable design characteristics will be possi- 
ble, through a combination of construction improvements and zoning 
control. 

3. Regional Transportation Priorities 

Our overall regional strategy is to give first priority to 
improving public transportation, with major public investment orien- 
ted to transit and rail upgrading. In the northwest corridor, the 
Fitchburg Division of the B 5 M commuter service is one which has 
enjoyed an increase in patronage despite deterioration of equipment 
and service. Now that the purchase of the B £ M right of way and 



vehicles is accomplished, the MBTA will begin to improve the road- 
bed and rebuild the cars. In addition, it should be noted that 
the extension of the Red Line to the northwest, which is a major 
policy commitment in this corridor, with major transit funds ear- 
marked, provides for a direct transfer between the B £ M and the 
subway at the planned Porter Square Station. This will vastly 
improve the public transportation access to the Cambridge insti- 
tutional complexes of MIT and Harvard, so important to the employ- 
ment base of the northwestern suburbs. 

Given such large commitments in public transportation, 
we are allocating our scarce highway resources to those road pro- 
jects which directly serve transit or complement transit by pro- 
viding access to areas presently served by roads which are much 
more congested and much less tied to the major highway network, 
rather than to highway projects such as a Route 2 expressway which 
would compete with transit investment. 

It is also obvious that regional transportation policies 
must be consistent with our state and national commitments to ener- 
gy conservation. A new expressway would be inconsistent with this 
goal, as well as with a policy trend toward lower speed limits for 
safety reasons. 

4. Funding Constraints 

For over two years, we have often pointed out that it 
seemed highly improbable that we would have the resources to do 
anything other than a safety upgrade along this stretch of Route 2, 
but we have avoided crystallizing the decision because of a hope 
that different sources of funding might be around the next corner, 
and because it would be improper to make a decision heavily based 
on unavailability of funding if that situation were about to change 
At the same time, there is a strong agreement that safety improve- 
ments along the existing route are appropriate if no major build 
options are likely. 

It is now very clear that the lack of funding capacity to 
carry out a major build in this corridor is a condition likely to 
last into the indefinite future. We, therefore, intend to proceed 
responsibly in the near future to provide for safer operations on 
a roadway which is unlikely to change in a major way in the next 
several decades. 

The federal funding available to Massachusetts for all 
highways other than Interstate are desperately short of our needs. 



10 



We have attempted in the Federal Highway Act of 1976 to increase 
the available funds; we have continued to seek allies in other 
states in this effort; and we have spoken directly to the new 
Secretary of Transportation, Brock Adams, about our needs. Des- 
pite these efforts, it is clear by now that while there may be 
some national support for significant increases in Federal funding 
for special bridge replacements, and for completion of the Inter- 
state Highway network, there is much less support for major im- 
provements in the primary system. 

Route 2 is part of the primary system. Statewide, for 
this system, we have available about $10 million of Federal funds 
annually. These are made available on a 70-30 matching basis. 
We can assume, therefore, that over the next five years, there may 
be in the range of $50 million available for projects in this cat- 
egory. Yet throughout the state, there are projects to improve 
the primary system which would total about nine times this much. 
In other words, estimated revenues exceed estimated project costs 
in this category by about 9 to 1 . 

In this context, the $80 million (in 1973 dollars) esti- 
mated for reconstruction of Route 2 as an expressway would be an 
impossible burden on available funds. This funding constraint, 
which reinforces the transportation and environmental considera- 
tions in the corridor, has been the subject of painstaking review 
for over two years, both in terms of this corridor and the entire 
state, and points a direction with statewide implications. There 
simply is not funding available outside of a few long established 
corridors to create major new rights of way. This fact, as well 
as the major environmental and political opposition to such action, 
underlies the basic reality of roadway improvements over the next 
decade. We must concentrate principally on protection of existing 
rights of way from erosion by development, with excessive curb cuts 
reducing the safety and capacity of roadways over time, and on up- 
grading of existing situations by careful and modest improvements 
in response to specific problems. 

5. Other Considerations 

In an attempt to deal with the funding constraints, Lin- 
coln officials and others have asked us to consider stretching out 
the Route 2 project over a decade or two and constructing it incre- 
mentally. The first step, they urge, would be acquiring land in 
Lincoln for the northern alignment, concurrently with minor safety 
improvements on the existing road. This would be followed by con- 
struction on this new alignment. Later, the Concord and Acton 
sections would be reconstructed as expressways, if safety and con- 



11 



gestion seemed to require such treatment a decade or so from now. 

This proposal is fundamentally inconsistent with environ- 
mental requirements, as set forth in the environmental analysis 
and in a broad range of comments at the public hearing. Indeed, 
a ''slow build" solution to Route 2 through Lincoln would have the 
worst possible total impact on the environment. For years, as 
land takings and then clearance and finally construction began in 
the northern corridor, the area would become a wasteland, with 
direct impacts on the noise, air, water and visual qualities of 
the vicinity. The Cambridge water supply, Minuteman Park, and 
the neighborhoods would be negatively affected by both the existing 
road and the long drawn-out preparations for the new road. There 
is a substantial chance, moreover, that existing Route 2 would 
never be "recycled" back into a smaller scale town road, as Lin- 
coln proposed, and that the area would end up with both the existing 
four- lane road and the new one. Finally, the "slow build" pro- 
posal seems predicated on the assumption that eventually the big 
build decision would prevail in Concord, which means that the en- 
vironmental impacts of that decision would have to be weighed now. 
In short, environmental impacts of a "slow build" decision are too 
serious to allow us to select it and still comply with the letter 
and the spirit of Federal and state environmental requirements. 

Aside from environmental requirements as such, we must be 
fair to the people affected. It is our conclusion that a "slow 
build" approach to Route 2 would be grossly unfair to the people 
who would be most directly impacted in all the towns for the entire 
12-mile length of the project. 

A cloud of uncertainty would continue to exist for many 
years to come -- for those in the present corridor and for those 
in the path of the proposed northern alignment. Farmstands and 
other roadside businesses in Concord and elsewhere on Route 2 would 
be in a constant state of not knowing exactly how fast the project 
would proceed and whether they should make improvements, stay as 
they are, or move. The same is true of residents. Home values 
are already affected, sales are difficult, household plans are un- 
settled. The "slow build" proposal is really no decision at all, 
postponing for years the hard choices and misleading everyone in 
the meantime. 

Our responsibility as public officials require us to be 
as clear as possible in situations like this. Uncertainty itself 
is disruptive. We believe it is fairer to say clearly that Route 
2 will not be moved than that it might be moved or it might be re- 



12 



constructed at some time in the future. There have been enough 
studies and enough uncertainty on this issue. 

We believe it is wiser for us to make the basic choices 
now, so that all interested parties can know where they stand and 
hopefully cooperate toward a common goal. 



EXHIBIT B 



July 29, 1977 



Honorable Frederick P. Salvucci 
Secretary, Executive Office of 

Transportation and Construction 
John W. McCormack Office Building 
One Ashburton Place - 16th Floor 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Re: Route 2 in Lincoln 

Dear Mr. Secretary: 

Reference is made to your recent decision with respect to 
Route 2 in the Towns of Acton, Concord and Lincoln, and the reasons 
therefor, as set forth by you in your Memorandum dated June 27, 1977 
and in our meeting of June 22, 1977. 

That decision, so far as it affects Route 2 in Lincoln, is 
terribly wrong and, indeed, disastrous. It is neither supported by 
nor responsive to the transportation and environmental data bearing 
upon the issue in Lincoln; and it is wholly unresponsive to and in- 
consistent with thoughtful land use planning efforts of great im- 
portance not only to Lincoln but also to the metropolitan Boston 
area and the Commonwealth at large. 

While you pay lip-service to the areas of concern of the 
Environmental Impact Study (the "EIS") , your decision essentially 



13 



ignores the basic data developed with respect to the Lincoln alter- 
natives studied and reflects no effort to weigh and compare the 
relative impacts attendant with each alternative in Lincoln. 

The traffic projections made in the course of the EIS 
assumed successful implementation of mass transit programs. Even 
on this assumption, the EIS clearly established that: 

(1) A substantial part of the traffic on Route 2 in 
Lincoln involves trips that cannot be served by any existing or con- j 
templated mass transit alternative. For example, the origin and 
destination studies conducted in the course of the EIS indicates 
substantial traffic on Route 2 travels to and from Route 128 and 
points to the north and south along Route 128, as well as to and 
from the industrial areas north and northeast of Hanscom Field. 

(2) If Route 2A were to be closed to through traffic, 
the present road in Lincoln would not meet transportation needs. 
Your statement that Route 2A must be dealt with separately from the 
major Route 2 options is incredible in light of the substantial in- 
crease in traffic on Route 2 in Lincoln that would result from a 
closing of Route 2A. That impact is clearly set forth in the EIS 
but is ignored by you. You suggest that some time in the future 
Route 2A might be closed without overloading Route 2. Again, this 
is gross speculation contradicted by the data developed in the EIS. 
Accordingly, the future of Route 2A is a significant issue to be 
dealt with in resolving the disposition of Route 2 in Lincoln. All 
participants in the EIS have recognized this to be true. So long 

as through traffic continues in the present Route 2 corridor in Lin- j 
coin, considerations of safety, proper circulation of local traffic 
and the avoidance of a build-up of through traffic on local roads 
require that Lincoln do everything within its power to prevent any 
closing of Route 2A to through traffic. That is a necessary conse- 
quence of your decision. 

(3) If Route 2A remained open to through traffic, cer- 
tain sections of the present road in Lincoln would still not meet 
transportation needs. One of these sections is the area east of 
Crosby's Corner, where the grade and alignment of the road impair 
the steady flow of traffic, particularly truck traffic. Your inten- 
tion to rebuild this area of the road, with a grade separated inter- 
change at Crosby's Corner, and your willingness to construct an un- 
derpass at Bedford Road are obviously designed to increase the traf- 
fic-carrying capacity of the existing road and. indeed, are an ad- 
mission that the present road in Lincoln is not adequate to serve 
transportation needs even if one assumes no closing of Route 2A and 
the implementation of an aggressive mass transit policy. 



14 



In fact, the transportation data clearly shows a need to 
do much more than a minimum safety upgrade in Lincoln and further 
that such effort would not supplant any mass transit alternative 
but is required as part of a balanced transportation program for 
this area. 

One need not be an expert to see and understand that pres- 
ent Route 2 in Lincoln does not have the carrying capacity that 
present Route 2 has to the east and west of Lincoln. Moreover, any 
action reasonably designed to effect significant safety improvements 
in Lincoln and still permit reasonable circulation of local traffic 
would necessarily further reduce the carrying capacity of the pres- 
ent road. 

Your call for additional guardrails, prevention of further 
curb cuts and possible acquisition of access rights in Lincoln 
acknowledges that the existing conflict between local and through 
traffic in the present corridor is already severe. These suggest- 
ions do not represent any reasonable long-term solution to a diffi- 
cult problem. They are emergency tourniquets which will inevitably 
cut off local circulation in favor of more and high speed through 
traffic. As to the matter of prohibiting future curb cuts, the EIS 
considered the matter of undeveloped land whose only road frontage 
was existing Route 2. From that data you can easily see that pre- 
venting curb cuts necessarily means either taking the land outright 
or building service roads parallel to Route 2. There is no other 
prudent or feasible alternative. "Back-door access", as suggested 
on page 8 of your Memorandum, would be prohibitively expensive and 
involve substantially adverse environmental impacts. In light of 
the data developed in the course of the EIS, your suggestion as to 
the access problem is, at best, naive and raises a substantial ques- 
tion as to the credibility of your approach to the whole problem. 

When one considers all that you propose or are willing to 
do in Lincoln in response to the special factors that prevail there - 
a grade separated interchange at Crosby's Corner, changing the grade 
and the alignment of the road east of that location, an underpass at 
Bedford Road, guardrails and elimination of access - one inevitably 
comes to the conclusion that you will have gone far in creating a 
limited access expressway in the present corridor. And all for a 
road you say is presently adequate for projected transportation 
needs! Perhaps present Route 2 is adequate in Acton and Concord. 
It is clearly not so in Lincoln and you would have certainly been 
more candid with us and the public at large, and more consistent with 
the EIS, had you directly acknowledged this fact. 



15 



Beyond this, the cost of all that you propose be done in 
Lincoln - what has been previously described and the environmental 
improvement referred to on page 6 of your Memorandum - will be far 
greater than the cost of an arterial in the northern corridor. In 
these circumstances, you must understand how difficult it is for us 
to accept your recurring statements relative to unavailability of 
funds as statements made in good faith. In fact, the availability 
of funds is not so much a cause for the decision but a consequence 
of the decision - a reflection of a highly subjective view of pri- 
orities. If the transportation, environmental and land use factors 
prevailing with respect to Route 2 in Lincoln were given the ob- 
jective consideration they merit, we have no doubt that funds would 
be available to build an arterial in the northern corridor. 

Moreover, in dealing with the money aspects of the issue 
you have consistently begged the question. As expressed in your 
Memorandum, you have tied the relocation of the road in Lincoln to 
a "major build" or an expressway solution throughout the three 
Towns. There is nothing in the building of a substitute arterial 
in a northern corridor in Lincoln that requires an expressway solu- 
tion in Concord or Acton. Indeed, going to a northern arterial in 
Lincoln would make Route 2 in Lincoln consistent with the character 
of Route 2 in Concord and Acton. Those public officials who op- 
posed the expressway solution at the public hearing on the EIS were 
opposing an expressway solution throughout the three Towns at a 
cost of over $70,000,000. They were not opposing a $10-$15,000,000 
project in Lincoln. Nor were those officials opposing a proposal 
to substitute a new road for two existing roads where that substitu- 
tion would be the most cost-effective means of solving transporta- 
tion and land use problems. In this connection, you have consist- 
ently treated our proposal as involving only a new road, when in 
fact what we have sought is a substitute for two existing roads, 
both of which would be closed to through traffic. Again in your 
Memorandum you denigrate the prospect of closing the existing road 
to through traffic once Route 2 is relocated. That comment is nei- 
ther fair nor reasonable in light of the fact that we have proposed 
to you an interdiction of the present road which your own people 
will tell you is easily and economically achievable. Frankly, we 
believe that rather than dealing objectively with the special con- 
ditions that prevail in Lincoln with respect to Route 2, you have 
artificially framed the problem and evoked a response from certain 
officials which bears little, if any, relationship to the merits of 
the northern corridor decision made by the Commonwealth in 1966 and 
of what we propose be done in that corridor, the present corridor 
and Route 2A. 



16 



Your statements with respect to the environmental impact 
of a road in the northern corridor, and, in particular, that such 
a road would "badly affect" the Hobbs Brook Reservoir, are not sup- 
ported by the EIS. Such a road would involve the taking of only 
a small portion of the entire watershed area and would pose no 
threat to the storage capacity of the watershed or to the quantity 
of water available to Cambridge. This has been conceded to us by 
Cambridge. 

Nor would the relocated road pose any threat to the qual- 
ity of Cambridge water. The threat to water quality is road salt. 
This is an operational and management problem. The problem exists 
in the present corridor as well as in the proposed corridor, and, 
indeed it exists with greater intensity along Route 128, which is 
the primary source of salts coming into the Reservoir. As you 
also know, the present road traverses more of the watershed area in 
closer proximity to the Reservoir than would a road in the northern 
corridor. To this extent, continuance of through traffic in the 
present corridor poses a greater threat to the quality of Cambridge 
water than would a relocated road. In any event, a serious concern 
for the quality of Cambridge water on the part of the Commonwealth 
should be evidenced by a discontinuance of the use of road salt in 
proximity to the reservoirs and watershed area and not by a re- 
jection of an alignment which by itself poses no greater and probab- 
ly a lesser threat to water quality than maintenance of the status 
quo. 

You appear to make much of presumed adverse impacts in 
the process of construction. Indeed, you mischaracterize a sug- 
gestion we made (in response to funding constraints) as a "slow 
build" that would allegedly aggravate the impact during construction, 
We never proposed to you that construction in this area be attenua- 
ted. We did propose that the Commonwealth complete the acquisition 
program and then, when additional funds became available, begin and 
complete the construction phase of the project in a normal manner. 
In any event, the EIS establishes that any disruption of the area 
during construction need not have any lasting adverse consequence 
and that with a reasonable level of care during construction there 
would be no significant adverse impact. 

Your own suggestion for construction of a closed drainage 
system on the existing road in the Hobbs Brook watershed area in- 
volves disruption of a part of that area more sensitive than that 
traversed by a relocated road. Surely you would not be proposing 
such effort if you, in fact, believed that construction activity 
necessarily had any significant adverse impact on the quantity or 
quality of water. 



17 



What is apparent from the EIS is that the impact on the 
quantity and quality of Cambridge water of a northern alignment is 
likely to be no more adverse than the impact on water quantity or 
quality attendant with continued use of the present road for through 
traffic. It is our belief that a northern relocation combined with 
an interdiction of existing Route 2 to preclude through traffic 
would result in a net improvement of the storage capacity of the 
watershed and an improvement in water quality, in light of Lincoln's 
ability to refrain from the use of road salt. 

As to other environmental impacts, we call to your atten- 
tion the following, again on the basis of the EIS. 

The noise level in Minute Man Park as a consequence of 
through traffic on Route 2A is higher than the limit regarded as 
permissible for a National Park. The noise level in Lincoln con- 
servation land abutting present Route 2 is likewise higher than the 
permissible level as a consequence of through traffic on the exist- 
ing road. In certain sections of the existing road, noise levels 
exceed the limit regarded as permissible for residential use, again 
as a consequence of the traffic. Your decision to maintain through 
traffic where it is on both Routes 2 and 2A in Lincoln perpetuates 
these existing adverse impacts and assures that they will get worse. 
The EIS noise study indicates clearly that a sensitively designed 
arterial in a northern corridor below the Park would substantially 
reduce noise, for the Park and for the residents of the Town in both 
the existing corridor and near the proposed corridor, well below per- 
missible levels. The National Park Service acknowledged this when 
it advised you in our presence of its willingness to accept a north- 
erly alignment. 

It is true that a portion of Lincoln conservation land is 
traversed by a northern corridor. But it is also true that a larg- 
er and more usable portion of Lincoln conservation land is bisected 
by the existing road. Comparing and weighing these impacts, one 
against the other, it was and is the judgment of our Conservation 
Commission that the impact of a road in the northern corridor on our 
conservation land and Open Space Plan is minimal and, indeed, that 
such road provides an over-all net benefit in terms of our conserva- 
tion land and Open Space Plan. There is nothing in the record that 
provides a basis for contradicting that judgment. 

We also note that apart from the piece of Lincoln conserva- 
tion land above referred to, the only other parcel in the northern 
corridor subject to 4 (f) protection is part of a property acquired 
by the National Park Service, which part has never been and is not 
now intended for Park use and would be exchanged for Lincoln land 



18 



abutting the Park if the relocation is effected. By way of con- 
trast, the EIS shows that much more property entitled to 4 (f) pro- 
tection is located in the existing corridor. That property is 
adversely affected by existing conditions and will be more severely 
affected by the increase in through traffic conservatively pro- 
jected in the EIS. 

That your decision reflects no serious weighing of the 
special facts which bear upon the resolution of the Route 2 prob- 
lem in Lincoln and the data developed in the EIS is egregious. 
That it should also be wholly unresponsive to existing local land 
use plans, current regional land use planning efforts and the Com- 
monwealth's interest in economic development is disastrous. By 
rejecting for all time a northerly relocation of Route 2 in Lincoln 
and committing the existing corridor to through traffic, the de- 
cision severely impairs existing plans and planning efforts and de- 
prives Lincoln and other towns in the area as well as the Common- 
wealth of an important element, and flexibility, in achieving the 
highest and best use of land in the area. 

Your rejection of the regional importance of Lincoln's 
Open Space Plan is somewhat cavalier in light of the fact that it 
is the product of many years of land use planning, going back to 
1954, undertaken by the citizens of the Town with the assistance of 
planners of national reputation. In fact that Plan provides a 
vital link between Minute Man National Park and the Walden Reserva- 
tion and represents an important part of the Bay Circuit established 
by the General Court many years ago. If you commit the existing 
corridor in Lincoln to through traffic you are perpetuating a sub- 
stantial impairment to that link and depriving the metropolitan area 
of the opportunity to benefit from what would be an enormous open 
space resource. 

You apparently recognize the national significance of 
Minute Man National Park, yet for some reason you fail to see that 
the continuance of through traffic on Route 2A substantially impairs 
the ability of the Park Service to recreate the atmosphere of Colon- 
ial America; and you are unwilling to recognize the obvious fact 
that relocation of that through traffic to a Route 2 in the northern 
corridor would enable the Park Service to accomplish that objective 
without adverse impact to the citizens of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, along with other Towns in the area, and Massport 
are about to engage in a significant land use planning effort in the 
context of the Hanscom Task Force. From time to time over the past 
few years many proposals have been made as to appropriate uses of 



19 



land owned by Massport at Hanscom. Such proposals have involved 
office buildings, research-oriented industry, motel or hotels and, 
more recently, a regional solid waste-resource recovery facility. 
The feasibility of most prospective uses depends on good access by 
road, access that will not adversely impact on local streets. A 
Route 2 relocated to a northern corridor would permit such access 
and is necessary to achieving a successful land use plan for Hans- 
com. 

In this connection, we understand that the Governor re- 
cently visited Environmental Research $ Technology, Inc., a company 
located in close proximity to Hanscom, in pursuit of his efforts to 
attract jobs and improve the Commonwealth's business climate. That 
company currently needs better road access and has proposed certain 
road improvements in Lincoln. That proposal and, indeed, the com- 
pany's existence in the area have not been welcomed by residents of 
the area because of the impact on local streets. A Route 2 relo- 
cated to a northern corridor in Lincoln would provide substantially 
improved access for this company and permit us to avoid adversely 
impacting local streets. This situation offers a prime example of 
how your decision runs contrary to intelligent land use planning 
efforts and deprives not only Lincoln but the region and the Common- 
wealth of the opportunity to do effective land use planning. 

In these circumstances we do not believe it fair or proper 
that your decision rejecting the relocation of Route 2 in Lincoln be 
treated as a final decision or that any action be taken by the Com- 
monwealth which would irreversibly commit the existing corridor to 
through traffic. In particular, we ask that no action be taken to 
sell land heretofore acquired in the northern corridor, to create a 
grade-separated interchange at Crosby's Corner or to change the align- 
ment or grade of present Route 2 east of Crosby's Corner. We point 
out that the combined impacts of such changes in the existing corri- 
dor coupled with a safety upgrade along the balance of the road in 
Lincoln were not studied as part of the EIS. Accordingly, such 
changes cannot be lawfully effected on the present record. 

We request assurance from you that this Administration 
will not make any such changes and will not sell the land heretofore 
acquired in the northern corridor. 

We do not believe that our opposition to the finality of 
your decision or the Commonwealth's restraint from imposing that de- 
cision is unfair. We believe both to be required by existing facts 
and the current status of land use planning efforts in the area af- 
fected. In addition, we must point out that in 1966, after much 



20 



analysis, debate and public hearings, the Commonwealth had decided 
in favor of a northern corridor in Lincoln. Since that time and 
in reliance on that decision, there has been significant residential 
development in the present corridor. Moreover, those who purchased 
homes in or adjacent to the northern corridor since 1966 did so with 
full knowledge of, and certain benefits resulting from, that de- 
cision. These circumstances create equities that support a decis- 
ion to resist which, on other grounds herein discussed, is in the 
best interest of the Town, the region and the Commonwealth. 

We are willing, as we have always been willing, to work 
with the Department of Public Works in effecting safety improvements 
on the present road. In this connection we have waited for more 
than two years for a response from the Department to proposals Lin- 
coln has made and a communication from the Department of its own 
suggestions. We agree that enforcement of the speed limit is 
critical and have urged this in the past, along with other actions. 
Of course, you have more influence than we do in seeing to it that 
the State Police enforce the speed limit on a continuing basis. 
What we do oppose are those improvements which are called safety 
improvements but which, in reality, are designed to enable the pres- 
ent road to carry greater volumes of traffic at higher speeds and 
thereby result in additional safety problems. 

While we recognize your strong and consistent views on 
this subject, we nevertheless ask that you review your decision so 
far as it affects Route 2 in Lincoln in light of the matters raised 
in this letter. We are also asking the Governor to review that de- 
cision. 

Yours very truly, 

Robert M. Gargill 
Harold A. Levey, Jr. 
Ann F. Sutherland 



cc: Honorable Michael S. Dukakis, Governor 
Commissioner John J. Carroll 



21 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



Term Expires 



Kenneth W. Bergen 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 



Robert M. Gargill 
Ann F. Sutherland 
Harold A. Levey, Jr. 



Richard Wengren 



MODERATOR 

TOWN CLERK 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Chairman 

TOWN TREASURER 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Joseph W. Howard 

Evan Y. Semerjian 

Douglas M. Rurckett, Chairman 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



Richard Wengren 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Priscilla Damon 

Robert Frank 

Roger M. Barzun 

James W. Spindler 

Lynn Donaldson, Chairman 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 
John R. H. Kimball 
Frederick M. Tingley 
Stuart B. Avery, Jr., Chairman 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
William Stason, M. D. 
George P. Faddoul, D. V. M. 
Herbert A. Haessler, M. D. , Chairman 



1978 



1978 



1979 
1980 
1978 



1978 



1979 
1980 
1978 



1980 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1978 



1980 
1979 
1978 



1978 
1979 
1980 



22 



Term Expires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Dante Germanotta 
David M. Ford 
Richard F. Brooks 
Richard H. Davison 
Ronald L. Blecher, Vice-Chairman 
Joan W. Wofford, Chairman 



1978 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1979 
1979 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Vincent N. Merrill 

H. Arnold Mac Lean 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 



1978 
1979 
1980 



PLANNING BOARD 



Robert C. Brannen 

John R. Caswell 

Ann P. Brown 

James D. Birkett 

David M. Donaldson, Chairman 



1982 
1981 
1980 
1979 
1978 



John B. Garrison 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



1978 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



Archer desCognets 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



1979 
1980 
1978 



Thomas B. Adams 
Nancy B. Ellis 
Rebecca B. Chase 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



1978 
1979 
1980 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Francis H. Gleason 

Nancy S. Hammond 

Martha DeNormandie, Chairman 



Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 



Kenton J. Ide 
Carolyn Birmingham 
Katherine S. Bolt 



(Selectmen Appointee) 
(School Committee Appointee) 
(Elected by the Town) 



1978 
1979 
1980 



23 



Term Expires 

DeCORDOVA AMD DANA MUSEUM AND P ARK 

"A" Directors 

Gerard L. Kirby 1981 

John Pike 1978 

Gregory Kolligian 1979 

Walter J. Salmon 1980 

"B" Directors 



Robert B. Newman (Selectmen Appointee) 1978 

Owen Beenhouwer (School Committee Appointee) 1980 

Chester d'Autremont, M. D. , Chairman 

(Library Trustees Appointee) 1979 

RECREATION C OMMITTEE 

Leo J. Algeo (Elected by Town) 1978 

Frederick Richardson (Elected by Town) 1980 

Louis H. Mutschler, M. D., Chairman (Elected by Town) 1979 

Mary Silverstein (Selectmen Appointee) 1978 

Virginia M. Miles (Resigned) (Selectmen Appointee) 1979 

Gregory McDonald (Appointed) (Selectmen Appointee) 1979 

Eleanor T. King (Selectmen Appointee) 1980 

TREE WARDEN 

Russell L. Barnes 1978 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 
J. Timothy Grobleski 1978 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Betty L. Lang 1979 

CLERK TO SELECTMEN 
Elizabeth J. Snelling 1978 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Richard P. Carroll 1978 



24 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 



POLICE SERGEANT 



PATROLMAN- INSPECTOR 



POLICE OFFICERS 



CONSTABLES 



Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 
David Davis 
Steven Ziegler 



Allen Bowles 
James Blackburn 
David Finan 
John Fitzgerald 
Richard J. Hallett 
Thomas Moran 



Dominick James Arena 
Charles E. Doyle 

Steven Ziegler 

Laura Perry 

Dominick James Arena 

Thomas W. Coan 



Dominick James Arena 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Stephen Coan (Resigned) 
Ernest L. Johnson (Appointed) 



SPECIAL 


CONSTABLE 


DOG OFFICER 


FIRE 


CHIEF 


PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 


FOREST WARDEN 



Term Expires 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Ernest L. Johnson 



1978 
1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 
1978 



1978 



25 



William M. Dean 



Russell J. Dixon 



WIRING INSPECTOR 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENS E 
AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Warren F. Flint 



AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 



DEPUTY DIRECTORS OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 



Ernest L. Johnson 
Eveleth R. Todd 



Term Expires 
1978 
1978 

1978 

1978 



1978 
1978 



COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



Eric Williams 



ASSISTANT COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 



Dana W. Atchley, Jr. 



Alan McClennen 
Henry Morgan 
Muriel Weckstein 



William B. Whalen 



William B. Whalen 



William N. Swift 



Margaret M. Martin 



FENCE VIEWERS 



VETERANS' AGENT 



VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 



TOWN COUNSEL 



TOWN HISTORIAN 



1978 



1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 



1978 



26 



Term Expires 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



Harold E. Lawson 

William G. Langton 

Peggy G. Elliott 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, ex officio 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1978 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Abigail Avery 

Louise Meeks 

Esther Shapiro 

Beverly Smith (Resigned) 

Beverly Eckhardt 

Charlotte Barnaby 

Harry Healey, Jr. 

Clifford Bowles 

Claire Pearmain 

Alan McClennen 

Enid Winchell 

Margaret Kirkpatrick 



1979 
1979 
1979 
1979 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1980 
1980 



MINUTEMAN HOME CARE CORPORATION 



Abigail Avery, Director 

Alice Garrison, Alternate Director 



1978 
1978 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



C. Russel Hansen, Jr. 



1978 



Frederic J. Eppling 
Gun i Ida Grover 
Gregory Kolligian 
Harold E. Lawson 



AIRPORT COMMUNITY COUNCIL 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



John Quincy Adams 

James DeNormandie 

Lydia H. Dane 

Kemon P. Taschioglou 

Frederick B. Taylor 

William M. Preston 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 



1979 
1979 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1980 
1980 



REPRESENTATIVE TO 
METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



John R. Caswell 



1980 



27 



Term Expires 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Barbara Barker 
Robert W. Jevon 
Hans vanLeer 
David F. Sykes 
Peter Meenan, Chairman 



1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, BOARD OF APPEALS 



D'Arcy MacMahon 
Jane C. Williams 



1978 
1980 



REPRESENTATIVE TO 
GOVERNOR'S TASK FORCE ON HANSCOM FIELD 



R. Langdon Wales 



1978 



REPRESENTATIVE ON 
WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



John Quincy Adams 



1978 



REPRESENTATIVE ON 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 



John B. Garrison 



1978 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Margaret Wengren 
John Todd 
Sumner Smith 
Elizabeth Donaldson 
Ruth Wales, Chairman 



1978 
1979 
1980 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Jon Barry 

Albert Nelson 

William Rizzo 

Donna Burt 

Sarah Stevenson, Chairman 



1978 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1979 



PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD 



Margaret Domenichella 
John R. Snelling 



1978 
1978 



Abigail Cheever 
James Barnet 
James Faran 
John Stevenson 



PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



28 



Term Expires 



TRANSFER STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 



Michael Belanger 
Annette Rosen (Resigned) 
Henry Rugo 
Henry Harrison, Chairman 



REPRESENTATIVE TO 



128 WEST RESOURCE RECOVERY COUNCIL 



Ruth Ann Hendrickson (Resigned) 
Henry Harrison (Appointed) 



RELOCATION COMMITTEE 



Carol Elwood 

Eleanor Fitzgerald 

Guido Perera 

Elmer H. Ziegler 

George R. Kornfeld, Chairman 



Cecilia Ives 
John Ritsher 
Jean Smith 
Lex H. Taylor 
Patricia Morse 



LINCOLN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMMITTEE 



Chairman 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



SWIMMING POOL COMMITTEE 



Virginia O'Brien 
Ann B. Paddock 
Albert Reed 
Mary Terrell 
Kay Yeuell 
Gregory McDonald 
Harry Hadley, Chairman 



INSURANCE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Alexander B. Ellis 
John Hammond 
John B. Sharpe 
Howard Ward (Resigned) 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



LEXINGTON AREA TRANSIT 
IMPROVEMENT STUDY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Paul Travers, Delegate 

James Spindler, Alternate Delegate 



1978 
1978 



29 



Term Expires 



LAND CONFERENCE STEERING COMMITTEE 



Robert Allen 

Peter Adams 

Susan Brooks 

Ann Coburn 

Eleanor Fitzgerald 

Henry Morgan 

Leo Palmer 

Roger Taunton- Rigby 

Katharine S. White 

Colin Smith 

Joan Kimball, Chairman 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



SEPTIC DISPOSAL STUDY COMMITTEE 



Ruth Barbarow 
Basil Gray 
Roy Raja 



1978 
1978 
1978 



SPECIAL POLICE 



John Quincy Adams 
Leo J. Algeo 
Sam Ameen 
Raymond Barnes 
Donald Bardsley 
Gary C. Bardsley 
Russell L. Barnes 
Robert H. Booth 
Joseph Bozak 
Roland Bumpus 
Ann M. Campobasso 
Joseph Campobasso 
Vincent Caracciolo 
Richard P. Carroll 
Daniel A. Cheever 
Edward Chisholm 
John Ciraso 
Paul Ciraso 
Stephen Coan 
John Comeau 
Arthur Cotoni 
Joseph Cotoni 
Lorraine Dean 
William M. Dean 
James DeNormandie 
Dennis Deeb 
Peter M. Dewey 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



30 





Term Expires 


SPECIAL POLICE (Continued) 




William R. Doherty 


1978 


John J. Doyle 


1978 


Robert Dubreuil 


1978 


William Erickson 


1978 


James Finnerty 


1978 


Warren F. Flint 


1978 


Robert M. Gargill 


1978 


John B. Garrison 


1978 


Richard Goddard 


1978 


Frank W. Gordon 


1978 


Frank W. Gordon, Jr. 


1978 


Elliott V. Grabill 


1978 


J. Timothy Grobleski 


1978 


Lawrence P. Hallett 


1978 


Daniel Hart 


1978 


Frank Hidinger 


1978 


Wayne R. Hingston 


1978 


Richard Hodgson 


1978 


George J. Hofferty 


1978 


Stuart Hildreth 


1978 


Sherman Howard 


1978 


Christopher Ireland, Jr. 


1978 


Ernest L. Johnson 


1978 


Thomas Kasprzak 


1978 


Harry B. Knowles, III 


1978 


Harold E. Lawson 


1978 


Robert A. Lemire 


1978 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 


1978 


Joseph Lenox 


1978 


Daniel Lemerise 


1978 


David J. Maher 


1978 


Gerald Mahoney 


1978 


William Maitland 


1978 


Henry Manuel 


1978 


Robert Marshall 


1978 


Paul V. McGovern 


1978 


John W. McLellan 


1978 


Michael Moran 


1978 


Thomas Moreau 


1978 


Dennis Murphy 


1978 


John O'Loughlin 


1978 


William Orpik 


1978 


Louis J. Papea 


1978 


Richard A. Pazzano 


1978 


William M. Preston 


1978 



31 





Term Expires 


SPECIAL POLICE (Continued) 




Barry M. Real 


1978 


E. Don Ian Rooney 


1978 


Guy Richardson 


1978 


John B. Roberts 


1978 


William C. Ryan 


1978 


Gordon F. Smith 


1978 


Sumner Smith 


1978 


Robert Sniffin 


1978 


Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 


1978 


Ann F. Sutherland 


1978 


Kemon P. Taschioglou 


1978 


George Thomas 


1978 


Walter Van Wart 


1978 


Henry Warner 


1978 


William B. Whalen 


1978 


William B. Whalen, Jr. 


1978 


Arthur Wickey 


1978 


David Williams 


1978 


Eric A. Williams 


1978 


Susan Ziegler 


1978 



JURY LIST 



Name 



Address 



Occupation 



Alman, John E. , III 
Bair, Sophie 
Barbarow, Ruth 
Beal, Bruce A. 
Bockoven, Peter M. 
Booth, William N. 
Bowden, John J. 
Bradley, Louise W. 
Brennan, Eleanor A. 
Burt, William F. 
Cassidy, Robert E. 
Champeny, John 
Church, Robert T. 
Cibel, Stanley A. 
Constantine, Katherine 
Cook, Maureen S. 
Corcoran, Robert P. 
Dalrymple, Barbara 
Dane, Roger 
Darling, Eugene M. , Jr, 



Tower Road 
Morningside Lane 
Old Sudbury Road 
Old Winter Street 
South Great Road 
Old Concord Road 
Concord Road 
Chestnut Circle 
Morningside Lane 
Long Meadow Road 
Bypass Road 
South Great Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Beaver Pond Road 
Bedford Road 
North Great Road 
Old Winter Street 
South Great Road 
Twin Pond Lane 
Boyce Farm Road 



Contractor 

Housewife 

Tech. Illus. 

Investments 

Maintenance 

Inv. Analyst 

Camera Tech. 

DCM Eng. 

Housewife 

Vice Pres. 

Retired 

Exec. Physic: 

Marine Eng. 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Clerk 

Ins. Sales 

Secretary 

Banking 

Scientist 



32 



JURY LIST (Continued) 



Name 

DeBaryshe, Paul G. 
Dickey, Dana H. 
Drew, Frederick T. 
Dust in, Daniel E. 
Everett, Robert R. 
Faran, Ellen G. 
Goldstein, Martin 
Haggerty, John S. 
Hatsopoulos, John N. 
Hawkinson, Lowell B. 
Heller, Madeline M. 
Hester, Leon B. 
Hidinger, Phyllis 
Kelleher, Thomas E. 
Kj el lander, Mary H. 
Koumantzelis, Arthur G 
Leinwand, C. Martin 
Lindsay, Margot C. 
Loughlin, Leona K. 
Lynch, Edward J. 
Lynde, Pamela A. 
Madio, Frederick R. 
Mannarino, Florence A. 
Martin, Margaret M. 
McKennan, Alice W. 
McKissock, Julia C. 
Merritt, Bruce E. 
Millard, David K. 
Mrakovich, David J. 
Mukhitarian, Stephanie 
Nardone, Anthony B. 
Neily, Clark M. , Jr. 
Onigman, Marc P. 
Page, Elisabeth H. 
Paglierani, Lawrence A 
Paine, Mary C. 
Panetta, Rita I. 
Parsons, Robert T. 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr. 
Roy, Eugene U. 
Smyth, Robert R. 
Solman, Fred J., Ill 
Stevens, Edmund, Jr. 
Stevenson, John P. 



Address 

Sunnyside Lane 
Tower Road 
Concord Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Tower Road 
Partridge Lane 
Woodcock Lane 
Morningside Lane 
Aspen Circle 
Bedford Road 
Old Bedford Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Sunnyside Lane 
Round Hill Road 
Chestnut Circle 
Todd Pond Road 
Old Bedford Road 
Wells Road 
Concord Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
South Great Road 
Old Concord Road 
Wells Road 
Conant Road 
Twin Pond Lane 
Bypass Road 
Tower Road 
Goose Pond Road 
Old Cambridge Tpke 
Codman Road 
South Great Road 
Bedford Lane 
Wil larch Road 
Page Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
South Great Road 
Morningside Lane 
Lincoln Road 
Sandy Pond Road 
Weston Road 



Occupation 

Physicist 

Physicist 

Antique Dlr. 

Engineer 

Elec. Engr. 

Housewife 

Ale. Counsel 

Scientist 

Vice Pres. 

Res. Staff 

Secretary 

Engineer 

Homemaker 

Bk. Examiner 

Retail Store 

CPA 

Executive 

Housewife 

Library Asst. 

Artist 

Lab . Techn . 

Engineer 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Teacher 

Coach 

TV Producer 

Bus. Executive 

Student 

Operator 

Sales Eng. 

Eng. Cons. 

Admin. Asst. 

Housewife 

Broker 

Res. Tech. 

Housewife 

Business 

Investments 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Architect 

Mgt. Cons. 



33 



Name 

Titus, William A. 
Torode, Stephen D. 
Torti, Maurice L., Jr, 
Vockel, Virginia 
Von Mertens , Peter B. 
Welch, L. June 
White, Thomas J. 
Witherby, Thomas H. 



JURY LIST (Continued) 

Address 

Old Concord Road 
Conant Road 
Weston Road 
Bedford Road 
Tower Road 
Bedford Road 
Round Hill Road 
Huckleberry Hill 



Occupation 

Insurance 

Farrier 

Scientist 

Ind. Psch. 

Explorer 

Housewife 

Contractor 

Consultant 



APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 



Roberta M. Page 
Nancy Zuelke 



ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS 



Term Expires 



1978 
1978 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 



Virginia M. Niles 



ASSISTANT TREASURER 



1978 



Madge K. Fisher 



ASSISTANT COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



1978 



APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



BURIAL AGENT 



Elizabeth J. Snelling 



1978 



Laura Perry 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



1978 



34 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 



Term Expires 



PERSONNEL BOARD 
John Ritsher 
Winthrop Walker 
Virginia Vockel, Chairman 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Arthur L. Coburn, III 
William C. Munroe, Jr. (Resigned) 
Charlotte Friel (Appointed) 
Lawrence Thompson 
Edward S. Dewey 
Ann F. Sutherland (Resigned) 
William Williams, Jr., Chairman (Appointed) 



1979 
1980 
1978 



1978 
1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1978 
1978 



VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Ruth Wales 



1980 



PIERCE PARK COMMITTEE 



Elizabeth Corcoran 

Margaret Flint 

William A. King 

Margot Lindsay 

Aulikki Olsen 

William Shea 

Henry M. Morgan, Chairman 



1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 
Edith Mar 

Charles W. Calkins, Jr., D. M. D. (Resigned) 
Saville R. Davis, Chairman 
Daniel Cheever, Jr., ex officio 



1978 
1979 
1980 






35 



Term Expires 



APPOINTED BY PLANNING BOARD 



BICYCLE PATH COMMITTEE 

Marda Post Mayo 1980 

Edmund Stevens, Jr. 1980 

Michael Farny ^979 

John R. Snelling 197g 

Roger Taunton-Rigby I97g 

Denise Bienfang, Chairman 1973 



36 



TOWN CLERK 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. Her duties in- 
clude recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections and 
notifying the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropria- 
tions which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept at the Town 
Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town 
should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

March 26, 1977 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 9:30 a.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and the Moderator called attention 
to Article 1 of the Warrant (Election of Officers), which will be 
acted upon on March 28th. A quorum being present, the following 
business was transacted: 

The Moderator brought before the Meeting consideration of 
Articles 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 15, 17, 25, 27 and 30 which appeared on the 
Consent Calendar which had been sent to the townspeople seven days 
before Town Meeting. Articles 2, 4, 25 and 27 were held out from 
the Consent Calendar and the remainder of the articles were passed 
unanimously by the Town. 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, commis- 
sioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be elected 
by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED: That John B. Garrison be elected Measurer of Wood 
and Bark for the ensuing year. 

ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 



37 



VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 
Commissioners, and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 
accepted. 



ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 
elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any Depart- 
ment, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for addi- 
tional compensation any of its members and to fix additional com- 
pensation of such members. 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected officials of the 
Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1977, and ending June 30, 
1978, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Selectmen $ 3.00 

Town Clerk 100.00 

Treasurer $ Collector 700.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its 
members to work on Town mapping and additional assessing duties at 
a salary not to exceed $4,450 for the said fiscal period. 



ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town adopt as separate appropriations the 
listed recommendations in Exhibit 7, attached to the report of the 
Finance Committee, printed on pages 14 through 22, inclusive, of 
the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1977 Town Meeting, except 
that the following numbered accounts will be increased as follows: 

#100 Police Department Salaries - will increase by 
$4,400 to $174,000; 

#110 Fire Department Salaries - will increase by $4,400 
to $130,900; 

#201 Board of Health - Expense - will increase by $300 
to $6,250; 

#530 Library - Custodian - will increase by $4 to $6,600; 



38 



the following numbered accounts will be decreased as follows: 

#2 Selectmen - Salaries - will decrease by $297 to $3; 

#5 Selectmen - Out of State Travel - will decrease by $50 
to $200; 

#13 Financial Offices - Salaries - will decrease by $1,500 
to $38,500; 

#14 Financial Offices - Expense - will decrease by $2,325 
to $14,705; 

#16 Town Offices - Expense - will decrease by $1,000 to 
$9,250; 

#17 Town Offices - Postage Meter - will decrease by $200 
to $3,800; 

#51 Board of Assessors - Expense - will decrease by $250 
to $2,530; 

#60 Town Clerk - Salary - will decrease by $100 to $100; 

#80 Planning Board - Expense - will decrease by $300 to 
$9,830; 

#82 Conservation Commission - Land Management - will 
decrease by $500 to $36,027; 

#83 Conservation Commission - Planning $ Administration - 
will decrease by $1,000 to $14,500; 

#101 Police Department - Expense - will decrease by $300 
to $19,400; 

#112 Fire Department - Expense - will decrease by $1,000 
to $24,040; 

#200 Board of Health - Salaries - will decrease by $1,091 
to $17,160; 

#502 Elementary Schools - Instruction - will decrease by 
$21,500 to $1,356,071; 

#504 Elementary Schools - Operation d, Maintenance - will 
decrease by $7,600 to $297,800; 



39 



#510 Regional High School - will decrease by $26,700 to 
$639,058.10; 

#520 Library - Salaries - will decrease by $956 to 
$82,470; 

#521 Library - Books - will decrease by $2,339 to 
$25,600; 

#522 Library - Expense - will decrease by $300 to $6,740; 

#531 Library - Maintenance $ Expense - will decrease by 
$496 to $11,550; 

#600 Recreation Committee - Salaries $ Custodial - will 
decrease by $400 to $20,150; 

#602 Recreation Committee - Expense - will decrease by 
$400 to $7,825; 

#603 Youth Director - expense - will decrease by $300 to 
$3,700; 

#702 Cemeteries - Maintenance § Expense - will decrease 
by $250 to $6,750; 

and that all items be raised by taxation except to the following 
extent : 

#13 Financial Offices - Salaries - $4,000 be taken from 
Water Department receipts when received; 

#100 Police Department - Salaries - $72,500 to be taken 
from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds, and $20,000 to 
be taken from the Agency Account established for 
payments in lieu of taxes; 

#112 Fire Department - Salaries - $7,392 to be taken from 
Anti-Recession Fiscal Assistance funds received from 
the Federal Government; 

#502 Elementary Schools - Instruction - $57,500 to be 
taken from Metco funds; 

#504 Elementary Schools - Operation £ Maintenance - 
$1,286.49 to be taken from the Julian DeCordova 



40 



School Equipment Fund and $65.47 to be taken from the 
Grammar School fund; 

#520 Library - Salaries - $1,526.32 to be taken from Dog 
Tax Receipts; 

#521 Library - Books - $2,837.63 to be taken from State Aid 
to Libraries; 

#805 School Building Bonds - $120,000 to be taken from free 
cash; 

#815 Swimming Pool Bonds - $10,000 to be taken from the 
Agency Account established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

#816 Interest on Swimming Pool Bonds - $3,680 to be taken 
from the Agency Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees; 

#819 Codman Kitchen Bonds - $2,500 to be taken from the 
Agency Account established for funds to be received 
from the Codman Trustees; 

#820 Interest on Codman Kitchen Bonds - $1,293.75 to be 
taken from the Agency Account established for funds 
to be received from the Codman Trustees; 

#901 Employee Insurance § Hospital Fund - $110,000 to be 
taken from free cash. 

The total for General Purposes for the fiscal period from 
July 1, 1977, through June 30, 1978, is shown in Exchibit 7 as 
$4,510,897.97, and with amendments is now $4,448,847.97. After 
application of special funds as listed above, the amount to be 
raised is $4,034,266.31. 

Items #950 to #956, inclusive, totalling $159,850, as listed 
on page 22, shall be taken from Water Department receipts. 



The following resolve was made by James DeNormandie after being 
recognized by the Moderator and voted unanimously by the Town: 
RESOLVED : That the citizens of Lincoln in Town Meeting assembled 
express their appreciation to Marion Fitch for her generosity in pre- 
senting to the Town an oil painting of Hartwell Farm by Samuel E. 



41 



Evans. We wish to acknowledge not only the historic importance of 
Hartwell Farm in Lincoln's history but also the happy contribution 
which Miss Fitch and Miss Poor made to our community for almost 
fifty years. 

At this time, Mrs. John Wofford of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
High School Committee paid tribute to Henry Morgan who retires this 
year from the Committee after fourteen years of service. A stand- 
ing vote of thanks was given Mr. Morgan. 



At 11:30 a.m. the Annual Town Meeting was temporarily adjourned 
in order that a Special Town Meeting, which had been called for this 
time and place, might be held. 






SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
March 26, 1977 



ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be added to the 
amount appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, for line item #100 (Police Depart- 
ment - Salaries), or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town vote to increase the amount appropriated 
under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for 
line item #100 (POLICE DEPARTMENT - SALARIES) by $9,500, of which 
$8,100 will be taken from free cash and $1,400 transferred from the 
amount appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1976 
Annual Town Meeting for line item #110 (FIRE DEPARTMENT - SALARIES). 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be added to the 
amount appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, for line item #300 (Public Works 
Department - Salaries), or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be added to the 
amount appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, for line item #304 (Public Works 



42 



Department - Snow $ Ice Removal) , or take any other action relative 

thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town increase the amount appropriated under 

Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for line 

item #304 (PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT - SNOW AND ICE REMOVAL) by 

$14,000, said sum to be taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be added to the 
amount appropriated under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, for line item #902 (Property § Indem- 
nity Insurance), or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town increase the amount appropriated under 
Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1976 Annual Town Meeting for line 
item #902 (PROPERTY § INDEMNITY INSURANCE) by $17,500, said sum to 
be taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
settle controversies, upon such terms and conditions as they deter- 
mine, between the Town and the Communications Workers of America, 
AFL/CIO, before the State Labor Relations Commission and in the 
Middlesex Superior Court, and a controversy between Joseph Fratto 
and Lincoln Police Officer Steven Ziegler, also in the Middlesex 
Superior Court, all arising in connection with the non-reappointment 
of Joseph Fratto as a police officer, and will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum of money to effect 
such settlements, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Selectmen are authorized to settle, upon 
such terms and conditions as they shall determine, controversies 
between the Town and the Communications Workers of American, AFL/CIO, 
before the State Labor Relations Commission and in the Middlesex 
Superior Court, and a controversy between Joseph Fratto and Lincoln 
Police Officer Steven Ziegler, also in the Middlesex Superior Court, 
all arising by reason of the non-reappointment by the Town of 
Joseph Fratto as a police officer, and to appropriate the sum of 
$6,000 from free cash to effect such settlements. 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm 
the action of the Selectmen in signing a contract with the Metro- 
politan District Commission by the terms of which septage from the 
Town may be deposited in MDC mains, and to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to pay the assess- 
ment levied on the Town for such service, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 



43 



VOTED : That the Town ratify and confirm the action of the 
Selectmen in signing a contract with the Metropolitan District 
Commission by the terms of which septage from the Town may be de- 
posited in MDC mains, and to appropriate the sum of $2,375 to pay 
the assessment levied on the Town for such service, said sum to be 
taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be added to the 
amount appropriated under Article 25 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, for the repair of various portions 
of the exterior of the Lincoln Library (including the roof) , or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town increase the amount appropriated under 
Article 25 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 27, 
1976, for the repair of various portions of the exterior of the 
Lincoln Library (including the roof) by $17,170, said sum to be 
taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to cover the cost 
of installation of lights in the commuter parking lot adjoining the 
Mall at Lincoln Station in South Lincoln, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED: To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, 
or transfer from available funds, a sum of money for the construc- 
tion of new westbound and eastbound B § M commuter platforms on 
property presently owned by the Town in South Lincoln, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (Motion lost; voice vote) MOVED: That the Town vote 
to appropriate the sum of $3,000 for the construction of new west- 
bound B § M commuter platforms on property presently owned by the 
Town in South Lincoln, said sum to be taken from free cash. 



At 2:15 p.m., there being no further business to be transacted, 
the Special Town Meeting was adjourned. 

At this point the Annual Town Meeting was reconvened by Mr. 
Bergen and the following business was transacted. 



44 



RECONVENED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1977, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 
VOTED : That the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to 
time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1977, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Select- 
men and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract 
with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the elementary 
school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorizes the Board of Selectmen and 
the School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with the 
U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the elementary school at 
L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the School 
Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of child- 
ren from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town supports the School Committee in its 
continuing plan to bring a limited number of children from Boston 
to the Lincoln schools for purposes of education, provided that the 
request for tuition reimbursement be raised to at least $900 per 
pupil. 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to acquire land for open space and conservation pur- 
poses, including outdoor recreation, under General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8C, as amended, and to see if such sum shall be raised by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any 



45 



combination thereof, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 

ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conserva- | 
tion purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a par- ' 
eel of land owned by Phillips-Andover Academy, hereinafter described, 
containing approximately 4.5 acres, and for that purpose to raise andlj 
appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of those methods, and to ap 
ply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth, or either of them, for grants 
for such acquisition, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Description 

A certain parcel of land lying between Lincoln Road and Sandy 
Pond Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Sumner Smith land in 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, for Conservation Commission", dated December 
22, 1967, revised February 11, 1977, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike. 
VOTED : (305, yes; 49, no) That the Selectmen are authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee by eminent domain, 
purchase, or any other way, for conservation purposes, including out- 
door recreation, from Phillips Academy, a parcel of land containing 
4.16 acres, more or less, lying between Lincoln Road and Sandy Pond 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Sumner Smith Land in Lin- 
coln, Massachusetts, for Conservation Commission", dated December 22, 
1967, revised February 11, 1977, by Cleverdon, Varney £, Pike, a suit- 
able version of which is to be recorded; that the sum of $104,400 is 
hereby raised and appropriated for this purpose; that to meet this 
appropriation the sum of $4,400 is to be taken from the conservation 
receipts reserve account; that the Treasurer with the approval of 
the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $100,000 under Section 7 (3) 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws; and that the Selectmen are author- 1 
ized to execute in the name and on behalf of the Town such documents 
and agreements as may be necessary or desirable to carry out the 
provisions of this vote. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conserva- 
tion purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a par- 
cel of land owned by the Estate of Henrietta S. Warner, hereinafter 
described, containing approximately 49.9 acres, and for that purpose 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of those 
methods, and to apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either 
of them for grants for such acquisition, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Description 

A certain parcel of land lying between Mackintosh Lane and 
Baker Bridge Road, as shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of Land in 



46 



Lincoln, Mass. for Estate of Henrietta S. Warner", dated September 
28, 1973, by Albert A. Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Civil Engi- 
neers and Surveyors. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conserva- 
tion purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a 
parcel of land owned by Greta W. Snider, hereinafter described, con- 
taining approximately 15 acres, and for that purpose to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of those methods, and to 
apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either of them for 
grants for such acquisition, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Description 

A certain parcel of land on the corner of Lincoln Road and 
Mackintosh Lane, as shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of Estate of 
George C. Hodges, Lincoln, Mass.", dated December, 1928, Pierce £ 
Barnes Co., Civil Engineers. 
VOTED: To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to enable the Planning Board to undertake a study of 
the various open parcels of land in the Town, with a view to deter- 
mining which of said parcels should be preserved as open space from 
the point of view of the particular neighborhood in which the par- 
cel is located, to authorize the Board to employ any of its members 
for that project and to fix the compensation of such member, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate $11,750 to en- 
able the Planning Board to undertake a study of the various open 
parcels of land in the Town for the purpose of determining which of 
said parcels should be preserved as open space from the point of 
view of the particular neighborhood in which the parcel is located; 
that to meet said appropriation the sum of $2,191.80 is appropriated 
from the special account established under Article 15 of the War- 
rant for the Annual Town Meeting held March 16, 1970, and the sum 
of $9,558.20 is raised and appropriated by taxation and that the 
Planning Board is hereby authorized to employ any one or more of 
its members to work on the project, the compensation of such mem- 
ber or members not to exceed $5,600 in the aggregate, which compen- 
sation shall be taken from the amount authorized for the project 
hereunder. 



47 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to be used by the Water Commissioners and the Conser- 
vation Commission for the purpose of retaining consultants and mak- 
ing other expenditures to assess possible future pollution of the 
surface and subsurface drainage basins serving the Tower Road Well, 
and whether such sums shall be raised by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds, by use of water department receipts or surplus, by 
grants from private, state or federal sources, or any combination 
thereof, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000 for the purpose of retaining consultants and making other 
expenditures to assess possible future pollution of the water supply 
sources of the Town and that to meet said appropriation the sum of 
$2,500 be raised and appropriated from taxation and $2,500 be appro- 
priated from Water Department income and that the Conservation Com- 
mission, the Water Commissioners and other appropriate officers of 
the Town are hereby authorized to apply for any available state and 
federal aid for this project and that any such aid received shall 
be applied and is hereby appropriated towards the expense of the 
project. 



ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts of 
money and income received from use of conservation properties for 
the maintenance and improvement of conservation properties, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Conservation Commission be and hereby is 
authorized for the fiscal year 1977-1978 to expend sums received 
from the use of conservation properties for the maintenance and 
improvement of such conservation properties. 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by adding to Article XI entitled 
Miscellaneous the following new Section 13 substantially as follows: 

"13. DOG REGULATIONS. 

(a) No person shall keep in the Town any dog, which, by 
biting, by howling or excessive barking, or in any other 
manner, endangers the safety of any person or disturbs 
the peace or quiet of any neighborhood. 

(b) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be in 
any municipal building unless the dog is kept on a leash. 



48 



(c) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be in 
a school building or on school grounds between thirty 
minutes before and thirty minutes after the hours when 
any school or recreation program is in session, unless the 
cognizant authority otherwise specifically permits. 

(d) The dog officer shall order the restraint and/or muzzling, 
for a period not to exceed thirty days, of any dog, which 
he finds, after a complaint from an identified person or 
through his own observation, has: 

(1) Bitten or threatened the safety of any person; 

(2) Killed or maimed any domesticated or farm animal; 

(3) Chased any motor, recreational, or pedal vehicle, 

or any animal carrying or drawing a person, upon any 
public or traveled way; 

(4) Damaged property; 

(5) Committed any act which places its owner or keeper 
in violation of a prior subsection of this bylaw. 

The second time the dog officer issues a restraining or 
muzzling order regarding the same dog on account of a 
repeated offense under this subsection, the dog officer 
shall notify the Selectmen in writing so that they may 
take any further action. 

The owner or keeper of any dog that has been ordered to 
be restrained or muzzled under the provisions of this 
subsection may request the Selectmen in writing to vacate 
such order. 

(e) The owner or keeper of a dog who fails to comply with this 
bylaw, or with any order of the dog officer issued pursu- 
ant to the provisions of this bylaw, shall be subject to 
the following penalties: 

First offense: Warning 

Second and subsequent offenses of the same substance: 

Fine of not more than ten dollars 
in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 140, Sec- 
tion 173, as amended. 

In addition, for each offense, the owner or keeper of the 
dog shall be subject to the following charges: 

Reimbursement to the dog officer of his expenses for 
maintaining the dog, if the dog officer finds it 



49 



necessary to impound the dog until its owner or 
keeper can be found. 

Before release of an unlicensed dog is made by the 
dog officer, he shall require that a license be 
secured. A late fee of one dollar shall be paid to 
the Town, in addition to the regular license fee, in 
such instance."; 

and to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the salary of a dog 
officer, whose duty it will be to enfore the foregoing regulations, 
in addition to carrying out the other duties prescribed by law, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: (Regulations: 224, yes; 53, no. Salary; unanimous) 
That the General Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln are hereby amended 
by adding to Article XI entitled Miscellaneous the following new 
Section 13, said new Section 13 to read as follows: 

"13. DOG REGULATIONS 

(a) No person shall keep in the Town any dog which, by biting, 
by howling or excessive barking, or in any other manner, 
endangers the safety of any person or disturbs the peace 
or quite of any neighborhood. 

(b) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be in 
any municipal building unless the dog is kept on a leash. 

(c) No person shall allow a dog owned or kept by him to be in 
a school building or on school grounds between thirty min- 
utes before and thirty minutes after the hours when any 
school or recreation program is in session, unless the 
cognizant authority otherwise specifically permits. 

(d) The dog officer shall order the restraint and/or muzzling, 
for a period not to exceed thirty days, of any dog, which 
the officer finds, after a complaint from an identified 
person or through the dog officer's own observation, has: 

(1) Bitten or threatened the safety of any person; 

(2) Killed or maimed any domesticated or farm animal; 

(3) Chased any motor, recreational or pedal vehicle, or 
any animal carrying or drawing a person upon any 
public or traveled way; 

(4) Damaged property; 

(5) Committed any act which places its owner or keeper 
in violation of a prior subsection of this bylaw. 






50 



The second time the dog officer issues a restraining or 
muzzling order regarding the same dog on account of a 
repeated offense under this subsection, the dog officer 
shall notify the Selectmen in writing so that they may 
take further action. 

The owner or keeper of any dog that has been ordered to 
be restrained or muzzled under the provisions of this 
subsection may request the Selectmen in writing to vacate 
such order. 

(e) The owner or keeper of a dog who fails to comply with 
this bylaw, or with any order of the dog officer issued 
pursuant to the provisions of this bylaw, shall be subject 
to the following penalties: 

» First offense: Warning 
Second and subsequent offenses of the same substance: 
Fine of not more than ten dollars 
in accordance with Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 140, Section - 
173, as amended. 

In addition, for each offense, the owner or keeper of the 
dog shall be subject to the following charges: 

Reimbursement to the dog officer of the dog officer's 
expenses for maintaining the dog, if the dog officer 
finds it necessary to impound the dog until its 
owner or keeper can be found. 

Before release of an unlicensed dog is made by the dog 
officer, the dog officer shall require that a license be 
secured. A late fee of one dollar shall be paid to the 
Town, in addition to the regular license fee, in such 
instance."; 

and that the sum of $7,000 be raised and appropriated for the sal- 
ary of a dog officer, whose duty it will be to enforce the fore- 
going regulations, in addition to carrying out the other duties 
prescribed by law. 



After a motion was made and unanimously voted to adjourn, the 
meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. until Tuesday, March 29, 1977. 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



51 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 28, 1977 



In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting, the polls were declared open at 7:30 a.m. by Mr. 
William G. Langton from the Board of Registrars along with Mrs. 
Snelling, Town Clerk, Mr. Harold A. Levey, Jr., Mr. Robert M. 
Gargill, Mr. John B. Garrison, Mrs. William Elliott and Mr. Howard 
Snelling, acting as wardens throughout the day. The polls were 
declared closed at 8 p.m. by Mr. William G. Langton. There was 
a total vote of 1,264, with the following results (total number of 
registered voters in the Town at this election - 3,233): 



Town Clerk (for one year) 



Elizabeth J. Snelling 
Blanks 



1142 
122 



Selectman (for three years) Peter B. Adams 

Ann F. Sutherland 
Andrew D. Frazier, Jr. 
Blanks 



414 
626 
142 

82 



Town Treasurer (for one 
year) 

Assessor (for three years) 



Richard Wengren 
Blanks 

J. Thomas Franklin 
Evan J. Semerjian 
Blanks 



1046 
218 

370 
789 
105 



Collector of Taxes (for 
three years) 



Richard Wengren 
Blanks 



1050 
214 



School Committee (for three 
years) (2) 



Roger G. Barzun 
Abraham I . Mlavsky 
James W. Spindler 
Blanks 



771 
508 
620 
629 



Water Commissioner (for 
three years) 



John R. H. Kimball 
Blanks 



1030 
234 



Board of Health (for 
three years) 



Herbert A. Haessler, M.D. 1040 
Blanks 224 



52 



Board of Health (for one 

year) William B. Stason, M.D. 1047 

Blanks 217 



Cemetery Commissioner (for 

three years) James DeNormandie 

Blanks 



992 

272 



Planning Board (for five 

years) Robert C. Brannen 

Blanks 



1010 

254 



Commissioner of Trust Funds 

(for three years). Virginia M. Niles 

Blanks 



1020 

244 



Trustee of Bemis Fund (for 

three years) Rebecca B. Chase 

Blanks 



985 
279 



Trustee of Lincoln Library 

(for three years) Katherine S. Bolt 

Blanks 



1069 
195 



Director, DeCordova § Dana 
Museum § Park (for 
four years) 



John H. Carter 
Gerard L. Kirby 
Richard S. Lee 
Blanks 



327 
544 
23J. 
162 



Recreation Committee 

(for three years) 



Marc P. Onigman 230 

Frederick C. Richardson 669 
Blanks 365 



Tree Warden (for one year) Russell L. Barnes 

Blanks 



1037 
227 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 

District School Committee 

(for three years) (2) Richard H. Davison 

Richard F. Brooks 
Cyrus H. Kano 
Allan C. Morgan 
Blanks 



651 

204 

1070 

165 

438 



53 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 

District School Committee 

(for one year) (1) Dante Germanotta 633 

Bernard J. Hennessy 211 

Blanks 420 



QUESTION: Shall licenses be granted in the 
Town of Lincoln for the sale 
therein of wine and malt beverages 
not to be drunk on the premises? 



Yes 


533 


No 


639 


.nks 


92 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



54 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
March 29, 1977 



On Tuesday, March 29, 1977, the adjourned session of the 
March 26, 1977 Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Mod- 
erator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 7:35 p.m., and a quorum being 
present, the following business was transacted. 



ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums 
received by the School Committee as rental charges for space in the 
Center School for the upkeep of school property, said sums to be 
placed in an Agency Account and expended under the direction of the 
School Committee as the occasion arises, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the School Committee be and hereby is author- 
ized to place sums received as rental charges for space in the 
Center School in an Agency Account, and to expend sums from such 
Account for the upkeep of school property as the occasion arises, 
during the fiscal year 1977-1978. 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to reclaim the DiPerna 
land, so-called, on the northerly side of the Cambridge Turnpike, 
acquired by the Town in 1965 for park, recreational and conservation 
purposes, by the temporary use of said land as a landfill for refuse 
in conjunction with the Town's off site transfer station, and to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money (1) to develop a detailed engi- 
neering site use plan meeting the requirements of the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering; (2) to develop the 
site in accordance with said plan; and (3) to seek a declaratory 
judgment from a court of competent jurisdiction as to the propriety 
of such use, if, in the opinion of the Selectmen, that action is 
advisable, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of a Class 1 Ambulance, and for nec- 
essary expenses to be incurred in relation to the operation of said 
ambulance, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : (Motion lost; standing vote) MOVED: That the Town 

raise and appropriate the sum of $38,000 to purchase and operate a 
Class 1 Ambulance, in accordance with the provisions of Massachu- 



55 



setts General Laws, Chapter 111C. 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI, E, 
of the zoning bylaw (SIGNS), as proposed in an amendment now on file 
with the Town Clerk and available for inspection, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to be used for site preparation work for future bi- 
cycle paths through lands owned by the Town, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to acquire by purchase, gift or in any other way, the 
following described parcels of land owned by Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint for the Town Cemetery on Lexington Road, and whether to pro- 
vide said sum by appropriation of funds which have accumulated from 
the sale of cemetery lots, sometimes known as the Cemetery Invest- 
ment Fund, by taxation, by borrowing, by transfer of other available 
funds, or by any combination of those methods, such sum to be added 
to the sum C$15,000) appropriated under Article 22 of the Warrant 
for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 22, 1971, which was appro- 
priated from the Cemetery Investment Fund to acquire the first of 
said parcels, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Descriptions 

Parcel No. 1 . A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 
and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, for Town of Lincoln", dated 
January 8, 1968, as revised 1971, by Cleverdon, Varney $ Pike. 

Parcel No. 2 A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 
and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. 
Owned by Edward F. $ Henry R. Flint. Preliminary Study Plan for 
Cemetery Commission, Town of Lincoln", dated February 11, 1977, by 
Cleverdon, Varney $ Pike. 

VOTED : (Motion lost: 117, yes; 72, no) MOVED: That the 
Selectmen are authorized in the name and on behalf of the Town to 



56 



acquire in fee by eminent domain, purchase or any other way the 
following described parcels of land owned by Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint for the Town Cemetery on Lexington Road and for such purpose 
the sum of $120,000 is raised and appropriated to be added to the 
balance of $14,000 previously appropriated for the purpose of ac- 
quiring Parcel #1, as hereinafter described, under Article 22 of the 
Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 22, 1971, and that 
to meet said appropriation the sum of $18,750 is appropriated from 
the Cemetery Investment Fund, so-called, and the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $101,250 under 
Section 7 (8) of Chapter 44 of the General Laws by issuing three 
notes of the Town therefor each in the face amount of $33,750 becom- 
ing due and payable at the Harvard Trust Company respectively each 
year for three successive years beginning in 1978 on the anniversary 
date of the acquisition of said parcels, bearing interest at the 
rate of 5% per annum and payable to said Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint. 

Descriptions 

Parcel No. 1 . A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 
and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, for Town of Lincoln", dated 
January 8, 1968, as revised 1971, by Cleverdon, Varney § Pike. 

Parcel No. 2 . A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 
and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. 
Owned by Edward F. § Henry R. Flint. Preliminary Study Plan for 
Cemetery Commission, Town of Lincoln", dated February 11, 1977, by 
Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike. 



ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $6,000, or any other sum, to be added to the funds appro- 
priated for the construction of an addition to the pumping station 
at Sandy Pond under Article 15 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting held on March 27, 1976, and to amend the authority granted 
to the Water Commissioners under that Article to allow them either 
to build such an addition or to modernize and renovate the existing 
pumping station, or to take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the authority granted the Water Commissioners 
by Article 15 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held 
March 27, 1976, to construct an addition to the pumping station at 
Sandy Pond is hereby amended to authorize the Commissioners to make 
improvements to the pumping station at Sandy Pond for the purpose 



57 



of providing space for improved chemical mixing facilities and more 
efficient material storage and that the sum of $16,000.00 is hereby 
appropriated from Water Department income or surplus to be added to 
the sum of $14,000.00 already appropriated under said Article 15. 



ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
$150,000, or any other sum, by borrowing under the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (5), as amended, said sum to be 
used by the Water Commissioners for the construction of a 10" main 
on Concord Road and Old Concord Road, and to authorize the Water 
Commissioners to apply for and accept any grants which may become 
available from State or Federal sources for any or all of such con- 
struction, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Water Commissioners are hereby authorized to 
install ten inch water mains in Concord Road and Old Concord Road, 
together with appropriate hydrants and fittings, such mains to re- 
place existing obsolete and inadequate six inch mains, and that the 
sum of $150,000 is hereby appropriated therefor, and to meet said 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $150,000 under the provi- 
sions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (5) and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor, payable in accordance with said Chap- 
ter 44, so that the whole loan shall be paid in not more than fif- 
teen years from the date of issue of the first bond or note, and 
that the appropriate officers of the Town are hereby authorized to 
apply for any available state and federal aid for this project, and 
that any such aid received shall be applied and is hereby appropri- 
ated toward the expenses of the project. 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to carry out a program of tree and shrub care, in- 
cluding planting along the roadsides and on public lands, pruning, 
spraying and removal of diseased trees, under the supervision of 
the Town Tree Warden, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the sum of $8,500 be raised and appropriated 
to carry out a program of tree and shrub care, including planting 
along the roadsides and on public lands, pruning, spraying, and 
removal of diseased trees, said program to be under the supervision 
of the Tree Warden. 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will, as its final bicentennial 
project, vote to transfer $1,000.00 remaining in the Bicentennial 
Fund and representing the proceeds of the sale of tickets and other 
items, to a new special fund to be called the Tricentennial Trust 



58 



Fund, to be held, invested and reinvested and the income accumulated 
and added to the Fund under the supervision and direction of the 
Commissioners of Trust Funds, and to be used by the Town for an 
appropriate celebration of our nation's tricentennial in the years 
2075 and 2076, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town will, as its final bicentennial pro- 
ject, vote to transfer $1,000.00 remaining in the Bicentennial Fund 
and representing the proceeds of the sale of tickets and other items, 
to a new special fund to be called the Tricentennial Trust Fund, to 
be held, invested and reinvested and the income accumulated and 
added to the Fund under the supervision and direction of the Com- 
missioners of Trust Funds, and to be used by the Town for an appro- 
priate celebration of our nation's tricentennial in the years 2075 
and 2076. 



ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the 
United States of America (USAF) all of its rights, title and inter- 
est in a section of Old Bedford Road, beginning at the Lincoln/Bed- 
ford line and running in a southwesterly direction to the property 
line of the United States of America (USAF) and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts (Massport) for a distance of approximately 1650 feet, 
as shown on a plan of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by the De- 
partment of Public Works given as plan 784-Q, Page 54-61 "Lincoln - 
Old Bedford Road - Scale 1 inch = 40 feet", and on a plan of the 
Department of the Air Force given as "Basic Layout Plan - Hanscom 
Field", dated January 1, 1960, with addenda, which road in the opin- 
ion of the Selectmen is no longer required for public purposes, for 
the sum of $1.00 and other valuable considerations, and to authorize 
the Selectmen to execute, acknowledge and deliver in the name and on 
behalf of the Town, such deeds and other documents as they may deem 
necessary or desirable to carry out the provisions of this article, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are hereby authorized in the name 
and on behalf of the Town to convey for the sum of $1.00 all the 
Town's right, title and interest in a section of Old Bedford Road, 
beginning at the Lincoln/Bedford line and running in a southwester- 
ly direction to the property line of the United States of America 
(USAF) and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (MassPort) for a dis- 
tance of approximately 1650 feet, as shown on a plan of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts by the Department of Public Works given as 
Plan 784-Q, Page 54-61 "Lincoln - Old Bedford Road - Scale 1 inch = 
40 feet", and on a plan of the Department of the Air Force given as 
"Basic Layout Plan - Hanscom Field", dated January 1, 1960, with 
addenda, which road in the opinion of the Selectmen is no longer 
required for public purposes, to the United States of America 
(USAF). In order to carry out the provisions of this vote, the 



59 



Selectmen are hereby authorized to execute, acknowledge and deliver 
in the name and on behalf of the Town such deeds and other documents 
as they may deem necessary or expedient. 



ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the use of the Pub- 
lic Works Department, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000 for the purchase of equipment for the use of the Public Works 
Department . 



ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to make necessary repairs to fire engine #4 (1964 
International Harvester forest fire truck) , or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500 
to make necessary repairs to fire engine #4 (1964 International Har- 
vester forest fire truck) . 



ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
or transfer from available funds in the Treasury the sum of $24,000, 
or any other sum, for the construction, reconstruction and/or main- 
tenance and repair of roads and bridges, and the enforcement of traf- 
fic laws, as requested by the Board of Selectmen, to be reimbursed 
by the Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$24,000 for the construction, reconstruction and/or maintenance and 
repair of roads and bridges, and the enforcement of traffic laws, 
as requested by the Board of Selectmen, said sum to be taken from 
free cash and returned thereto when reimbursement is received from 
the Commonwealth under Chapter 283, Acts of 1976. 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Select- 
men to sign a contract with the Metropolitan District Commission by 
the terms of which septage from the Town may be deposited in MDC 
mains, and to raise and appropriate a sum of money to pay the assess- 
ment levied on the Town for such service, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are authorized to sign a contract 
with the Metropolitan District Commission by the terms of which 
septage from the Town may be deposited in MDC mains, and that the 



60 



sum of $6,250 is raised and appropriated to pay the assessment 
levied on the Town for such service. 



At 10:20 p.m., there being no further business to come before 
the meeting, it was voted to adjourn. 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



61 



SPECIAL PRIMARY 
May 24, 1977 



The polls were opened by Town Clerk, Elizabeth J. Snelling, at 
10:00 a.m. who was aided throughout the day by Wardens, William G. 
Langton, Peggy P. Elliott and Harold E. Lawson. The polls were 
declared closed by Mrs. Snelling at 8:00 p.m. The total number 
of votes cast was 461 (total number of registered voters for this 
election - 3,166). The following results were recorded: 



DEMOCRATIC 



Senator in General Court 
5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



Carol C. Amick 
Joseph T. Maguire 
Virginia E. Mooney 
Blanks 



367 
31 

1 
3 



REPUBLICAN 



Senator in General Court 
5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



Michael A. Caira 
Marvin C. Gilkie 
Russell W. Miller 
Blanks 



35 
8 
5 

11 



AMERICAN 



Senator in General Court 
5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



Parker Weaver 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



62 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 15, 1977 



Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 7:35 p.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and a quorum being present, the 
following business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 
way the private road known as Storey Drive from Page Road to and 
including the turnaround, as shown on a plan entitled "A Subdivi- 
sion in Lincoln, Mass." - Owner/Developer - Everett A. § Anne Black, 
dated January 8, 1975, Revised May 16, 1975, by Schofield Bros., 
Inc., Professional Engineers and Registered Land Surveyors, approved 
by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln on April 30, 1975, and 
recorded in the South Middlesex District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
#714 of 1975 and Plan #1211 of 1975, and that for this purpose will 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, pur- 
chase, or otherwise, the land contained therein, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a public way the private road 
known as Storey Drive from Page Road to and including the turnaround, 
as shown on a plan entitled "A Subdivision in Lincoln, Mass." - 
Owner/Developer Everett A. § Anne Black, dated January 8, 1975, Re- 
vised May 16, 1975, by Schofield Bros., Inc., Professional Engineers 
and Registered Land Surveyors, approved by the Planning Board of the 
Town of Lincoln on April 30, 1975, and recorded in the South Middle- 
sex District Registry of Deeds as Plan #714 of 1975 and Plan #1211 
of 1975, and that for this purpose the Town authorizes the Select- 
men to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, or otherwise, the land 
contained therein, and to accept a confirmatory deed thereto. 



ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to acquire land for open space and conservation pur- 
poses, including outdoor recreation, under General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8C, as amended, and to see if such sum shall be raised by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any 
combination thereof, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the following resolution be adopted: 

RESOLVED that the Plan presented by the Conservation 
Commission at hearings on June 8 and 9, 1977 



63 



mailed to all voters and presented at this 
meeting is hereby endorsed. 

The Town Meeting approved Mr. William N. Swift replacing Mr. 
Bergen as Moderator during discussion and action on Article 3. 



ARTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conserva- 
tion purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a par- 
cel of land owned by the Estate of Henrietta S. Warner, hereinafter 
described, containing approximately 49.9 acres, and for that purpose 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from- 
available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of those methods, 
and to apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either of them for 
grants for such acquisition, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Description 

A certain parcel of land lying between Mackintosh Lane and 
Baker Bridge Road, as shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of Land in 
Lincoln, Mass. for Estate of Henrietta S. Warner", dated September 
28, 1973, by Albert A. Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, Civil Engi- 
neers and Surveyors. 

VOTED : (175, yes; 28, no) That the Selectmen are authorized 
in the name and on behalf of the Town to acquire in fee by eminent 
domain, purchase, or any other way, for conservation purposes, in- 
cluding outdoor recreation, from the Estate of Henrietta S. Warner, 
a parcel of land containing 49.9 acres, more or less, lying between 
Mackintosh Lane and Baker Bridge Road, as shown on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. for Estate of Henrietta S. Warner", 
dated September 28, 1973, by Albert A. Miller and Wilbur C. Nylander, 
Civil Engineers and Surveyors, to be recorded; that the sum of 
$210,000 is hereby raised and appropriated for this purpose; that to 
meet this appropriation the sum of $10,000 is to be taken from monies 
to be given to the Town for this purpose; that the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $200,000 under Sec- 
tion 7 (3) of Chapter 44 of the General Laws; that the Selectmen are 
authorized to apply for state and federal aid; that any reimburse- 
ment under Section 11 of Chapter 132A of the General Laws shall be 
applied as provided therein and is hereby appropriated for that pur- 
pose; and that the Selectmen are authorized to execute in the name 
and on behalf of the Town such documents and agreements as may be 
necessary or desirable to carry out the provisions of this vote. 



ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for conserva- 
tion purposes, by purchase, eminent domain, or any other way, a par- 
cel of land owned by Greta W. Snider, hereinafter described, 



64 



containing approximately 15 acres, and for that purpose to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money by taxation, by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of those methods, and to 
apply to the U. S. and the Commonwealth or either of them for grants 
for such acquisition, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Description 

A certain parcel of land on the corner of Lincoln Road and 
Mackintosh Lane, as shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of Estate of 
George C. Hodges, Lincoln, Mass.", dated December, 1928, Pierce § 
Barnes Co., Civil Engineers. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to enable the Conservation Commission to establish an 
organization which will assist in the implementation of the Town's 
Open Space Plan, which will study the effects of the Plan, and which 
will develop operating policies regarding land of conservation in- 
terest, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $12,655 to en- 
able the Conservation Commission to establish an organization to 
assist in the implementation of the Town's Open Space Plan, to study 
the effects of the Plan, and to develop operating policies regard- 
ing land of conservation interest, said sum to be taken from the 
conservation receipts reserve account. 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropri- 
ate a sum of money for the use of the committee appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen to plan a Town-wide meeting on land use alterna- 
tives to be held in the fall of 1977, or take any other action rel- 
ative thereto. 

V OTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,000 to be 
used by the committee appointed by the Selectmen for the purpose 
of planning a Town-wide meeting on land use alternatives, to be 
held in the fall of 1977, for necessary expenses incurred in plan- 
ning said meeting, said sum to be taken from free cash. 



After a motion was made to adjourn and unanimously voted, the 
meeting was adjourned at 11:05 p.m. until Thursday, June 16, 1977, 
at 7 :30 p.m. 



65 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 16, 1977 



On Thursday, June 16, 1977, the adjourned session of the June 
15, 1977, Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 p.m. by 
the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, and a quorum being present 
the following business was transacted. 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for necessary repairs to the generator at the Town 
Hall, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,000 for 
necessary repairs to the Town Hall generator, said sum to be taken 
from free cash. 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to cover the cost of necessary exterior preventative 
maintenance at the Lincoln Library, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $1,000 to cover 
the cost of necessary exterior preventative maintenance at the Lin- 
coln Library, said sum to be taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of 
money from the conservation receipts reserved account to account #82 
(Conservation Commission Expense), as voted by the Annual Town Meet- 
ing on March 27, 1976, to cover the cost of engineering services and 
appraisals incurred in connection with the Town's Open Space Plan, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town transfer $5,169.69 from the conserva- 
tion receipts reserved account to account #82 (Conservation Commis- 
sion expense), as voted by the Annual Town Meeting on March 27, 1976, 
to cover the cost of engineering services and appraisals incurred in 
connection with the Town's Open Space Plan. 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum 
of money for the use of the Public Works Department to cover the 
costs associated with the clean-up of damages caused by the recent 
storm on May 9, 1977, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: To pass over the article. 



66 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums re- 
ceived by the Sealer of Weights $ Measures for use in connection 
with defraying expenses incurred by him in carrying out his respon- 
sibilities, said sums to be placed in an Agency Account and expended 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen as the occasion 
arises, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Sealer of Weights $ Measures be and hereby 
is authorized for the 1978 fiscal year to place sums received by him 
in an Agency Account, and to expend sums from this account for de- 
fraying expenses incurred by him in carrying out his responsibili- 
ties, under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. 



ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the purchase of a Class 1 Ambulance, and for nec- 
essary-expenses to be incurred in relation to the operation of said 
ambulance, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $38,000 to pur- 
chase and operate a Class 1 Ambulance, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 111C, and to meet 
said appropriation to accept a gift of $6,000 from the Order of 
Saint Anne for this purpose, with $32,000 to be raised and appro- 
priated. 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to acquire by purchase, gift, or in any other way, 
the following described parcels of land owned by Edward F. d, Henry 
R. Flint for the Town Cemetery on Lexington Road, and whether to 
provide said sum by appropriation of funds which have accumulated 
from the sale of cemetery lots, sometimes known as the Cemetery In- 
vestment Fund, by taxation, by borrowing, by transfer of other 
available funds, or by any combination of those methods, such sum 
to be added to the sum ($15,000) appropriated under Article 22 of 
the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 22, 1971, 
which was appropriated from the Cemetery Investment Funds, to ac- 
quire the first of said parcels, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Descriptions 

Parcel No. 1. A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward 
F. and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lex- 
ington Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Edward F. and 
Henry R. Flint Land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, for Town of Lincoln", 
dated January 8, 1968, as revised 1971, by Cleverdon, Varney $ Pike. 

Parcel No. 2. A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 



67 



and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled: "Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. 
Owned by Edward F. $ Henry R. Flint. Preliminary Study Plan for 
Cemetery Commission, Town of Lincoln", dated February 11, 1977, by 
Cleverdon, Varney § Pike. 
VOTED : (Under this article the following motion was voted) 

That the Selectmen are authorized in the name and on 
behalf of the Town to acquire in fee by eminent domain, purchase or 
any other way the following described parcel of land owned by Edward 
F. and Henry R. Flint for the Town Cemetery on Lexington Road, and 
for such purchase the sum of $30,000 is hereby appropriated to be 
added to the balance of $14,000 previously appropriated for the pur- 
pose of acquiring said parcel as hereinafter described under Article 
22 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 22, 1971, 
and that to meet said appropriation the sum of $30,000 is appropri- 
ated from the Cemetery Investment Fund, so-called. 

Description 

Parcel No. 1 . A certain parcel of land belonging to Edward F. 
and Henry R. Flint, situated on the northwesterly side of Lexington 
Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Edward F. and Henry R. 
Flint land in Lincoln, Massachusetts, for Town of Lincoln", dated 
January 8, 1968, as revised 1971, by Cleverdon, Varney $ Pike. 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the construction on property owned by the Town 
of a new B § M westbound commuter platform, as well as a small ex- 
tension easterly of the existing eastbound platform at the Richard- 
son Building, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VO TED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $6,200 for the 
construction on property presently owned by the Town of a new 
B § M westbound commuter platform, together with a minor relocation 
of the passenger crossings at the Richardson Building, said sum to 
be taken from free cash. 






ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 22D 
of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, which would empower the Board of 
Selectmen to adopt traffic regulations which would permit the towing 
of illegally parked motor vehicles, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town accept Section 22D of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws, which would empower the Board of Selectmen to adopt 
traffic regulations which would permit the towing of illegally 
parked motor vehicles. 



68 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to acquire for municipal 
purposes, by purchase, gift, or in any other way, from the Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust, its undivided interest consisting of 
46/325ths, more or less, in a certain parcel of vacant land consist- 
ing of approximately 3 1/3 acres, located on Old (Brooks) Road in 
Lincoln, which parcel is shown as Lot 8 on Map 28 of the Assessors' 
maps for the Town of Lincoln, and which is more particularly des- 
cribed in a deed dated December 31, 1974, and recorded with Middle- 
sex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 12745, Page 36; and to 
raise and appropriate a sum of money for such acquisition, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are authorized in the name and on 
behalf of the Town to acquire for municipal purposes, by purchase, 
gift, or in any other way, from the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust, 
its undivided interest, consisting of 46/325ths, more or less, in a 
parcel of vacant land consisting of approximately 3 1/3 acres, lo- 
cated on Old (Brooks) Road in Lincoln, which parcel is shown as Lot 8 
on Map 28 of the Assessors' maps for the Town of Lincoln, and which 
is more particularly described in a deed dated December 31, 1974, and 
recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 
12745, Page 36; to appropriate the sum of $10.00 therefor, said sum 
to be taken from free cash; and that the Selectmen are authorized 
to execute in the name of and on behalf of the Town such documents 
and agreements as may be necessary or desirable to carry out the 
provisions of this vote. 



ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
an additional sum of money, to be added to the sum appropriated 
under Article 6 of the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting on March 
26, 1977 (contract for septage disposal with the MDC) , or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town appropriate the sum of $2,375, to be 
added to the sum appropriated under Article 6 of the Warrant for the 
Special Town Meeting on March 26, 1977 (contract for septage dispo- 
sal with the MDC), said sum to be taken from free cash. 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$8,077, to be added to the sum of $28,154, voted under Article 27 
of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on March 29, 1975 for the 
construction and/or improvement of Town roads, said sum to be taken 
from cash received as reimbursement from the Commonwealth under 
Chapter 765, Section 4, Acts of 1972, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 
VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $8,077, to be 



69 



added to the sum of $28,154, voted under Article 27 of the Warrant 
for the Annual Town Meeting on March 29, 1975, for the construction 
and/or improvement of Town roads, said sum to be taken from cash 
received as reimbursement from the Commonwealth under Chapter 765, 
Section 4, Acts of 1972. 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will authorize the Moderator to 
appoint a committee to review the purposes for which the Pierce Park 
property, including the house, were given to the Town, and to con- 
sider the total present needs of the property, and to recommend to 
the Town at the earliest possible time a program of improvement and 
protection, including costs, and to establish priorities to accom- 
plish said program. 

VOTED : That the Moderator appoint a committee of seven to 
review the purposes for which the Pierce Park property were given 
to the Town, to consider the total present uses of the property, and 
to recommend to the Town at the earliest possible time a program of 
improvement and protection, including costs, and to establish pri- 
orities to accomplish said program, and in appointing this committee 
the Moderator shall give representation to the members of the cur- 
rent Selectmen's committee considering the Pierce House. 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will amend the vote under Article 
24 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on March 26, 1977, 
by increasing the borrowing authorization under said vote from 
$150,000 to $180,000, or any other sum, and by including the instal- 
lation of an eight-inch water main, together with appropriate hy- 
drants and fittings, in Page Road, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the vote under Article 24 of the Warrant for 
the Annual Town Meeting held on March 26, 1977, is hereby amended 
by increasing the borrowing authorization from $150,000 to $180,000 
and by adding under the authorization under said vote the authority 
to install an eight inch water main together with appropriate hy- 
drants and fittings in Page Road, said vote as amended to read as 
follows: 

" MOVED : That the Water Commissioners are hereby 
authorized to install ten inch water mains in Concord Road and Old 
Concord Road to replace existing obsolete and inadequate six inch 
mains and to install an eight inch water main in Page Road, together 
in each case with appropriate hydrants and fittings, and that the 
sum of $180,000 is hereby appropriated therefor, and to meet said 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to borrow the sum of $180,000 under the provisions 



70 



of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (5) and to issue bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor, payable in accordance with said Chapter 
44, so that the whole loan shall be paid in not more than fifteen 
years from the date of issue of the first bond or note, and that the 
appropriate officers of the Town are hereby authorized to apply for 
any available state and federal aid for this project, and that any 
such aid received shall be applied and is hereby appropriated toward 
the expenses of the project." 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote 
under Article 16 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting on 
March 23, 1974, by transferring the money appropriated for the re- 
building of the Garland Cabin to an account to be used in establish- 
ing a youth center, if a suitable plan satisfactory to the Selectmen 
can be devised. 
VOTED : To pass over the article. 



At 11:45 p.m. there being no further business to come before 
the meeting, it was voted to adjourn. 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 












71 



SPECIAL ELECTION 
June 21, 1977 



The polls were opened by Town Clerk, Elizabeth J. Snelling, 
at 8:00 a.m. who was aided throughout the day by Wardens, William 
G. Langton, Peggy P. Elliott and Harold E. Lawson. The polls 
were declared closed by Mrs. Snelling at 8:00 p.m. The total 
number of votes cast was 591 (total number of registered voters 
for this election - 3,166). The following results were recorded: 



Senator in General Court 
5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



Carol C. Amick 
Michael A. Caira 
Parker Weaver 
Blanks 



(Democratic) 438 

(Republican) 149 

(American) 2 

2 



Elizabeth J. Snelling, Town Clerk 



72 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION COMMITTEE 

Jean Smith 

Cecilia Ives 

John Ritsher 

Lex Taylor 

Patricia Morse, Chairperson 

In 1976 the Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Committee re- 
viewed the status of the Town's efforts to expand employment, con- 
tracting, and housing opportunities to minorities and women and found 
that, with few exceptions, little was being done to overcome obstacles 
to the inclusion of minorities. The Committee attempted to provide 
technical information and a simple mechanism for assisting the vari- 
ous Town Boards and Committees with affirmative action efforts. 

In the fall of 1977, the Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity 
Committee again reviewed progress toward the implementation of the 
Town's equal opportunity policy: 

Employment : No significant affirmative action efforts were under- 
taken by any employing unit within the Town. No outreach efforts 
were made to recruit minority applicants, and no minorities were 
hired. Although six minority professionals are employed by the 
Lincoln Public Schools, there are no minority teachers at Hartwell- 
Smith-Brooks and only one at Hanscom. Several consultant positions 
were filled over the past year for various limited projects. Recruit- 
ment and selection for these positions was done through a closed, 
word-of -mouth system. 

Contracting: No effort of any kind was made to provide opportunities 
for minority contractors to bid or subcontract on Town projects. 

Housing: No effort to expand minority housing opportunities in the 
Town was made. 

Throughout 1977, a major focus of concern in the Town has been 
land-use and the preservation of open space. Substantial planning 
and activity has been invested in projects which would remove land 
from the market. No similar planning investment and research has 
been undertaken to provide for a balance of housing and open- space 
and to minimize the racially exclusionary characteristic of housing 
development in the Town. 

In October, 1977, the Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity 
Committee and the League of Women Voters of Lincoln co-sponsored an 



73 



address by Paul Davidoff , Director of the Suburban Action Institute 
of New York, on the topic of balanced land-use planning. While 
interest in balanced planning clearly exists, it has not reached a 
level of development equal to that of planning for conservation. 

The record of the Town's progress in the area of equal oppor- 
tunity for 1977 is extremely poor. Despite the existence of an 
equal opportunity policy and the availability of technical and other 
assistance from the Affirmative Action Committee; despite the desig- 
nation of a compliance officer, Tim Grobleski, and the circulation 
of minority resource lists; such relatively simple functions as em- 
ployment and contracting have continued to be done in ways that pro- 
mote insiders and maintain arbitrary barriers to minority participa- 
tion. While ignorance and lack of resources to effect affirmative 
action could excuse this dismal record in the past, no adequate ex- 
cuse exists for the poor performance in 1977. In view of the very 
substantial efforts in the Town to remove large parcels of land from 
the private market, it is particularly regrettable that inadequate 
attention has been given to the potential impact of such trends on the 
racially isolated residency patterns which already exist. In the 
absence of well-defined planning for the inclusion of minorities in 
housing of all price levels within the Town, the new trends in land 
control may more deeply entrench our racially exclusionary character. 






74 



r- o 


o 

o 


cn 




o 

NO 


rr 




cm 


O CM 

l— 1 i-H 


CJ 




o in 

00 ^H 


o 
o 

o 


00 


00 


CM 


nO 


f— i 
oo 

NO 


CN 


r-1 tO 
NO 00 


CN 




to in 

nO 




tO 

nO 


to 

nO 

r-H 


CM 


to 

nO 
0> 


NO 


NO 

o 


oo r^ 

NO O 
00 (Nl 


O 

o 








•H 


f— I 




00 


00 


'-' 




•H 





* 


* 




* 


* 




oo 


<*• 


o 


o 


CN 


<T> 


in 


l-H 


00 


to 


0> 


o> 


NO 


l-H 


NO 








t 


r* 


t>- 


<*■ 


^r 


Ol 


r~- 


NO 





o 


o 


o\ 


on 


oo 


00 


ON 


on 


NO 


NO 






r-^ 


r- 


o> 


01 



2 fc 

**« LU 

q: 
or 

LU 

or 



NO 
NO 


o 
in 


o 


NO 
CM 


to 
o> 
o 


00 

oo 


O 


NO 


o 



o 


o 


o- 


r> 


r- 


(V 


00 


CO 


00 


cc 






o 


c 


■^ 


*» 



o- o 

O NO 


o 
o 


nO 


o 


o 

nO 


* 
* 

NO 


* 

CM 


CM 

NO 


O CM 

in <-* 


NO 


NO CN 

<a- m 

00 i-H 


o 
o 

o 


00 

ON 
ON 


NO 

00 


CM 

in 

i— t 


in 
in 

o 


NO 
ON 

to 


in 


*t to 
r^ oo 

NO o 


NO 






















00 CM 

o> m 
m 


in 
r-- 


m 

CM 


00 
0> 

in 


CN 

in 


o> 

00 


CM 

NO 

00 


r-- 
to 

o> 


on r^ 

CM o 

r- cm 















»J 










r^ 


r>» 










•H 










r-- 


i*» 










(A 






NO 




■^v. 


v* 










c 






f» 




o 


o 










Ck 






V» 




to 


to 






NO 




8 






o 




^ 


^^ 






r^ 




Q 






to 




NO 


NO 






^ 






t/1 




■»«* 




1 


1 






o 




1*4 


TD 




\D 




NO 


NO 






to 




O 


C 


NO 






K 


r^ 


t^- 


h- 


^ 






3 


r* 


*-> 




*^ 


^ 


h* 


r^ 


NO 




V 


U. 


V. 


•H 




r— ( 


F— 1 


s 


^^ 


•4-> 




«-> 




o 


10 




^^ 


^"^ 


o 


O +J 


0) 'H 


CJ 


co 


i— i 


to 


o 




!«• 


r- 


to 


to -H 4) 


o </> 


U 


o 


CO 


*s 


p. 


0) 






>s 


"V. W CJ 


c o 


•H 


. — 1 


fH 


NO 


9 


CJ 


to 


V) 


NO 


nO O -h 


co p,<+h 


IH 


0> 




T3 


•H 


•M 


*-> 




Ql,IM 


i-H <u 


<+- 


•H 


c 


10 




n+h 


Cu 


C 


10 


10 CJ 4-1 


co T3 


o 


+-> 


o 


e 


C 


Mh 




CO 


o 


<U T3 O 


Xi 


1 


h 


CJ 


u 


o 


O 


0) 


U 


o 


CJ 1 


c 


c 


cj 




c 






o 


u 


c 


C C C 


x: o 




U 




CO 


JZ 


c 


a 


CO 


CO 


CO O »- 


«/> 








r— 1 


IT) 


HH 


cr: 


2 


l-H 


(—4 


co 








rt 


CO 




* 




CO 


CO 


u 








CO 


U 








0Q 


OS 





o 






iV 






•H 






3 






cr 






U 






CO 






'-0 













+J 






CO 






o 












l+- 


n 




•H 


8 




«J 


- 




h 


n 




<u 


CO 




CJ 


•H 




<+- 


•a 




o 


c 




4-* 


ja 




M 









i-H 




o 


CO 




HO 


4) 




+J 


n 




»H 




*J 


CO 


o 


c 


O 


•j 


Oj 


J^- 




E 


<L> 


M 


•J 


Q 


3 


h 




O 


ct 


N4-I 


•H 


p, 


O 


> 


OJ 




QJ 


Q 


O 


Ph 




•M 


Dh 


y* 


B] 




<D 


U 


n 


|J 


•H 


c 


CO 


14- 


CO 


2= 


•H 


c 




■M 


i-H 


E 


^ 




O 


CJ 


X 


M 


U 


u 


<+-l 




id 




C£ 


h 


n 


B 


o 


h 




a 


■j 


»H 


E 


<+- 


3 


o 


v, 


4-* 


4-» 


c 


id 




cO 


E 


C+-I 


b 




O 


■M 


a 






— 


8 


o 


3 


a 


c 


■— i 


w 




CJ 


oo 


^-< 


c 


•H 


o 




CJ 


n 




^ 


CO 


M 




bC *-> 


tC 




C 







cO 


l*X 


-o 


^i <+^ 


3 


»H 


o 


l-H 


CO 


1 


U 


2 


X 


c 




■j 




-.o- 


A 


n 


L0 


M 


«j 


♦-> 


CJ 


a 


D.T3 




•H 


3 










CJ 


U 


U 





a 


c 


a: 


B£ 





75 



to 
o 


i-H 


to 


o 


to 


CM 


o 
o 


o 


CM 


CM 
CM 


CM 


00 

lo 


o 
o 
oo 




rsi 
O 
"3- 




o 
o 
o 


00 
00 


to 

00 


CM 


tO 
CM 


to 

CM 


r- 


CM 


O 
to 
to 


LO 

i— 1 


o 
o 
to 


o 


o 
cm 


o 



t>0 

C 

U 

i 

> 

& 



o 


o 


00 

00 


00 

oo 






o 


o 



to 

C?> 


i-H 


to 

i-H 


O 


\0 

to 


rt 

CM 


o 

o 


en 


oo 

LO 


O 

o 

00 




CM 

o 




o 
o 
o 


oo 

CM 

to 


to 

CM 


r-~ 


CM 


o 
to 
to 


to 


© 
o 
to 



to 


r-- 


00 


lO 


CTi 


vO 






r». 


r^ 


o 


to 


rj 


CT> 











^ 








^ 




CO 


M 






r% 








C 








c 




M 


O 






r-- 








rt 


2 


2 




rt 




C 


<4H 






— 


o 


d 


/ V 


0Q 






/ v 


00 


/ N 


•H 








o 


u 


u 






V) 


to 








> 








to 






+-> 


X 


•P 


+-» 


4-) 


6 


■M 


rt 


■P 




CO 


^s 


4-> 


■M 


o 


+-> 


c 


c 


o 


rt 


o 


CO 


CO 




^-i 


vO 


CO 


V) 


o 


c 


rt 


rt 


o 


X 


o 




c 




o 




3 


B 


< 


3 


X 


X 


< 


■M 


< 


c 


t— 1 




<U 


o 


^ 




O 


o 


o 




i— 1 




o 






X 


o 


E- 


H 


to 


u 


h 


*H 


to 


rt 


L0 


+-> 


X 




<u u 


c 






M 




<u 


<u 


W> 


S 


tJO 


5 


0) 


CO 


o 


a 


T3 


T3 


c 


+J 


s: 


s 


c 


i 


c 


<u 


(A 


W> 


•H US' 


i-H 


U 


fn 




3 






•H 


c 


•H 


2 


<U 


C 


tw 


rt 


rt 


cd 


> 








> 


o 


> 




i-H 


•H 


<P X 


J3 


> 


> 


cti 


2 


iti 


UJ 


rt 


■p 


rt 


•M 


•o 


> 


O co 




^ 


!h 


175 


rt 






CO 


s 


CO 


CO 


T3 


Ctf 


1 a 


JC 


rt 


rt 


* — ' 


X 






>—> 


CD 


w 





•H 


CO 


C '-' 


c_> 


X 


3C 




CO 


2 


z 




2 




s 


2 

































76 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 



Julia A. Bemis $ 300.00 

William W. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

George Browning 200.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William H. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Haggerty 150.00 

George Harrington 100.00 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

M. Gertrude Kelley 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Byron Lunt 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. $ Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

J. S. Wible 100.00 

$15,712.27 






77 



Perpetual Care Fund Income accumulated at 1/1/77 $10,144.71 

Income received 1/1/77-6/30/77 694.98 

$10,839.69 

Accumulated income at June 30, 1977 $ 10,839.69 

LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1977 $ 5.55 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 5.55 



Bank Deposits at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton- Waltham Bank $ 5.55 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 379.24 

$ 384.79 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 $ 32.71 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 32. 7f 

Bank Balance at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham Bank $ 32.71 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 295.18 

$ 327.89 



78 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1977 



20,000 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000. each October 1, 1977, 
issued under the Acts of 1948 

30,000 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $10,000. each November 1, 
1978-79, issued under the Acts of 1948 

110,000 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $35,000. each November 15, 
1977-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

30,000 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000. each November 15, 
1977-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

175,000 School Project Loan, 4.00%, due $50,000. each April 1, 1978-80 
and $45,000. each April 1, 1981-85, issued under Chapter 44, 
General Laws 



Total School Loans 

Fire $ Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000. October 1, 1977, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

40,000 Municipal Purposes Loan, 4.00%, due $10,000. each April 1, 
1978-81, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

25,000 Conservation Loan, 3.5%, due $5,000. each March 1, 1978-81, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

10,000 Conservation Loan, 4.10%, due $10,000. each November 1, 1977, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

160,000 Conservation Land Loan, 4.50%, due $40,000. each June 15, 
1978-81, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

29,220 Conservation Land Loan, 4.60%, due $10,000. each April 1, 
1978-79, and $9,220. due April 1, 1980 

80,000 Swimming Pool Loan, 4.7%, due $10,000. each April 1, 1978-85 

60,000 Sanitation Land Loan, 4.7%, due $10,000. each April 1, 
1978-83, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

22,500 Codman Kitchen Loan, 5.75%, due $2,500. each July 1, 1977-85 

431,720" Municipal Loans 

1,096,720 NET DEBT 

10,000 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000. each August 15, 1977-78 

35,000 Water Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000. each June 15, 1978-84 

10,000 Water Loan, 5.60%, due $5,000. each August 15, 1977-78 

100,000 Temporary Water Loan, 2.39%, due $100,000. Nov. 15, 1977 

50,000 Temporary Water Loan, 2.39%, due $50,000. Nov. 15, 1977 



205,000 Total Water Loans 
1,301,720 TOTAL DEBT 



79 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Betty L. Lang 



REVENUE 
July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977 



Current Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



$ 273,684.37 
2,934,690.45 



$ 3,208,374.82 



Prior Years' Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



From State Local Aid Fund 
School Aid, Ch. 70 
Special Education, Ch. 71B 
Lottery 

Loss of Taxes on Public Land 
Real Estate Abatements to Veterans 
Census Reimbursement 



In Lieu of Taxes 
Carroll School 
Massachusetts Port Authority 



71.43 
41,817.38 



139,098.48 

182,081.00 

20,671.29 

82,334.25 

1,959.35 

1,817.25 



1,000.00 
22,500.00 



41,888.81 



427,961.62 



23,500.00 



Fines 

District Court 

Licenses and Permits 
Licenses 
Permits 



Grants and Gifts - Federal 
Revenue Sharing, P. L. 92-512 
Anti-recession Fiscal Assistance, 

Title II 
Air Force School 



Grants from State 
School 

Transportation 
Building Assistance 
Food Service 
Metco - Chapter 506 



99.00 
12,917.50 



68,266.00 

7,392.00 
1,860,100.00 



69,145.00 

44,129.72 

23,413.81 

219,311.00 



8,097.00 



13,016.50 



1,935,758.00 



80 



School (Continued) 
Title III ABE 

Title III ABE Supplementary 
Title IVB ESEA 
Title IVC ESEA 
Title VIB 



Other 

Highway Aid 
Library Aid 



Grants from County 
Dog Fund 

Gifts from Individuals 

Farm Animal Excise 

Tax Title Redemption 

Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Excise 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 



General Government 
Selectmen 

Treasurer § Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Conservation Commission 
Bicentennial Commission 



Public Safety 
Accident Reports 
Firearms ID 
Sale of Cruiser 
Miscellaneous 



Health and Sanitation 
Dog Innoculations 
Garbage Collection 



25,157.00 

744.40 

1,148.60 

30,400.00 

15,088.00 



54,449.95 
2,837.63 



2.75 

6,735.83 

127,635.02 

128,421.72 



716.79 
1,604.00 
107.62 
1,223.71 
375.00 
130.00 
156.00 
544.00 



546.50 
140.00 
600.00 
486.00 



420.00 
7,718.10 



$ 428,537.53 

57,287.58 

1,526.32 

1,336.50 

55.85 

4,433.51 



262,795.32 



4,857.12 



1,772.50 



8,138.10 






81 



Highway 

Sale of Automobile 
Miscellaneous 



110.00 
165.40 



275.40 



Veterans 

Reimbursement for Relief 



1,377.77 



Schools 

Rental of Facilities 

Tuitions 

School Lunch 

Air Force School Cafeteri; 



677.00 

15,015.00 

5,612.98 

24,440.33 









45,745.31 


Library 
Lost Books 
Fines 




171.54 
1,607.03 


1,778.57 


Recreation 

Summer Day Camp 
Square Dances 




7,058.00 
407.67 


7,465.67 


Cemeteries 
Sale of Lots 
Interments 
Miscellaneous 




5,157.50 
845.00 
100.00 


6,102.50 


Unclassified 

Rental of Codman 

Reimbursement - 

BC/BS, etc. 


Property 
Air Force School, 


2,139.27 
60,198.06 


62,337.33 


Interest 
On Deposits 
On Taxes 

On Motor Vehicle Excise 
On Investments 
On Federal Revenue Sharing 


55,052.31 

4,917.34 

249.86 

16,375.01 
2,010.66 





78,605.18 



Agency, Trust 5 Investment 
Dog Licenses 

Care and Custody of Dogs 
Fish $ Game Licenses 
Deputy Collector 
Grammar School Fund 
DeCordova School Equipment Fund 
Agency Account, Police Detail 
Agency Account, Pierce House 
Agency Account, Swimming Pool 



2,827.15 

486.00 

1,399.00 

588.26 

65.17 

1,289.49 

18,460.80 

3,130.00 

13,945.60 



82 



Agency, Trust § Investment (Continued) 
Agency Account, Day Camp Special Needs 
Agency Account, Campers' Insurance 
Agency Account, Conservation 
Agency Account, Codman Community Farm 
Agency Account, Center School Rental 
Agency Account, Insurance Settlements 
Agency Account, Codman Trustees 
Agency Account, Codman Barn 
Agency Account, Sealer of Weights 

§ Measures 
Tailings 

Employee Deductions 
Surplus Cash Investments 



Refunds 

Total, General Receipts 



$ 986.30 

450.00 

6,519.90 

653.64 

5,375.00 

5,310.91 

18,077.50 

3,623.00 

87.00 

1,552.98 

307,065.60 

1,175,000.00 



$ 1,566,893.30 

19,414.22 

$ 8,219,332.33 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1976 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



650,998.67 
37,704.54 



688,703.21 



$ 8,908,035.54 



Water Receipts 
Water Rates 
Hydrant Service 
Connections 
Miscellaneous 
Serial Loan 
Temporary Loans 
Interest on Temporary Loans 
Refunds 



Water Cash Balance, July 1, 1976 



104,155.69 

25,725.00 

6,075.00 

786.55 

225,000.00 

375,000.00 

3,948.60 

3,944.24 



744,635.08 
255.06 



Grant Total, Current Revenue 









744,890.14 
$ 9,652,925.68 






83 



EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977 



General Government 

Selectmen $ 1,564.45 

Finance Committee 50.00 

Financial Office 51,079.19 

Town Office 64,247.18 

Assessors 6,098.65 

Legal 10,573.42 

Town Clerk 284.49 

Election § Registration 8,613.79 

Planning Board 8,626.61 

Board of Appeals 190.00 

Conservation Commission 38,294.69 

Tree Warden 60.00 

Tree Care Program, Art. 23 (1976-77) 6,155.42 

Consulting & Engineering 34,135.35 

Town Hall 10,543.91 







$ 240,517 


15 


Protection of Persons 5 Property 








Police Department 


190,257.25 






Fire Department 


169,649.80 






Communications 


49,097.71 






Civil Defense 


609.70 






Fire $ Police Building 


9,785.93 






Inspectors of Buildings 


24,397.48 






Generator $ Shed at Police Station, 








Art. 22 (1975-76) 


11,826.38 










455,624 


25 


Board of Health 








Salaries 


14,588.26 






Expense 


6,158.54 






Inspection Service 


5,585.05 






Garbage Collection 


10,320.00 






Dog Officer & Expense 


4,469.20 










41,121 


05 


Public Works 








Salaries £ Expense 


309,678.32 






Public Works Building 


11,360.54 






Concord $ Trapelo Rd. Bike Paths, 








Art. 18 (1976-77) 


36,829.82 






Improvement of Town Roads, Art. 18 








(1977-78) 


1,220.26 






Improvement of Town Roads, Art. 28, 








(1975-76) 


4,653.32 






Alterations to P. W. Bldg. Art. 10 








(1973) 


93.50 






New Equipment, Art. 17 (1976-77) 


7,926.25 







371,762.01 



84 



Veterans' Services 

Benefits $ 994.00 

Education 

Elementary Schools $1,787,505.90 

Metco, Chapter 506 136,637.54 

Regional High School 665,206.27 

Vo-Tech High School 80,951.00 

Air Force School 1,844,295.05 

Air Force School Cafeteria 40,704.43 

School Lunch 12,497.08 

Title II ESEA 845.00 

Title III ABE 31,271.57 

Title IVB ESEA 1,550.49 

Title IVC ESEA 30,400.00 

Title VIB 1,752.00 



Library 

Salaries $ Expense 108,010.12 

Library Building 17,982.23 

Library Repairs, Art. 25 (1976-77) 36,867.91 

LSCA Enrichment Grant, Title I 3,275.00 



Recreation 

Salaries 19,656.56 

Expense 6,604.55 

Youth Director, Salary £ Expense 4,543.64 



Cemeteries 

Interments 564.37 

Maintenance £ Expense 4,546.22 

Cemetery Land, Art. 22 (1971) 1,000.00 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 4,060.60 



Town Debt Service 

Serial Bonds 227,500.00 

Interest on Bonds 50,811.62 

Interest on Temporary Loan 110.63 



Unclassified 

Middlesex County Pension Fund 94,988.00 

Employee Hospital § Insurance Fund 109,989.91 

Property § Indemnity Insurance 65,673.81 

Town Reports 3,532.97 

Celebration Committee 1,737.03 

Regional Planning 574.25 

Affirmative Action Committee 280.00 

Historical Commission 587.20 

Dog Pound, Art. 12 (1973) 195.30 



85 



4,633,616.33 



166,135.26 



30,804.75 



10,171.19 



278,422.25 



Unclassified (Continued) 

Bicentennial Celebration, Art. 18 

(1974-75) $ 2,157.74 

Bicentennial Funds, Art. 24 (1975-76) 3,300.50 
Minute Man Home Care, Art. 11 

(1976-77) 198.00 

Council on Aging, Art. 12 (1976-77) 432.14 

Fratto Settlement, Art. 5 (1976-77) 6,000.00 

MDC Assessment, Art. 6 (1976-77) 4,750.00 



Refunds 

Motor Vehicle Excise 6,624.86 

Real Estate Tax 6,903.54 

General 176.00 



Agency, Trust 5 Investments 

Fish $ Game Licenses 1,302.50 

Dog Licenses due County 2,094.25 

Care § Custody of Dogs 20.00 

Agency Account, Police Detail 18,639.63 

Agency Account, Pierce House 3,030.00 

Agency Account, Deputy Collector 620.20 

Agency Account, Conservation 5,116.30 

Agency Account, Swimming Pool 15,855.87 
Agency Account, Day Camp Special 

Needs 1,182.95 

Agency Account, Senior Camp 320.00 
Agency Account, Codman Community 

Farm 686.50 

Agency Account, Codman Barn 2,095.17 

Agency Account, Insurance Settlements 2,357.55 

Agency Account, Center School Rental 2,389.29 
Agency Account, Fire $ Police 

Contributions 616.86 
Agency Account, Bicentennial 

Celebration 2,611.50 

Agency Account, Library Microfilm 800.00 

Surplus Cash Investment 700,000.00 



State $ County Assessments 

State Recreation Areas 29,602.70 

State Audit Assessment 944.07 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 725.10 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 891.34 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 77,282.40 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 564.73 

County Tax 217,032.59 

County Hospital 5,833.50 



$ 294,396.85 



13,704.40 



759,738.57 



332,876.43 



86 



Employee Deductions 



$ 301,180.73 



Total Expenditures 






$ 7,931,065. 


22 


Cash Balance, June 30, 1977 










General 




$ 937,657.62 






Federal Revenue Sharing 




40,887.70 


978,545. 


,32 




$ 8,909,610. 


.54 


Water Department 










Salaries 




225.00 






Wages 




36,000.00 






Expense 




55,946.11 






Bonds 




20,000.00 






Interest on Bonds 




3,570.00 






Water Mains, Art. 17 (1975- 


•76) 


549.79 






Water Mains, Art. 13 (1976- 


•77) 


184,578.31 






Water Mains, Art. 24 (1977- 


•78) 


68,173.96 






Addition to Pumping Station, 








Art. 15 (1976-77) 




6,507.55 






Insurance Settlement 




373.12 






Temporary Loans 




265,000.00 






Interest on Temporary Loans 




3,916.00 






Refunds 




776.40 


645,616. 


,24 


Water Cash Balance, June 30, 


1977 




97,698. 


,90 



Grand Total Expenditures 



743,315.14 
9,652,925.68 






87 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



General Accounts 



Assets 



Cash 



General 
General P. 
Water 



L. 92-512 



Advances for Petty Cash: 
Collector 
Treasurer 
Police 

School Administration 
School Instruction 
Air Force School 
Air Force School Cafeteri? 
Library 
Education #23 
Recreation 



Accounts Receivable: 



937,657.62 
40,887.70 
97,698.90 



20.00 

130.00 

25.00 

50.00 

150.00 

150.00 

30.00 

30.00 

50.00 

100.00 



$ 1,076,244.22 



735.00 



Taxes : 

Levy of 1970 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1971 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1972 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1973-74 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1974-75 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1975-76 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1976-77 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1972 



105.20 

108.80 

114.00 

190.00 

135.96 

102.24 
9,590.68 

211.45 
59,508.23 



434.14 
379.03 



70,066.56 



88 



Motor Vehicle Excise (Continued) 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 



Tax Titles 



600.89 

1,639.08 

4,630.62 

11,609.52 

51,305.95 



70,599.23 
1,499.74 



Departmental 
Board of Health 



Garbage 



Collection 
Veterans' Benefits 






778.00 
207.87 


985.87 


Water 
Rates 
Miscellaneous 






4,186.08 
199.47 


4,385.55 


Aid to Highways 
State 
County 






8,053.83 
5,185.96 


13,239.79 


Loans Authorized: 










Water Mains 
Bicycle Paths 
Land Acquisition 






180,000.00 

30,000.00 

300,000.00 


510,000.00 


Unprovided for or Overdrawn 
Underestimates 1976-77 
County Tax 
County Hospital 


Accounts: 


26,344.98 
3,545.25 


29,890.23 


Overlay Deficits 
Levy of 1971 
Levy of 1975-76 






48.96 
20,946.09 


20,995.05 


Overdrawn 

Codman Community Farm 








157.29 


Revenue 1977-78 








4,116,574.51 


Transfers Several Accounts 


1977- 


78 




268,328.46 


Water Receipts (to be collected) 


1977-78 




159,850.00 










$ 6,343,551.50 



89 



Debt Accounts 

Assets 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 

Inside Debt Limit 

General $ 806,720.00 

Outside Debt Limit 

General $ 290,000.00 

Public Service Enterprise 280,000.00 

570,000.00 

TOTAL $ 7,720,271.50 



General Accounts 
Liabilities and Reserves 
Temporary Loans: 



In Anticipation of Serial Loans 




$ 150,000 


00 


Agency: 








County Dog Licenses 


$ 1,245.65 






Dog Care and Custody 


466.00 






Deputy Fees 


135.66 






Division of Fish 5 Game 


96.50 






Garland Cabin 


5,553.74 






Codman Barn 


1,706.79 






Conservation Commission 


1,513.65 






Insurance Settlements 


3,201.42 






Unidentified Federal Tax Refund 


83.43 






Day Camp, Special Needs 


346.35 






Swimming Pool 


8,205.61 






Employee Deductions 


12,364.37 






Senior Camp 


130.00 






Sealer of Weights § Measures 


87.00 










35,136 


17 


Tailings: 








Unclaimed checks 


1,552.98 






Unidentified Auditors' Receipts 


9.07 










1,562 


05 


Trust Fund Income: 








DeCordova School Equipment Fund 


1,286.49 






Grammar School Fund 


81.32 










1,367 


81 


Federal Grants: 








Title II ESEA 


32.22 






Title III ABE 


417.18 







90 



Federal Grants (Continued) 



Title IVB ESEA 




$ 435.25 






Title VIB 




13,336.00 






Air Force School 




112,978.31 


$ 127,198 


96 


Revolving Funds: 










Lunch Program 




2,921.83 






Air Force School Cafeteria 




2,393.37 






Met co, Chapter 506 




97,622.39 


102,937 


59 


Appropriation Balances: 










General 




132,136.53 






General, P. L. 92-512 




1,294.28 






Water 




93,672.94 


227,103 


75 


Loans Authorized and Unissued: 






360,000 


00 


Overestimates: 










State 










Recreation Areas 




1,658.29 






MBTA 




142.60 






Metropolitan Air Pollution 


Control 


23.98 






Special Education 




2.00 


1,826 


87 


Receipts Reserved for Appropriations: 








County Dog Fund 




1,526.32 






Cemetery Improvement Fund 




39,071.09 






In Lieu of Taxes 




3,500.00 






Anti-recession Fiscal Assistance 


7,392.00 






State Aid: 










Highway, Ch. 283 




24,000.00 






Conservation Receipts 




34,179.66 






Library 




5,675.26 


115,344 


33 


Payroll Deductions: 










Group Insurance 




85.74 






Blue Cross Blue Shield 




5,472.36 







Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1974-75 
Levy of 1976-77 



91.79 
24,366.62 
13,098.33 



5,558.10 
4,105.60 



37,556.74 



91 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise $ 70,599.23 

Tax Title 1,499.74 

Departmental 985.87 

Water 4,385.55 

Aid to Highways 13,239.79 

$ 90,710.18 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 735.00 

Surplus Revenue: 

General 247,085.30 

P. L. 92-512 39,593.42 

Water 10,766.66 

297,445.38 

Appropriation Control 1977-78 4,448,847.97 

Appropriation Control Special Articles 1977-78 176,265.00 

Appropriation Control Water 1977-78 159,850.00 



Debt Accounts 
Liabilities and Reserves 

Serial Loans: 

Inside Debt Limit 

Fire and Police Station 5,000.00 

Land Acquisition 284,220.00 

School 375,000.00 

Municipal 40,000.00 

Swimming Pool 80,000.00 

Codman Kitchen 22,500.00 



Outside Debt Limit 

School 290,000.00 

Water 280,000.00 



$6,343,551.50 



806,720.00 



570,000.00 
TOTAL $ 7,720,271.50 



92 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Joseph W. Howard 

Evan Y. Semerjian 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 



The past year was one of readjusting to the implementation of 100% 
values as of January 1, 1978. As the result of the action taken at the 
Annual Meeting in March, the Board was also engaged in furnishing informa- 
tion to the various groups involved in the Land Use Project, as well as 
attending many of the neighborhood meetings. Prior to the Land Use Con- 
ference in November, the Board furnished data to all owners of open land 
on the proposed valuations and estimated taxes for fiscal 1979. 

During 1977 there was an increase in those owners wishing to classify 
their land, or a part of it, as agricultural land under Chapter 61A, which 
allows the Assessors to apply a much lower valuation. There was also an 
increase in conservation restrictions, either permanent or term. Informa- 
tion on 61A may be obtained from the Assessors, and on conservation re- 
strictions from the Selectmen and the Conservation Commission. 

By February, 1978, the Board will have issued proposed 100% valuation 
figures to those owners having developed land, along with estimated taxes 
for the 1979 fiscal year. With this information in the taxpayers' hands, 
there will be ample opportunity to discuss the revaluation with the Assess- 
ors, prior to the final preparation of the tax bills. 

As an aid in understanding the approach used by the Board in arriving 
at assessments on open land, the statement issued by the Board at the Land 
Use Conference is herewith reprinted. 






STATEMENT OF BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



November 19, 1977 



To All Citizens of Lincoln: 



The assessors have completed their proposed 100% revaluation of open 
land parcels and are now in the process of completing their proposed 100% 
revaluation of developed parcels. The open land proposed revaluations 
were mailed to the assessed owners this week. The proposed revaluations of 
developed parcels should be ready for mailing in the next few weeks. The 
complete list of all proposed revaluations will be available for inspection 
at the Town Hall by any interested citizen. 

The proposed 100% revaluation is intended to take effect for the 1978- 
1979 fiscal tax year based on assessed valuations as of January 1, 1978. 

With respect to open land, there are many differences in the various 
proposed revaluations of parcels because of the great diversity of open land 
in Lincoln in terms of area, wetlands, restrictions and other features. Each 
proposed revaluation is the assessors' best judgment of fair market value as 



93 



of January 1, 1978, in view of all conditions, restrictions and available 
information as of that assessment date with respect to each parcel. 

In arriving at each proposed revaluation, the assessors have considered 
a number of factors, including the following: 



a. 
b. 
c. 
d. 


wetlands 
frontage 
access 
encumbrances 


g 

h 
i 

3 


shape 

percolation 
terrain 
backlands 


e. 
f. 


recent sale price 
area 


k 

1 


conservation restrictions 
agricultural classification 



The results of the proposed revaluation are to increase both the total 
assessed value of open land and the total tax on open land as follows: 



Total assessed value 
Total Tax: 



Present 

$916,300 
$63,407.95 



Proposed 

$6,588,900 
$171,311.40 



Because of revisions and refinements of the various assessments, to- 
gether with an increase in the number of parcels subject to conservation and 
other restrictions, the proposed revaluations are not as high as the former 
proposed revaluations of June, 1976. 

After 100% revaluation becomes effective in Lincoln, the assessors in- 
tend to update all assessments on an annual basis regarding both open and 
developed land to take into account all relevant new market data, general 
appreciation of property values, changes in conditions and other pertinent 
information. As a result, it is hoped that the Town will avoid obsolescence 
and unfairness in assessments from year to year by keeping them current. 



The assessors will be glad to meet with any taxpayer in the weeks 
and months ahead regarding questions or comments on his or her proposed ass- 
essment. 

Respectfully, 

Douglas M. Burckett 
Joseph W. Howard 
Evan Y. Semerjian 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Some regulations with which you should be familiar are printed below: 

1. The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of the 
tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year involved. 



94 






Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications must 
be filed with the Board by July 1 of the year succeeding the year 
involved. If cars are changed during the year, it is the tax- 
payer's responsibility to file an abatement application. 

Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, as amended, 
provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for taxpayers who 
meet certain age, financial, etc., qualifications. Additional 
information may be obtained from the Assessors' office. All 
applications under Clause 41 must be filed with the Board by De- 
cember 15 of the year involved. 

Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A, provides for the deferral of 
real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional in- 
formation may be obtained from the Assessors' office. All appli- 
cations under this clause must be filed by December 15 of the year 
involved. 

Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple Heart 
awards, and others, may qualify for a partial exemption. Addi- 
tional information about these exemptions may be obtained from 
the Assessors' office. 



1977-1978 Recapitulation 

Appropriations to be raised by taxation $ 4,116,574.51 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 750,555.15 

Overlay deficits of previous years 20,829.95 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet estimated receipts 262,458.25 

State assessments 163,594.65 

County assessments 240,720.53 

Overlay current fiscal year 39,479.84 

Gross amount to be raised $ 5,594,212.88 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Estimated receipts from State $ 722,808.46 

Over-estimates for prior years, State 5 County 4,115.12 

Local estimated receipts 359,143.36 

Amounts voted to be taken from available funds 750,555.15 

Total estimated receipts and available funds $ 1,836,622.09 

Amount to be raised by taxation 3,757,590.79 

$ 5,594,212.88 



95 



Total Valuation: 

Personal Property $ 4,785,145 at $69.20 $ 331,132.03 

Real Estate 49,515,300 at $69.20 3,426,458.76 

$54,300,445 $ 3,757,590.79 



Tax rate per thousand (1977-1978): 

School rate $40.80 

General Rate 28.40 

$69.20 



96 



m 


t^ 


U 


r-~ 


c 


\ 


03 


o 


1 — i 


to 


03 


^ 


cc 


\D 



c 
CM 


o 

oc 


c 

o 


c 
c 


vO 00 




to 


LO 

o 


00 

o 

r— 1 


1 — 1 


o 

01 

1— 1 


LO O 

to o> 

rH LO 


(N 
© 
i— l 


oc 
O 

LO 

01 

LO 



O 00 CM 



^- ffl o o> O Ol i/l 

to r-- o to to o o 

TJ- to v£) \© vO vO to 

<-* ^ rH f-H 



r~~ ^h 



en \o 
un 
o 



LO 


t mo 
oto 


to 


"3- 

o 


o 
o 




CM vD 00 

en en cm 

00 LO 


to 
o 

CM 


to 
to 


o 
o 

CM 



10 


LO CM tO 


o> 


o 


r- lo 




00 rH LO 


1— 1 


vO 


to 00 


LO CM O 


^o 


•*r 


rr LO 


•M 


HMO 


r- 


r^ 


00 LO 


y 


tO «rj- 




oo 


vO 


o 


•> «. 




•> 


•> 


r—t 


rsi oi 




<<r 


to 


i-H 


to 




to 


r^ 


o 






o> 


CM 


o 






• 





LOtOTjcNioorMh- 

r--oor-tr^r-ioovo 

(NLOvOf-tOoooor-- 
to to cm oo to t-^ r-^ 
r- \o n- to to oo cm 

vO r- oo -^r to cm -h 
cm cm o 






O 

o en 



_J en 

O rH 



o 


to o 


to 


en 


CM 00 


00 


00 


CM CM 


vO 


CM 


CM O 


to 


o 


CM 










00 


LO 




CM 


CM 





i-H tO O rH LO CM LO 

lo vo rr oo \D lo to 

LO CM vO CM C^ O Ol 

cm to cm lo to ^r -3- 

MN O i-h 

i-H CM 



LO 

i— 1 


LO LO 

vO 00 


r- en to lo o 

LO r-t o VO o 


CM 
CM 


en 

CM 

LO 


CM LO 

tO LO 

Ol 


LO O Cn 00 vO 
vf Ol LO tO i-t 

\0 vO vO to i— i 


i— 1 

oo 

LO 










i— i 
o 


to 

CM 


CD N N •* f 
Cn 01 


o 



rH LO 



CM l-H 



o 


vO 


O 


c 


O 


LO 


00 


tO 




o 


r- 


CM 


00 


o 


oc 


5 


■rj- 




c 


>v 
















tt 


O 


LO 


oc 


^r 


LO 


00 


i— i 




r-l 


to 


o 


c 


H 


c 


o 


■ — i 




Of 


"^ 


i-H 


i-H 


r— 1 


CM 


LO 


CM 




CC 


O 








•> 

•M 

ai 


CM 



03 


LO 

03 








<u 


0> 


O 


•M 


■M 


■M 


l-H 






4-> 


•M 


+-> 


to 


oo 


(/) 


03 






03 


03 


rt 


LU 


LU 


UJ 


C 






•M 


•M 


•M 








O 






w 


co 


IT, 








^ 






u 


LU 


LU 


o3 


o3 


03 


0) 






i-H 


,— i 


rH 


Ci 


CC 


CC 


C 






cd 


03 


03 














e 


<u 


<L> 


*rr 


LO 


o 


sC 






cc 


a: 


CC 


r~- 


r- 


r- 


r^ 






o 


i— i 


CM 


to 


rr 


LO 


LO 






r-- 


r- 


r- 


r-- 


r^ 


r^ 


r^ 






cn 


CT> 


c-. 


CT> 


01 


cn 


cn 



T 1 


to 

C 


CJ> 

oc 


to 


01 


to 

00 


o 


CM 

o 


tO 
"3- 


CTi 

r- 
to 


o 
c 


c 

o 

CI 


o 
01 


'3- 

CM 

cn 


to 

"3- 


00 

o 



X ••-> rH X'H 03 

<vj w 03 *-> c a: 

rH LU C rH < 

4) O U rH 

O.H W CX, E 0) <D <U 

OO3rHOrH<U<U0O)<l>a)<l)bCC»C4-> 
rHa>a)rH03t/)t/)(/)l/>«/>(/>(/>030303 

a. 6< o. a tt, -H 'H 'H .H -ri .h -H ^ £ s 

OOUOOOOrHrH 

r-r- t^xxxxxxxo3o3\o 
r^r- MUttittiuuttitticiUN 



<U rH 

c ♦-• 
O 03 






\0rHCMtOrJ-L0v£)r-^vOt^L0\£)\O 
CnC1GiCncncncriCJ>CJ>CT>CT>CJ>CT> 



CO 

3 

o 
<u 

c 

03 

<-t *-> 

rH C rH 

0) 03 03 
O rH ■•-» 

WT3 C 

•h x a> 
s: x o: 



97 



c \ 
re o 



■— i i/"> in r-* in cm f-i 

K) M H \C H Oi O 



on 

UJ 
X 

c - 
I 
a: so 
C r- 
I- oi 



o r^ 

c \ 
rt O 
^h to 

re \ 

CO vD 



c 
4-> 

t3 
O 

& 















w 














«/) 














re 














_ 












r-- 


re 












rs» 


<-> 
o 












•«* 


•»-» 












•— t 














o 


(/} 












• 


• H 












rsi 


*■> 

o 
*J 

3 

o 

■— 1 

00 

r—t 















<4-l 








(/> 




t/> 


o 








•M 




3 










c 




O 


♦-> 






i^ 


.— 1 




X 


C 






+-> 








3 


'S- LO vO 


r- 


c 


X 




c 


O 


r- r^ r-» 


r* 


rt 


U 


</) 


re 


£ 


i i i 


i 


Jh 


o 


C 


E 


re 


to Tj- LO 


vO 


h 


+J 


0) 


T) 




r- r^ r» 


h» 


rt 


0) 


•H 


O 


<v 


d ffi o> 


01 


2= 


E 


J 


U 


e 


^H i—l .-H 


i-- 




<u 










ur 


(J 


i— 1 


4- 




♦-) 








re 


O 




V) 




t/> 


IM 


cx 




* 







"O 


O 




i— i 




^ 




C 




o 


cfl 









3 


<u 


• r-( 


4-> 




«J 




E 


f-< 


c 


c 




c 






CO 


i 


4) 

OS u 





98 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

D. James Arena, Chief 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the enforcement activities of the 
Police Department for the year 1977: 

Motor Vehicle Violations 

Using without authority 2 

Operating under the influence 4 

Operating so as to endanger 5 

Leaving the scene of an accident 1 

Operating unregistered motor vehicle 5 

Speeding 432 

Red traffic light violations 63 

Stop sign violations 38 

Illegal left turn 50 

Uninspected motor vehicle 12 

Operating without a license 16 

Defective equipment 5 

Littering from motor vehicle 3 
Various road law violations (improper passing, 

starting, stopping, etc.) 52 

In addition the Department issued a large number of parking 
tickets for violations in different areas of the Town. We were 
called upon to investigate 310 motor vehicle accidents with about a 
third of that number resulting in personal injuries to the occupants 
Unfortunately after a long absence of fatalities on our roads we 
must report that there were two fatal accidents during the year. 
In a related item the Town received a total of $9,614.00 from the 
Concord District Court representing a portion of the fines collected 
through our enforcement activities. 

Criminal Activities 

Break § entry investigations 71 

Larcenies 171 

Miscellaneous complaints requiring police response 3874 



99 



Arrests 

Motor vehicle violations 24 

Break § entry, daytime 2 

Break § entry, nighttime 2 

Arson (motor vehicle) 1 

Assault § battery on a police officer 1 

Receiving stolen property 2 

Open and gross lewdness 1 

Narcotic violations 14 

Violation of gun laws 2 

Larceny 5 

Service of warrants 20 

Protective custody 33 

Additionally the department handled innumerable alarm calls, 
checked businesses and vacant homes, assisted in emergency medical 
situations and performed many other related and non-related functions. 

In personnel matters there were a few items of interest. In 
early 1977 our newest full-time officer, Allen Bowles, completed 
the basic training course for police officers at the Boston Police 
Academy ranking high in his group. In July there was a change 
affecting the Communications Department as Mrs. Lorraine Dean was 
transferred from that department to the post of Secretary. New 
Communicators starting in July were Raymond Barnes and Gerald 
Mahoney, Jr. In November Officer James Blackburn received an 
appointment to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and is currently 
on a leave of absence from the Department. 

We continue to have the opportunity to enhance the capabili- 
ties of our officers through the courses offered by the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Training Council. During the year officers from 
the Department completed courses ranging from one day seminars to 
two week courses in the following subjects: 

Firearms Refresher Course Search Warrant Preparation 

Bomb Incidents Motor Vehicle Law 

Shotgun Familiarization Crime Scene Search 

Search £ Seizure Municipal Investigators Course 

Hostage Management Crisis Intervention 

Arson Investigation Narcotics Investigation 

During the year plans were implemented for an upgrading of 
the telephone system at the department and it is expected that this 
will be completed in early 1978. We also traded in one cruiser- 
ambulance during the year replacing same with a sedan; it is anti- 
cipated that with the new modular ambulance in service we will phase 
out the station wagon type cruisers and operate strictly with sedans 



100 






providing some savings in cost and operation. 

In closing we would offer our appreciation to our fellow Town 
employees for their cooperation in our efforts and to the citizens 
of the community for their contributions towards the law enforcement 
programs of the Department. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

During the year 1977 the Fire Department responded to a total 
of 1071 calls as listed below: 

Bomb threats 1 

Brush fires 29 

Complaints of "open burning" 11 

Investigation of "smoke" reports 51 

Assist at motor vehicle accidents 185 

Reports of water problems 111 

Utility wires down/arcing 59 

Reports of "lockouts" 29 

Building fires 17 

Motor vehicle fires 28 

Assist Police Dept/EMT service 277 

Miscellaneous or "special service" 100 

False alarms 132 

Fire inspections 16 

School drills 3 
Calls for mutual aid assistance to neighboring 

communities 3 

Hanscom Field alarms/calls 10 

Agricultural burning permits issued 907 . 

Fire alarm boxes tested 105 

During the year eight new call fire fighters joined the De- 
partment: Donald Gladu, Barry Real, Peter Gemelli, Gerald Mahoney, 
Jr., Gary Fisher, Robert Marshall, Gary Bardsley and Charles Hayes 
bringing the Department's strength to forty-five permanent and call 
fire personnel . 

The Department presently operates out of two stations: the 
headquarters station, located at Lincoln and Codman Roads has four 
pieces of fire apparatus ready for service and is maintained by a 
minimum of two fire department personnel on an around-the-clock basis 
In addition the headquarters station houses the town's ambulance, a 
snowmobile for use in emergency situations and a rescue boat. An 
additional piece of fire apparatus is housed on Mill Street in North 
Lincoln; this piece is manned by available call fire fighters. 



101 



During the year two highly useful items were donated to the De- 
partment. A "Resusi-Anne" CPR training mannikin was donated by the 
Old Town Hall Exchange and has added immensely to our emergency train- 
ing program. The highly touted Hurst Tool, also known as the "Jaws 
of Life", an expensive as well as valuable rescue tool was donated 
by the Lincoln Fire $ Police Association. To these two organizations 
we extend our sincere thanks and I am sure that the citizens of the 
Town would echo those sentiments. 

In closing we would join in thanking our fellow Town employees 
and the citizens of the community for their cooperation in making our 
efforts worthwhile. 



AMBULANCE 

At a special town meeting held in June funds were voted for the 
purchase of a new modular type ambulance to provide for the transport 
of persons requiring emergency care. These funds were supplemented 
by a generous contribution from the Order of St. Anne; for that we 
are all grateful. The ambulance was put into service in September 
and by the end of the year had made sixty- seven runs to Emerson • 
Hospital. 

By State law the ambulance is to be manned by a minimum of two 
Emergency Medical Technicians and the Town is indeed fortunate to 
have an adequate supply of trained personnel. When the current class 
finishes training at Emerson Hospital in January, 1978, we will have 
a total of thirty-four registered EMTs, that total representing 
thirty-one members of the Fire and Police Departments and three civil- 
ian volunteers. 



102 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 

Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 

This was a very quiet year as far as this Agency was concerned. 
We maintained the usual liaison with higher headquarters; our Program 
Paper was approved, which continues our eligibility for participation 
in various federal programs. Our communications continue to function 
well. Expansion of the system on which we do most of our emergency 
communicating makes the purchase of a new transceiver a necessity; 
we hope to make this purchase early in 1978. The Communications 
Section under Eric Williams is continuing to give instruction to those 
who want to qualify for amateur radio operators' licenses. Those 
interested can contact Mr. Williams through the Fire § Police Station 
(259-8113) most evenings. Mr. Williams maintains an inventory of 
licensed amateur operators and would like any who have not been in 
contact with him during the past three years to get in touch with him, 
so that his lists may be current. 

From a planning point of view, the biggest job we had this year 
was the preparation of a new Emergency Operation Plan. This covers 
emergency procedures to be followed by Town Departments, and our Plan 
is now in conformity with State standards. Annexes have to be pre- 
pared by some department heads; then the job will be complete. 

The snowstorm of May 9-10 stranded enough motorists so that we 
opened the Town Hall as a shelter for them. The Hall was in use from 
about midnight to 6 AM, by which time all were on their way. This 
small operation pointed up some needs, such as a supply of cots and 
blankets, as well as some kind of emergency food supply to be kept 
at the Town Hall. These are not major items, so the remedial action 
shouldn't be difficult or expensive. I must express my appreciation 
to Tim Grobleski for his help during the storm. 

I owe thanks to a great many, in and out of Civil Defense, for 
help during the year, and, most particularly, to those members of the 
Auxiliary Police who are always ready to serve on very short notice. 






103 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDING, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 

William M. Dean, Wiring and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 



The Massachusetts State Building Code book is now bigger than 
ever with many more amendments and additions. 

Of prime interest and concern is a new article 22. This is 
the new Energy Conservation code which affects all new construction 
and applies to many existing buildings other than one and two family 
dwellings. Article 22 provides energy conservation standards for 
all new building construction and renovation projects. Compliance 
with these energy conservation provisions is accomplished by follow- 
ing the components standards on building enclosure, mechanical sy- 
stems, service water heating, electrical power distribution and 
lighting systems or by using a systems analysis procedure that re- 
sults in an equivalent saving of energy or by using non-depletable 
energy sources such as solar or wind energy. 

Watch out for the hazards created by WOOD BURNING STOVES -- the 
State Building Code requires compliance with sections 2107.24 and 
2107.25. Specifications and plans must be submitted to the building 
department for approval. A permit will then be issued and an in- 
spection made. Some insurance companies are requiring certificates 
of approval from the building department for their protection. Many 
good books and newspaper articles have been written on this subject. 
Some are available for review at the Town Hall. 

During the year the building department issued permanent certi- 
ficates of occupancy to "Lincoln Woods" and 30 additional certifi- 
cates for cluster 3 condominiums at "Farrar Pond Village". Both 
developments are fully occupied. Permits were also issued for 13 
new houses compared with 8 in 1976. Additions and alterations in- 
creased from 30 in 1976 to 34 in 1977. 

The building department, at the request of the Board of Select- 
men will be assisting that board and all department heads in prepar- 
ing present and future schedules on yearly maintenance, repairs and 
general remodeling on Town owned buildings. With careful program- 
ming, our buildings will stay in good condition and costs will be 
spread out more evenly. 



104 



Statistics for the year are as follows: 
Values as submitted by applicants -- 



1. Buildings 

2. Plumbing and gas 

3. Electrical and fire alarm 



$1,253,722.00 
78,800.00 
58,910.00 

$1,391,432.00 



Permits issued in 1977 -- 



New residential 

Additions and alterations 

Foundations 

Sheds and garages 

Barns 

Signs 

Tents (temporary use) 

Buildings demolished 

Wood burning stoves 

Roofing 

Mini chapel 



13 

34 

1 

11 

2 

6 

3 

3 

15 

2 

_1 

91 



Fees collected -- 

Plumbing and gas fitting permits 
Fees collected 

Wiring permits 
Fees collected 

Fire alarm permits 
Fees collected 



3,534.25 

86 
' 809.00 

103 

1,692.50 



17 



170.00 



6,205.75 



105 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

George P. Faddoul, D.V.M. 
Harriet L. Hardy, M.D. (resigned) 
William B. Stason, M.D. (elected) 
Herbert A. Haessler, M.D., Chairman 

In March Dr. William B. Stason was elected to fill the vacancy 
left by the resignation of Dr. Harriet Hardy. He has joined many 
of the Board's activities with vigor and enthusiasm. The other 
members of the Board look forward to an interesting and pleasant 
association. 

Laura Perry was appointed inspector of animals. This supple- 
ments her duties as town dog officer. A compilation of her acti- 
vities follows this report. 

School nursing services continued to be supplied by the Emer- 
son Hospital as did home health care services. The contract with 
the Emerson Hospital was reviewed by the Board of Health and the 
Board found the general level of services to be very high. Nurse 
hours at the school were cut down slightly in 1977 and a second 
school health aide was added to the staff. This produces a great- 
er availability of direct care services for the students of the 
Lincoln school system. There is now a health aide in both school 
health offices during normal school hours. A separate report of 
the Emerson Hospital contract-supplied services follows this sum- 
mary. 

The school health education cirriculum was reviewed by Dr. 
Stason, representing the Board of Health; Mrs. Damon, representing 
the School Committee and the school's administration. This group 
spent the late fall and winter months formulating a school health 
policy document. School health services were reviewed, particu- 
larly those supplied by the Emerson Hospital. The maintenance of 
the school environment was reviewed and policies for the health 
characteristics of the environment were established. The health 
education curriculum was also reviewed and policies were established 
defining the role of the school nurse in health education. 



106 






Dr. David McCormick was appointed school physician and has been 
visiting the school on a monthly basis to perform health examina- 
tions and act as a medical advisor to the school's nursing staff. 

The Board of Health cooperated with the Council on Aging and 
provided two clinical activities. A glaucoma clinic was held and 
96 town residents were screened for this important eye disease. 
The Board is grateful to Dr. Don C. Bienfang for his important con- 
tributions to this clinic. An influenza clinic was also held for 
those town residents over age 65. Immunization was provided for 
78 people. 

Rabies immunization for the town's dogs was again provided at 
the annual spring dog clinic. The current vaccine being used pro- 
vides protection for two years and the Board recommends that all 
dogs be revaccinated semi-annually. 

The food handling establishments of the town were all inspected 
in the fall and the Board was happy to find a high level of clean- 
liness. 

Formal liaison was established with the Water Board. Mr. Fred 
Tingley met with the Board of Health and explained the Water Board's 
water quality monitoring procedures. At the present time, the 
Board is actively considering a proposal whereby the Water Board and 
the Board of Health share the services of a town-employed sanitary 
engineer. The Board feels that this could materially aid in main- 
taining water quality as well as lower the cost of engineering ser- 
vices needed for approval of new septic system construction. Con- 
sulting engineering services were, once again, a major item in the 
Board of Health's budget. 

The town's health regulation in relation to the construction of 
new septic systems was modified during the past year to meet the 
requirements of the new state Title 5 regulations. Builders should 
refer to these new regulations before beginning construction of 
septic systems. 

To help graphically demonstrate its concern for the health of 
all town residents, the Board sponsored a spring jogging day. The 
purpose of this day was to emphasize the importance of exercise in 
health maintenance programs. There was a good turnout of enthusi- 
astic citizens. The Board hopes that this was the first of many 
such events. 



107 



EMERSON HOSPITAL HOME CARE DEPARTMENT 

R. Faye Collins, R. N. 
Administrative Director 



The Home Care Department of Emerson Hospital continues to pro- 
vide health services to persons of all ages in their homes. These 
services are on a part-time intermittent basis. 

Home Care is recognized today as an important link in insurance 
"benefit" for which most people have pre-paid but are unaware they 
have available. For those people who qualify, home care services 
are paid for by Medicare, and Medicaid as well. When someone is 
ill at home, professional help is readily available and accessible 
to everyone. The patient, the family, a friend or the physician 
may take the initiative in requesting the service by contacting the 
Home Care office at Emerson. 

The year 1977 was an active one for the Home Care Department. 
It has been a year of expansion and growth. We began the year with 
providing services to the residents of Stow, Concord, Carlisle, and 
Lincoln. In April, the Maynard Board of Health dissolved their 
community nursing service and merged with the Emerson group. This 
was followed in November by the Town of Bedford's decision to turn 
over its morbidity health service to Emerson Home Care. These ad- 
ditions have increased the demand for services and coincidental ly 
the number of personnel has been increased to meet that demand. Two 
new' services, Speech and Occupational Therapy were added this year 
as well. Lincoln benefits from this regional health approach with 
shared costs and a greater number of services and personnel being 
made available. 

A new program was initiated this year with Emerson Hospital 
receiving a contract from Blue Cross for a Coordinated Home Care 
program. Persons having a Blue Cross Insurance policy with extend- 
ed benefits can be considered for this kind of care. Basically, any 
services available to the patient in the hospital will be delivered 
in the home with the agreement of the physician, patient and family. 
This will make earlier discharge from hospital possible and in some 
cases afford an alternative to hospitalization with Blue Cross cover- 
age of all services provided in the home. 

We have also expanded our working hours so that evening visits 
are now available by the nurse and health aide. In addition, througl 
an answering* service we are able to provide twenty- four hour nursing 



108 



availability seven days a week for prescribed procedures and consul- 
tation to our patients in the towns we serve. 

Lincoln's senior citizen clinic has been a successful project 
sponsored by the Council on Aging. Once a month, a Home Care nurse 
is available at the Pierce House to provide individual consultation 
and blood pressures. The emphasis is placed on teaching, with the 
aim being preventive, and evaluation for early detection. There 
were 181 visits made at the 10 clinics. 

Home Care Services Provided to Lincoln Residents in 1977 

Home Visits 1976 1977 

Public Health Nurse 
Lab Service 
Home Health Aide 
Physical Therapy 
Speech Therapy 
Occupational Therapy 
Medical Social Service 



413 


655 


1 


6 


380 (487 hrs.) 


613 (813 hrs.) 


15 


69 


- 


5 


- 


22 


28 


49 



837 1419 



Sources of Income for Nursing Visits in 1977 







No 


Visits 


Medicare 






444 


Welfare 









Commercial Insurance 






64 


Commission for Blind 






1 


Cancer Society 






13 


Blue Cross Coordinated 


Home 


Care 


48 


Self 






30 


Board of Health 






55 



655 



BOARD OF HEALTH NURSING : 

The Lincoln Board of Health contracts with the Emerson Hospital 
for the Home Care nurses to provide communicable disease control, 
maternal and child health supervision, and preventive health services 
traditionally considered the functions of Boards of Health. Health 
promotion, through prevention of disease, early detection, and pro- 
motion of well being is a positive approach to health that should 



109 



provide an enormous savings in health care dollars. 

Board of Health Home Visits Made By Emerson Home Care 



Home Visits 


1977 


Maternal and Child Health 


31 


Communicable Disease 


1 


Health Promotion 


5 


Total 


37 


Medically Indigent 


18 


Total Visits 


55 



A flu clinic for the elderly was held in October during which 
78 residents received free flu immunization. The cost to the Board 
of Health was $54.89 for the Home Care Service. 

The services of a qualified medical social worker from the Home 
Care staff are available to the homebound patient and family. Con- 
sultation and assistance is provided when social problems affect 
family health. The Board of Health provides a portion of this 
service, on a regional basis with 5 other towns, by purchasing 86 
hours at a cost of $832.00 for the fiscal year. 

IN THE SCHOOLS : 

As part of the Board of Health arrangement with Emerson Hospital, 
the Home Care nurses carry out the school health program. The fol- 
lowing summary of the nurses' time spent in the schools, September 
1976 to June 30, 1977, reveals the kinds of duties performed. 

Classes 3 1/2 hours 

Conferences (teachers, parents) 46 1/2 hours 

First Aid 268 3/4 hours 

Immunizations 7 1/2 hours 

Physicals 12 3/4 hours 

Records $ Reports 163 3/4 hours 

Vision-Hearing Tests 66 1/2 hours 

Pre-School Registration 1/2 hours 

Miscellaneous 49 1/2 hours 

"766" Program 69 1/4 hours 

688 1/2 hours 

The Board of Health employs two health aides to work in the 
school health rooms. The valuable assistance of these ladies in 
relieving the nurse of some of the clerical work, vision-hearing 
screening, and the simple first aid, makes it possible for the nurse 



11Q 



to be available to function in areas where her specialized knowledge 
and expertise is required. 

Student Visits to Health Rooms 










Brooks $ 






Hartwell 


Smith 


Total 


Major Accidents (requir- 








ing physicians' atten- 








tion) 


7 


17 


24 


Minor Accidents 


681 


336 


1017 


Illness-related 


439 


376 


815 


Miscellaneous 


842 


511 


1353 


Total 


1969 


1240 


3290 


Students Dismissed 


159 


103 


262 



The general laws of Massachusetts require that all persons com- 
ing in contact with children in the schools must have a Mantoux 
tuberculin skin test or chest X-ray every 3 years. The nurse gave 
19 mantoux tests with no positive reactors, and 9 employees had 
X-rays. 

In May a survey of the students' measles immunization status 
was done using the State Department of Public Health guidelines. 
Parents were notified of those students who had questionable immun- 
ization. A school clinic was heald with 68^ students receiving 
measles vaccine. 

A report of a physical examination is required on children in 
grades K, 4, and 7. When parents are unable to have this done by 
a private physician, they may request Dr. David McCormick, school 
physician, to do this in school. There were 6_ physicals done by 
the school physician last year. 

Each student in the Lincoln School system receives vision and 

hearing testing each school year. Of the 764 students tested in 

the fall of 1976, 2£ students failed the' vision testing and 4_ stu- 
dents failed the hearing tests. 

School Nursing Cost to the Board of Health: $7,792.54 

The individuals and families who live and work in the community 
are the focus for the Home Care nurses, a direct and personal exten- 
tion of the Lincoln Board of Health's concern for the health of 
its citizens. 



Ill 






MENTAL RETARDATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Serving Acton, Bedford, Boxborough, Carlisle, 
Concord, Lincoln, Littleton, Maynard, and Stow. 

Prepared by: Department of Mental Health 
Concord Area Office 
54 Walden Street 
Concord, Mass. 01742 



Information and Referral : 

Minute Man Association for Retarded Citizens 
Community Agencies Building, Concord 01742 
Edie Fruscione, Executive Director, 369-3524 

Department of Mental Health Area Office 

Trinitarian Congregational Church, 54 Walden Street, Concord 

Gary Shostak, Mental Retardation Coordinator, 369-8427, 259-0304. 

Residential Services : 

Minute Man Community Services, Inc. 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

Merrill Henderson, Director, 259-0942, 369-5695. 

Minute Man Community Services, Inc. currently operates three 
residential programs, two Community Residences and one Cooperative 
Apartment Program. The Women's Residence, located in Maynard, 
serves eight women. The Men's Residence, located in Concord, 
serves eight men and is able to accommodate two men who are physi- 
cally handicapped. 

Each residence has a staff of three managers who live with the 
clients and provide instruction, guidance, and support in all as- 
pects of daily living. Training is provided in the areas of hand- 
ling money and budgeting, food purchasing, menu planning, cooking, 
household skills, grooming and hygiene, basic academic skills, 
social skills, use of leisure time and orientation to the larger 
community. The clients use ordinary community resources for medi- 
cal and dental services and have access to the services provided by 
Department of Mental Health staff, Concord Family Service, and the 
Eliot Clinic. Local recreation and adult education programs are 
used by residents. As part of the program each resident has a 
daytime activity outside the residence, which may be a job, a shel- 
tered workshop, or a day activity program. 



112 



The Cooperative Apartment Program provides opportunities to 
mentally retarded adults who are capable of independent living with 
certain assistance. People in this program live in their own apart- 
ments and are in contact on a regular basis with a staff person who 
provides help and support in areas such as budgeting, shopping, 
menu planning, and solving problems which arise in the course of 
daily living. Social services are provided by Concord Family Ser- 
vice and Department of Mental Health staff. Program members work 
in the community or in sheltered work environments and are assisted 
in finding employment by program staff. 



Day Activity Programs : 

Minute Man Workshop 

40 Stow Street, Concord 

Barbara Hanson, Director, 369-5036 

This program provides a Social/Pre-Vocational training program 
50 weeks a year for functionally retarded persons 17 years of age 
or older. Applications for admission are available from the Pro- 
gram Director. The program provides non-residential coordinated 
training and educational activities designed to foster social, dom- 
estic, and self-care skills necessary for more competent and inde- 
pendent life in the community. The program is operated daily from 
9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Sheltered Workshop Programs : 

Sheltered Workshop and Work Training Programs are not generally 
available within the nine town area. Individual arrangements may 
be made by contacting John Noyes at 369-2Q96, 369-3524, 369-8427. 



Recreation Services : 

Minuteman Recreation Program 

40 Stow Street 

Concord, Mass. 01742 

Barbara "Casey" Clark, Recreation Director 

The program is an adult social and recreation program which 
includes a Social Club, dramatic workshops, an Activity Center for 
arts and craft instruction, swimming and special events. These 
include dances, dinners in local restaurants, trips to Theatre, 
Ice Follies, Museums, etc. The program utilizes existing com- 
munity recreational activities in order to encourage normal life 
styles for the program members. For information regarding 






113 



membership and activity schedules call "Casey" Clark at 369-5036, 

Town of Concord Recreation Department 
S.P.E.C. 

The Special Program for Exceptional Children (SPEC) is a 
regional recreation program for retarded children ages 3 to 18 
years. 

The program is held at the Trinitarian Congregational Church 
on Walden Street, Concord. The hours are 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
weekdays beginning June 26 through August 18, 1978. 

Participants are grouped homogeniously by age and ability levels 
so that they may better enjoy the Recreational and Education pro- 
grams offered. 

Opportunities include: Swimming Instruction, Arts and Crafts, 
Bowling, Athletics, low organized games, Music, individual tutor- 
ing and other projects designed to continue progress made during 
the school year. 

Applications and other information about the program is avail- 
able at the Concord Recreation Department, 1276 Main Street, Con- 
cord. Telephone number is 369-6460. 

Social Services : 

Adult Social Work Services 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

John Noyes, Social Worker, 369-2096, 369-3524, 369-8427. 

Mr. Noyes is a Department of Mental Health Social Worker re- 
sponsible for providing social work services to adult retarded 
individuals who leave state institutions to return to the community. 
These services include, but are not limited to: individual and 
group counseling, job placement, and assistance with utilizing 
community services and programs. 

These services are also provided to adult retarded individuals 
and their families living in the community. 



Social Work Services for Children and Families : 

Eliot Clinic and Minute Man Association for Retarded Citizens 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

Carola Domar, Social Worker, 369-1113 



114 



Mrs. Domar provides social work services to retarded children 
and their families. These services include individual and family 
counseling as well as group counseling for parents and siblings of 
the retarded child. Coordination with school involves consulta- 
tion with school personnel and assistance at Core Evaluations. 
Assistance in obtaining respite care as well as arrangements for 
a supervised recreation program during school vacations are also 
available. Requests for this service should be made to Mrs. Domar 
at 369-1113. 

Early Childhood Intervention Program : 
Minute Man Association for Retarded Citizens 
Community Agencies Building, Concord 
Susan Hartz, Social Worker, 369-3524 
Mary Swoomey, Developmental Teacher 
Carol Craig, Developmental Teacher 

This program is intended to identify and work with children 
from birth to three years of age who demonstrate developmental 
delays, lags, or disabilities. The program includes 2 Develop- 
mental Teachers and Social Worker as well as pertinent consultants. 
Weekly visits are made to the child's home by the home teacher in 
order to provide a program of developmental stimulation for that 
particular child, and involving parents in planning and carrying 
out the program. The purpose of stimulation is to maximize the 
developmental potential of the child. Guidance and support to 
the family are provided by the Social Worker in a variety of ways 
including: by-weekly parents group, individual and family counsel- 
ing, and assistance in obtaining other necessary services. Assist- 
ance and advocacy for Core Evaluations, monthly parents meetings 
for parents of Downes Syndrome children (all ages), and a weekly 
child/mother play group are also included in the program. Re- 
quests for services should be made to Sue Hartz at 369-3524. 

Behavior Shaping Program : 

Eliot Clinic 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

Carola Domar, Administrator of Retardation Services, 369-1113. 

The Behavior Shaping Program provides psychological services 
to mentally retarded individuals (children and adults) who are 
experiencing severe behavioral difficulties. A team of profes- 
sionals trained in Special Education and Behavioral Psychology 
provide each client with an individual assessment, and design and 
implement a Behavior Shaping Program for specific problems which 
interfere with an individual's family life and preclude or limit 
participation in education and or training programs. The program 
involves active participation of the significant people in a 



115 



client's life including parents, teachers and program staff and is 
carried out in the home and school or work setting. The team also 
provides training in areas dealing with retarded individuals and is 
available to parents, teachers, interested groups, community agen- 
cies, and Mental Health and Retardation Program staff. Referrals 
should be made to Carola Domar at 369-1113. 

Respite Care Program : 

Minute Man Association for Retarded Citizens 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

Edie Fruscione, Executive Director, 369-3524. 

The Minute Man Respite Care Program provides substitute in- 
home care to families with a retarded family member. Service is on 
an hourly and/or daily basis with each family eligible for up to 
$150.00 worth of care within a year. Families may use people of 
their own choosing or receive the names of qualified individuals 
from area social worker. Requests should be made to Carola Domar, 
John Noyes, Edie Fruscione, or Sue Hartz. 



Respite Care Program : 

Concord Family Service 

Community Agencies Building, Concord 

Rita Williams, Executive Director, 369-4909. 

This program provides emergency short term foster placement 
for retarded individuals who must be cared for out of the home due 
to a family emergency or crisis. Foster families are recruited, 
trained, and supervised by the Social Work staff of the agency. In 
addition, homemaker services can also be arranged to assist a re- 
tarded individual and his family in homemaking on a short term 
basis. Requests may be made directly to Concord Family Service 
or through John Noyes, Carola Domar, or Sue Hartz. 

Educational Services for Children 3-22 : 

Education services for school age children should be arranged 
by contacting your town's Director of Special Education. 

Rehabilitation Services : 

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission 

336 Baker Avenue, Concord - 369-1963 

The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission is a state agency 
responsible for assisting handicapped or disabled individuals to 
obtain employment training and job placement. Requests for service 
should be made to Mr. Quebec at 369-1963. 



116 



THE COUNCIL ON AGING 

Abigail Avery 
Charlotte Barnaby 
Clifford Bowles 
Margaret Kirkpatrick 
Claire Pearmain 
Esther Shapiro 
Enid Winchell 

Harry Healey, Treasurer 
Beverly Eckhardt, Secretary 
Alan McClennen, Vice Chairman 
Louise Meeks, Chairman 



This is the second annual report of the Council on Aging, which 
was voted into existence at the March 1976 Town Meeting. The 
Council is concerned with the quality of life of Lincoln residents 
as they age. It is an advocate for the continuing well being of 
older persons and has responsibility for coordinating and carrying 
out programs to meet their needs. This year the Council worked 
to develop and refine what was begun the preceding year and to move 
toward new goals. As might be expected, there were a number of 
new undertakings. 

Tuesdays at Pierce House - One of the Council's first endea- 
vors, the Sixty-Plus Health Clinic , continued to meet on the third 
Tuesday morning of the month. Nurses from the Emerson Hospital 
Home Care Department provided preventive health services (review 
of health history, blood-pressure check, etc.). In a total of ten 
clinics 181 people were seen (59 male, 122 female), 18 of whom were 
new to the clinic. Twenty-four referrals were made. In order to 
provide sufficient time with each person without excessive waiting, 
two nurses were usually required. The fee for the services of 
each nurse during fiscal 1977-78 is $21.40 per hour, a 7% increase 
from the preceding year. This program is underwritten by the 
Pierce Fund. 

While refreshments and the opportunity for socialization have 
always been part of these mornings, last spring the Council intro- 
duced a series of programs following the clinic and social period. 
Residents of all ages were welcome. This well received addition 
has been the responsibility of Margaret Kirkpatrick. Programs in- 
cluded a presentation with slides about the Galapagos Islands by 
Abigail Avery, a talk on nutrition in America by Diana Abbott, a 
slide presentation about the Museum of Science by Barbara Warner, 



117 



and a demonstration on decorating with seed pods by Lila Buerger. 

Glaucoma Screening Clinic - In response to request from the 
community, the Council co-sponsored a Glaucoma Screening Clinic 
with the Board of Health in November. Don Carl Bienfang, M.D., 
ophthalmologist and Lincoln resident, and William Stason, M.D. of 
the Board of Health volunteered to conduct the clinic with the 
assistance of members of the Council. In a three-hour period the 
clinic screened over 90 residents. 

Social and Recreational Activities - Two day-trips and a 
series of social afternoons with cards and games were arranged 
this year by Clifford Bowles. In May a group traveled to the 
waterfront for a visit to the Aquarium. September saw another 
large group enjoy a free buffet lunch at the Hillcrest-Nims Res- 
taurant in Waltham, sponsored by the Mill Dam Club of Concord. 
This was followed by a guided tour of the Saugus Iron Works Museum. 
Bus transportation for both occasions was funded by the Recreation 
Committee. The card-and-game socials, introduced in October, drew 
a good response and continue to meet monthly. Claire Pearmain, 
hospitality coordinator, and Margaret Kirkpatrick assisted at these 
gatherings. Beverly Eckhardt arranged publicity for these and 
other Council activities. 

Transportation - The Council has continued to provide neces- 
sary transportation to Council functions and to medical appoint- 
ments. Doris Podsen, a Friend of the Council, remains in charge 
of this service. 

Wheel -A-Meal - A major new effort this year has been the 
Wheel -A-Meal program, planned and coordinated by Charlotte Barnaby 
and Enid Winchell. Service began in March after a contract was 
negotiated between the Council on Aging and the Concord Family 
Service Society. The latter serves as vendor of the traveling 
meal service out of Emerson Hospital. Under the provisions of 
the contract Lincoln has an allowance of up to five meals a day 
to be delivered by volunteers to people 59 years or over who are 
unable to provide nutritious meals for themselves. The charge 
to the recipient is $2.00 per day for one hot and one cold meal. 
An additional cost is met by state subsidy. There have been a 
total of six clients, three of whom have been receiving meals from 
four to eight months. The daily visits of the volunteers who 
deliver the meals, although brief, seem to have added an extra 
dimension to those who are homebound. 

Newsletter - The Council issued its first newsletter, 
Coming of Age in Lincoln , in May and the second in October. Con- 
tent includes events of interest, information about resources, 



118 



services, and activities. Eugenia Flint is editor, and Esther 
Shapiro publisher. 

Housing Survey - In October a questionnaire designed by Alan 
McClennen was sent to households of Lincoln residents aged sixty and 
older to survey housing needs and preferences. In addition, a sec- 
ond questionnaire was mailed to all residents to determine the 
wishes of non-resident, sixty-plus relatives who would move to Lin- 
coln if suitable housing were available. The findings were dis- 
cussed with the Selectmen and distributed to townspeople. Because 
planning for future housing is complex and involves more than dwell- 
ings for older persons alone, the Council recommended to the Select- 
men a Town Housing Committee for future study, planning, and possi- 
ble implementation. 

Sixty-Plus Identification Cards - Cards allowing discounts at 
several area businesses have been issued to a number of residents. 
Under the direction of Esther Shapiro the Council is exploring the 
possibility of extending the program. 

Information and Referral - The Council answers telephone in- 
quiries concerning the availability of resources and services for 
older persons. When the Council cannot provide the service or 
information desired, the caller is directed to an appropriate re- 
source. Follow-up is made in some cases to insure that the nec- 
essary contact has been established. 

Lincoln continues its affiliation with Minuteman Home Care 
Corporation (MMHCC) , a regional agency under the state Department 
of Elder Affairs. This organization provides homemaker and chore 
services, nutritional programs, and information and referral. 
Abigail Avery continues as Lincoln's representative on the Board 
of MMHCC, with Alice Garrison as alternate. 

The Council wants to thank its volunteers who have given gen- 
erously of their time and energy during the year. We regret the 
decision of Beverly Smith to resign from the Council, but welcome 
her offer to serve as a Friend of the Council. We invite residents 
of all ages to share their thoughts about how the Council's work 
could be more effective, and we welcome participation. 



119 



DOG OFFICER 

Laura C. Perry 

The following is a report of my activities as Dog Officer from 
October 1976 through December 1977. 

The 2,844 calls consist of dogs lost, found, stray, problems 
at schools, complaints, neighborhood problems, chasing and killing 
livestock, hit by cars, packs of dogs, information, adoption, and 
problems with skunks, racoons, horses, pigs, etc. A daily kept 
record system which I have established has helped find solutions 
for all the different kinds of problems. 

There have been improvements made in the pound to make life 
in the kennel a little more comfortable and healthier for the dogs. 
A new ceiling and improved ventilation were installed. 

The problem at the Lincoln Schools with dogs has improved but 
has to be kept after continually. 

The established communication with Dog Officers of neighbor- 
ing towns has helped in the effort to match lost and found dogs 
with their owners. The Buddy Dog Humane Society in Sudbury has 
been a great help in placing 25 of my stray dogs in good homes. 

I would like to take this opportunity to remind all dog owners 
that your dog must be licensed and that the tag must be on the dog. 
The most important reason for the tag is that, in the event that 
your dog is lost or injured, you can be notified immediately and 
perhaps save its' life. 

Statistics on Activities of Dog Officer 
October 1976 through December 1977 

Mileage 4,592 miles 
Phone 237 hours 

No. of phone calls 2,844 calls 
Worked on records 160 hours 

Pound, walk, clean, feed dogs 1 hour per day 

Estimated work per week 35 hours 

Phone calls between 10 p.m. -7 a.m. 70 calls 

Dog bites 17 bites 

Fines and board $800.00 

Dogs in pound 150 dogs 



120 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Laura C. Perry 

Care of animals is governed by the Department of Food and 
Agriculture, Division of Animal Health of the Commonwealth. Each 
year the animal inspector supplies the Commonwealth with a list of 
animal owners and the numbers, kinds and states of health of the 
animals at the various locations in Lincoln. 

Dog bites are also the responsibility of the animal inspector. 
When someone is bitten by a dog, the dog is quarantined for 10 days, 
observed for signs of rabies and if found healthy, released. 



Estimated 


number 


of barns 


75 


Horses 






70 


Ponies 






51 


Pigs 






103 


Cows 






12 


Goats 






8 


Sheep 






59 


Donkeys 






4 


Mules 






1 


Dog bites 






17 


Racoon bites 




1 



121 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

James D. Birkett 

Robert C. Brannen 

Ann P. Brown 

John R. Caswell 

David M. Donaldson, Chairman 



Neighborhood Land Program and The Land Use Conference 

The Neighborhood Land Program, funded at the March, 1977, Town 
Meeting, was the major effort of the Planning Board for the year. 
The Program involved over 500 residents from eight different neigh- 
borhoods in living-room discussions centering around the recreation- 
al, visual and aesthetic needs of each neighborhood in an effort to 
identify and evaluate undeveloped lands for their value to the im- 
mediate neighborhood. The Neighborhood Land Program was run in co- 
operation with the Conservation Commission's program, and the re- 
sults of both programs were the focus of the November Land Use Con- 
ference. Reports of the eight chairmen, results of the Open Space 
Program and the November Land Use Conference have provided a wealth 
of data for evaluating specific development proposals, revising the 
Zoning By-Law, and developing long-range plans. While there has 
been only one neighborhood purchase of land to date, neighborhood 
discussions are continuing, and the program actively, and in many 
cases successfully, encouraged landowners to consider the benefits 
of conservation and agricultural restrictions. 

One general conclusion resulting from the efforts of the past 
year is that the town is interested in some outright purchases of 
conservation land, but that we should work creatively with develop- 
ers and owners through cluster development and R-3 zones to preserve 
watershed and trail connectors at minimum cost to the town. There 
is considerable interest in finding ways for more diverse population 
in town, but little enthusiasm for another large development. 

Mapping 

Our office took on the appearance of a "War Room" with differ- 
ent scale maps on all walls showing developed and undeveloped land, 



122 



land of conservation interest, land likely to be protected by the 
present owner, and land likely to be sold. 

Route 2 



After attending the initial Neighborhood 8 meeting in North 
Lincoln, the Board urged the Selectmen to pressure the State for 
some conclusion on Route 2 relocation. The resultant decision to 
make safety improvements on the present road has left Minute Man 
Regional High School without a much needed second access road and 
does little to unify the town. It also confuses the future of 
Route 2A within the Minute Man National Park. 

The South Lincoln Business Area 

It is perhaps a significant indicator of the fortunes of the 
new shopping center that during its first year of operation the 
focus has shifted from the limitations of our sign by-law to poor 
traffic circulation. There is still a need for a more flexible 
sign by-law, but the professional consultants needed to help us cre- 
ate such a law were expensive; inasmuch as the Merchants' Association 
did not wish to assume part of the expense, the matter has been 
dropped for the time being. We have sought professional advice on 
the traffic problems but have yet to work out a viable solution. 

Funding for a westbound platform at the commuter parking area 
was approved at the June Town Meeting ($6,200), and the work was 
mostly completed by the Lincoln D. P. W. in the late fall. The MBTA 
is responsible for moving the eastbound train stop further east in 
order to clear Lincoln Road for through traffic, but has consistently 
postponed this work in spite of frequent reminders on the part of the 
town. 

Lewis Street and the B-2 District continue to be a headache for 
the Selectmen, the Planning Board, the Board of Appeals and the 
Building Inspector. Some time soon we must resolve the zoning issues 
eliminate the fire hazards, condemn or have improved unsound struct- 
ures, and see that new construction meets building code standards. 
We agree with the Selectmen that the town should be asked to acquire 
the street in fee at the March, 1978, Town Meeting, so that improve- 
ments can be made and property lines clearly defined. 

Subdivisions 



(1) J. Q. Adams . A cluster subdivision of the existing house 
lot was approved creating separate lots for four existing 
inhabited buildings and one cellar hole. Five acres were 



123 



put into conservation open space in the cluster, and an 
additional 30-acre parcel is being held as agricultural 
land. 

(2) Connolly . The Board tentatively approved an access 
road across from Hiddenwood Path, which will require a 
wetlands hearing. At year end there had been no re- 
quest for the hearing and a preliminary plan has not been 
filed, though it is understood Mr. Connolly is still con- 
sidering a cluster subdivision. 

(3) Osborne-Phili p De No rmandie . Poor percolation tests re- 
sulted in only six house sites on this 18-acre tract. 
Neighbors, wishing to preserve the open fields, worked 
diligently with Mr. DeNormandie to develop a six-lot clus- 
ter plan and have purchased five lots with road frontage. 
They then deeded two of them and 8.4 acres of open land to 
the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust. The Board hopes 
there will be an adequate public trail connector. 

(4) Farrar Pond Village . Though plans were approved in 1972, 
there were several requests for changes as phases 2 and 3 
were built, including new parking spaces at the tennis 
court and a guard house. We have asked for traffic stud- 
ies to determine how the impact of this development com- 
pares with that forecast in 1972. 

(5) Humez . A plan for development of this 41-acre parcel 
was presented to an informal public hearing attended by 
some thirty neighbors in May, showing eight lots with 
frontage on existing roads, three lots served by a minor 
street subdivision off Blueberry Lane, and some open space 
Abutters objected to the minor street on the grounds that 
there was not a sufficient legal connection between Blue- 
berry Lane and the minor street. As a result, this plan 
was shelved, and in September the Board was presented with 
a plan not requiring subdivision approval showing 14 lots, 
all with road frontage, and no significant public open 
space. 

(6) Old County Realty Trust . Within a month after the de- 
finitive plan for this 48-acre parcel was presented at a 
public hearing, Polaroid began constructing a large build- 
ing in Waltham within 140 feet of the Old County property 
line. The Planning Board expressed its dismay at the 
lack of communication among Polaroid, the City of Waltham 
and the abutters of the property, and worked with inter- 



124 



ested parties to resolve the problem. The plan was then 
redesigned to use some of the 25 acres of open space as 
a buffer between the house lots and the loading platform. 
Polaroid has recently agreed to pay for a strip of this 
land, because their building has had an adverse effect 
on this property. 

(7) Warner . The June Town Meeting voted to acquire this en- 
tire property, and the subdivision request was subsequent- 
ly withdrawn. 

(8) Winchell . Spaulding and Slye propose to develop this 
88-acre parcel adjacent to Farrar Pond Village. The 
Town Meeting may be asked to rezone this property R-3, 
providing for a condominium concept on 30% of the land. 
The Board has suggested a bonus for some moderate income 
units, but this has been rejected by the developer as 
economically unfeasible. Our major concerns are the im- 
pact of increased traffic on the neighborhood and the con- 
centration of higher density housing in limited areas. 



In addition to subdivisions already before the Board, the fol- 
lowing parcels may come before us for approval: Umbrello, portions 
of Sandy Pond Trust land, and Flint land north of Lexington Road. 

Subdivision Approval Not Required 

In cases where lots to be created have the necessary legal front- 
age on existing roads, the Planning Board has no control over the 
division of the land other than to certify on the plan that it does 
not constitute a subdivision. The following have been considered 
under this category: 

(1) Bergen . 13.69 acres were put into a permanent conserva- 
tion restriction for the town. 

(2) Culver . 9.7 acres were separated from the house lot and 
placed under a permanent conservation restriction for the 
town. An additional 10.3 acres were given to the Lin- 
coln Land Conservation Trust. 

(3) Doherty . A separate lot was created with frontage on 
Tower Road. 

(4) Foley. A legally existing non- conforming lot off Mill 



125 



Street, which will not be further subdivided. 

(5) Pertzoff . One lot was created for the existing house 
and barn, with one additional lot, and the rest in open 
space. 

(6) Rural Land Foundation (former Banks property) . A 3-lot 
plan of land on Bedford Road. 

(7) Snider . A sketch of a 5-lot division of this land, with 
all lots having frontage on existing roads, was presen- 
ted, but we considered it a poor land use plan. How- 
ever, inasmuch as the plan does not constitute a sub- 
division, we have no control over the division of the 
lots. 

Bicycle Paths 

The Board regrets that the Trapelo Road bike path, for which 
$30,000 was voted in March, 1976, has not been constructed and is 
insisting that the D. P. W. get the work done this spring. We are 
considering subcontracting the path which will be proposed for Sandy 
Pond Road. The Bicycle Path Committee has applied for 75% funding 
for a proposed path along Route 126 from Route 117 to Baker Bridge 
Road. Path maintenance has not been good, and the D. P. W. needs 
an increased budget to keep our miles of path in top condition. The 
six-member Bicycle Path Committee is now being appointed to stag- 
gered 3-year terms. 

Long Range Plans 

Because day-to-day problems take up so much of our time, we in- 
tend to appoint a five-member permanent subcommittee of the Planning 
Board to develop an ongoing series of long range plans for the use of 
Lincoln's undeveloped lands. It is our hope that this committee 
will sustain the valuable momentum generated during the past year by 
the Neighborhood Lot Program, the Open Space Program and the Land Use 
Conference. It will be the task of this group to evaluate and bal- 
ance the plans and ideas of other town boards and special interest 
groups in an attempt to develop long range plans which are reasonably 
acceptable to all. 

Revision of the Zoning By-Law 

A final major project for this year is a complete revision of 
our zoning by-law and a new version of the zoning map. The revision, 
which we will bring before the Town at the Annual Meeting in March, 



126 



1978, is intended to bring the by-law into conformance with the new 
Zoning Act of the Commonwealth, take advantage of the increased flex- 
ibility which that Act permits, reorganize the by-law in order to 
make it easier to work with, and make changes which, we hope, will 
solve several problems which have occurred during past years. The 
revised by-law is not the last word, but we believe that, if adopted, 
it will be a major step forward. 









BOARD OF APPEALS 

Barbara Barker 
Robert W. Jevon 
David F. Sykes 
Hans L. van Leer 
Peter Meenan, Chairman 

D'Arcy MacMahon, Associate Member 
Jane Cooper Williams, Associate Member 



In reviewing the activities of this Board during 1977, we were 
unable to identify any particular event which is deserving of special 
mention or attention, except possibly for acknowledging the improved 
cooperation and assistance provided by other Town Boards in connect- 
ion with our consideration of applications for variances for special 
permits. Thus, we are happy to report that, for this Board, 1977 
represented a year of smooth operations in the conduct of our busi- 
ness. 

Nineteen applications were submitted for our considerations and 
10 public hearings were held. The petitioners' requests were grant- 
ed in 13 cases and denied in three. One application was withdrawn 
after the public hearing, one scheduled hearing was cancelled and 
another involved a re-hearing of an earlier application. Requests 
for special permits or modifications of special permits were involved 



127 



in 15 of the applications; the balance was for variances. Three 
applications involved cluster developments. 

Since the Town's Zoning By-Laws must be amended before June 30, 
1978 to conform with the recently adopted Zoning Act, we expect that 
during the early months of 1978, a significant portion of the Plan- 
ning Board's attention will be directed toward preparing By-Law 
revisions to be presented for consideration at the March Town Meet- 
ing. The Zoning Act, which became effective in Massachusetts on 
January 1, 1976, reflects an important shift in the underlying 
thrust of zoning regulation. No longer is the emphasis on matters 
which justify control solely based on a community's so-called "pol- 
ice power" (such as lessening dangers from fire and congestion) ; 
instead the focus of the law is on the use of zoning as a tool for 
overall land use planning. 

As a practical matter, this Board has always viewed its func- 
tion as principally one of providing support to the land use plan- 
ning objectives of the Town. We believe that the added flexibility 
permitted, as well as required, by the Zoning Act, though resulting 
in changes which are primarily procedural in nature, will serve to 
complement and enhance our efforts in this regard and will enable 
Lincoln to maintain its traditional excellence in planning for the 
use of its land prospectively and with foresight. 



123 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

John Quincy Adams 
Lydia H. Dane 
James DeNormandie 
William M. Preston 
Kemon P. Taschioglou 
Frederick B. Taylor 
Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 

1977 was a transition year for the Conservation Commission. 
While the scope of our activity broadened considerably, we saw the 
emphasis of our work shift - from the planning of open space to the 
implementation of programs to protect it. During the year, five 
notable events occurred which together significantly affected the 
implementation programs. Throughout our normal activities in land 
protection, land management, and land improvement, we welcomed an 
increasing involvement by townspeople. 

The shift in the emphasis of our work was the result primarily 
of two major study tasks. The first one culminated years of de- 
tailed planning with the publication of the 65-page booklet, 
An Open Space Plan for the Town of Lincoln... to protect our natural 
systems , which had been heralded by its companion-piece map published 
in 1976. The plan identifies 1400 of Lincoln's 3800 undeveloped 
acres as "lands of conservation interest" and sets forth an imple- 
mentation program for their protection. To brief the townspeople 
on this report, the Commission joined the Planning Board to partici- 
pate in its eight evening organizational meetings for the Neighbor- 
hood Land Program held in private homes throughout the Town. 

Broadly endorsed in principle at the Special Town Meeting in 
June, this plan was well received by state and Federal officials, 
thereby qualifying Lincoln for participation in Commonwealth and 
Federal open- space funding programs through 1982 (if and when funds 
become available, see below). 

At that same June meeting, funds were appropriated, and the 
Commission was authorized to integrate the early stage of its open- 
space implementation program with the Neighborhood Land Program of 
the Planning Board. Named the Open Space Program, this was the 
second study task. Professionally managed, its objective was to 
provide a detailed study of the status of the lands of conservation 
interest, their land use possibilities, and the intentions of their 
respective owners. 



129 



Operating through the extensive volunteer citizen's organiza- 
tion, the program manager arranged visits and discussions with every 
landowner. Many townspeople thereby gained great understanding of 
the intricacies and the possibilities of implementing open space 
plans, and a valuable dossier of each land parcel was produced for 
the Commission's future use. All the effort culminated in the 
November publication of the composite report, Undeveloped Land in 
Lincoln , covering both the Neighborhood Land Program and the Open 
Space Program. The report served as valuable background data for 
the Land Use Conference conducted later that same month. 

The five notable events mentioned above resulted in the mitiga- 
tion of those pressures for extensive land acquisition which had 
arisen from the promise for 100% valuation of open space to come 
in 1978. These included the following: 

1. State officials informed the Town that, for the foresee- 
able future, Lincoln was unlikely to receive any more state 
or Federal funding to aid in its open space land acquisi- 
tion program. On the one hand, the end of funding may 
limit the total land the Town can afford to buy. On the 
other hand, the news reduced the marketability of lands 
whose owners wished to see continue to exist as open 
space. It also provided further impetus both to owners 
and to the Town to seek other ways of protecting open space, 

2. At about the same time, Commonwealth requirements for 
on-site septic systems were made more stringent, thereby 
reducing possibilities for residential development on sig- 
nificant portions of lands of conservation interest. 
While the Commission welcomes this respite from pressures 
to protect some of the lands, it does not view this re- 
striction as any long-term assurance that lands will remain 
open. What the State Legislature giveth, it can also 
taketh away. Furthermore, the restriction does not affect 
developments with sewage treatment or piped sewage systems. 

3. The Commonwealth enacted a pilot program for the purchase 
of development rights from owners of farmland. This 
provides further backup for protecting farmland to the 
existing farmland assessment program, wherein land is 
assessed on the basis of its agricultural value instead 
of its development potential. 

4. Two studies - one, an overlay of the soils conservation 
maps of the Department of Agriculture with the Open Space 



130 



Plan map, the other, a lot-by-lot analysis performed by the 
Neighborhood Land and Open Space Programs - showed that 
wetland and other house-lot restrictions significantly 
lowered the developmental possibilities of many lands of 
conservation interest. 

5. The Board of Assessors announced in November that the 
spirit of determining full market value of Lincoln land 
would be guided by consideration of all the market data 
that a buyer would consider in arriving at a purchase price, 
as opposed to a more mechanized approach which would assess 
lands as if they provided their full developmental poten- 
tail at the time of assessing. This announcement indicat- 
ed that the assessed value of some of the most important 
lands of conservation interest would not be as high as 
originally feared. 

Open Space Protection 

Activity relating directly to the process of protection of 
open space in 1977 demonstrated Town response to efforts described 
above for increased neighborhood and individual involvement. Two 
major land areas were proposed and approved for acquisition by the 
Town. 

The first acquisition from the Henrietta Warner Estate com- 
prised 49+ acres of field, swamp and woodland lying westerly and 
northerly of Mackintosh Lane. This parcel was acquired in a com- 
plex package made possible by cash gifts from Warner neighbors, 
by gifts of approximately 20 acres of land in conservation restric- 
tions from the Bergens and Culvers, and another 10 acres of land 
by outright gift from the Culvers. The acquisition resulted in 
the protection of open fields, trail access from South Lincoln to 
the school complex and lands to the north, and provided future 
insurance for the protection of the Town water-supply well to the 
south. 

Neighbors also supported the Town in the other land acquisi- 
tion for 1977. Roger Barzun, William Rand, Jr., and the Old Town 
Hall Corporation joined the Town in agreeing to purchase various 
parts of the seven-acre parcel owned by Phillips Academy. These 
combined purchases provided open space integrity to the open field 
between Sandy Pond Road and Lincoln Road at Lincoln Center. 

The Commission was pleased to see a total of forty Conservation 
Restrictions, comprising 206± acres, given and approved in 1977 - 



131 



the first year of active implementation of this instrument by indi- 
vidual citizens of the Town. The gifts resulted in the protection 
of a number of neighborhood acres. The Lincoln Land Conservation 
Trust received twenty-two of the restrictions comprising 96+ acres, 
with the remaining eighteen restrictions going to the Town. The 
proportions in acreage between permanent and temporary restrictions 
were about equal . 

Through the cooperation of the owners, thirteen private farms, 
comprising 327+ acres were placed under the farmland assessment 
program, thereby extending further the protection of agricultural 
areas. 

During the year, negotiations with owners and intensive work 
began to develop plans for protection of two of the largest and 
most visible parcels of designated lands of conservation interest: 

1) the Sandy Pond Trust properties comprising five parcels and 
approximately 250 acres abutting Sandy Pond and adjacent areas; and 

2) the Umbrello property comprising some 47 acres lying north of 
South Great Road and west of Tower Road. In cooperation with the 
landowners, the Commission provided extensive test pitting to deter- 
mine possibilities for development. The Commission subsequently 
sought professional appraisal help to establish market values. 
Planning and negotiations for the lands continues into 1978, and 

we expect to present a program for protection implementation to 
the Town for these parcels. The Commission is grateful to the 
owners of these properties for their continuing cooperation with 
the Town and their expressed desire to serve the interests of the 
Town as much as possible. 

In an innovative arrangement of neighbors, volunteer planning 
help and legal expertise, the Commission participated in a private 
program to protect 17 acres of fields and woodland in the 34+ acre 
property, formerly owned by Gordon Osborne, lying north of Trapelo 
Road and along Page Road. Through considerable volunteer creative 
effort, a plan was developed which provided for development of five 
residential lots while protecting open fields for grazing and farm- 
ing, and open space links for neighbors and passersby. Perhaps 
this activity establishes a model for future private land-protection 
programs in which the Conservation Commission serves primarily as 
a conveenor of interested parties and assures consideration of 
available planning tools. 

The Commission conducted eight wetlands hearings during 1977, 
one of which was on our own project for a canoe landing and path 
on the Sudbury River from the north side of Route 117 near Lee's 
Bridge. Two projects were later abandoned, but four which the 



132 



Commission approved were delightful, planned ponds on private pro- 
perties. 

Work continued on the preparation of a project description and 
proposal for extra Town funding of a research study toward protec- 
tion of Lincoln's drinking water supply. Co-sponsored by the 
Water Commissioners, this work is involving many hours of data 
gathering efforts. 

Land Improvement 

Three significant land improvement programs were conducted on 
conservation lands - on the Browning Fields, on Pine Hill and on 
the Mt. Misery land on the banks of the Sudbury River near Lee's 
Bridge. 

The drainage system on the Browning Fields initiated in 1976 
was completed permitting the lower fields to be properly mowed and 
to produce a larger amount of hay. This work restored the drain- 
age system established many years ago by the late George Browning. 
During construction, we found another indication of increasing 
neighborhood involvement in our activities on a sign left by an 
anonymous Lincoln bard: 

"They who dredged this brook with disgrace, 
Have spoiled the beauty of this place. 
May indigestion rack their chest, 
And ants invade their pants and vest!" 

On Pine Hill, extensive tree and trail work is being accom- 
plished. Undesirable brush and small trees are being cleared over 
a wide area to permit tree growth heretofore restricted and to re- 
duce hazards which resulted in numerous small fires over the past 
several decades. Existing trails are being altered to provide 
gently ascending, winding paths to the summit. These will be 
particularly attractive to cross-country skiers, and they will 
help relieve the skier load on the Mt. Misery lands. Permission 
was obtained from the State Forest and Park Division to use the 
parking lot at the old restaurant site on the Walden Pond Reserva- 
tion for the winter months. Work on this project is performed 
by six persons furnished under Title VI of the CETA program and 
is managed by Russell Barnes, our Conservation Naturalist. 

As mentioned before under the paragraph on wetlands hearings, 
the Commission has constructed a small parking area on the north 
side of Route 117 near Lee's Bridge. This area also serves as a 
turn-around for school buses. Previously the buses had to drive 



133 



several miles into Concord before they could turn back to Lincoln. 
With the advent of spring, work will begin on a canoe landing on 
the Sudbury River leading from this parking lot, and also on a 
trail adjacent to but removed from Route 126, leading back to 
Mount Misery. 

Land Management 

The Commission's land management program primarily comprises 
two kinds of activities: the leasing of farmland and the mainten- 
ance activities of Russell Barnes assisted by Michael Murphy. 

This past year the Commission has leased approximately 115 
acres of land for agricultural and nursery production and hopes 
to increase this area in the coming year. Pathways through leased 
lands have been reserved to provide convenient access for pedes- 
trians . 

Building on the successful initiation of the Ranger Program 
in 1976, Russell Barnes managed a group of three young men - 
David Carley, Lee Nelson and Don Seymour - to serve as rangers 
during the summer months from mid-May to Labor Day. Their patrol- 
ling activities concentrated on the Sandy Pond and Mt. Misery 
areas to prevent swimming in the ponds. With procedures now es- 
tablished and with public awareness that Lincoln lands are pa- 
trolled by rangers, Russell Barnes expects to be able to reduce 
the number of rangers to two men in 1978 without any loss or de- 
gradation in coverage. 

As usual, the Commission through the efforts of Russell 
Barnes, maintained the ice and kept clear of snow for skaters 
the lower pond on Mt. Misery during the winter months. 

Extensive tree damage occurring during the May 9th snowstorm 
required a month's work of trail clearing and tree trimming. As 
a byproduct of the work on trails and forest improvement and 
maintenance, about 60 cords of firewood were produced and sold to 
townspeople in 1977. Funds from these sales are credited to the 
Commission's agency account which is applied toward continuing 
management of conservation lands. One such application in 1977 
was the purchase of a log splitter to aid in the on-going tree 
maintenance efforts. 

Appraisals 

The studies and negotiations relating to the Sandy Pond Trust 
and Umbrello properties required the contracting of extensive 



134 



professional services for froth test-pitting and appraisals. The 
unexpected requests from both owners to begin negotiations in the 
same year resulted in unexpected expenditures. While most of the 
work is completed on these two properties, the Commission foresees 
the necessity for continuing such expenditures as its implementation 
program for land protection continues to involve extensive parcels 
of land. 

We view this continuing contractual activity as necessary and 
valuable to protect both the landowner and the Town, and to ensure 
that maximum potential for creative land use be realized. We are 
sharpening our procedures in this regard, and look forward to future 
reports to Town officials and townspeople as opportunities arise. 

Personnel Changes 

The Commission accepted with regret the resignation of Commis- 
sion member Ronald H. Marcks who provided needed legal counsel and 
a quiet wisdom to our proceedings, and it welcomed the appointment 
of Fred Taylor whose many years of experience and knowledge in Town 
business make him a valuable addition. 

Our Thanks 



We extend to the following persons and groups our thanks for 
their support and their help in making our programs successful: 

To Warren F. Flint for continuing day-to-day guidance and 
management of many of our activities. 

To Roberta M. Page, not only for services as secretary to the 
Commission, but also for her creativity, her insight, and her humor. 

To Ann Brown, William Rand, and William Constable for their 
creative efforts and time that went well beyond the scope of their 
professional commitments to produce the Open Space Program. 

To Warren Fiske Flint, Jr., for repeated contributions in land 
studies, layouts, and creative drawings, and to both him and his 
wife Penny for their monumental efforts in producing the Open Space 
Plan booklet. 

To Kevin Wright for his delicate artistry in producing the cover 
and interior drawings depicting Lincoln scenes in the Open Space Plan 
booklet. 






135 



To Russell Barnes for performing his work as Tree Warden and 
Conservation Naturalist seven days and nights a week and for his 
continuing heartfelt concern to protect our resources. 

To Leona G. Champeny and Vivian Meyer for their unrelenting, 
innovative efforts on the water study proposal. 

To the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust for their $2,000 contri- 
bution that made possible the publication of the Open Space Plan 
booklet. 

To the State Forest and Park Division of the Department of 
Environmental Management and to Mr. Joseph Lennox, Superintendent of 
the Walden Pond Reservation, for granting parking privileges to 
cross-country skiers using the new trails on Pine Hill. 

To Richard P. Carroll and the forces of the Public Works Depart- 
ment for the help in maintaining our lands and lending us tools, ve- 
hicles, and brawn to help us get our work done. 

To Chief D. James Arena and members of the Fire and Police 
Departments for stretching their ranks thin to help us in the polic- 
ing of our lands, in the protection of people on them, and in the 
saving of the lands themselves. 

To Elizabeth J. Snelling and others at the Town Hall for their 
daily assistance and cooperation. 

To Douglas Burckett for the painstaking lot-by- lot analysis 
which added significantly to the "Undeveloped Land in Lincoln" report 
and to our knowledge of land use possibilities. 



136 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Roger M. Barzun 

Susan M. Brooks 

William G. Constable 

William A. King 

Margaret B. Marsh 

Carol H. Meyer 

William M. Preston, Chairman 

Ruth W. Wales 



The Land Trust acquired four new parcels of land during 1977: 

From John Quincy and Lucy Dodge Adams, 3.91 acres near Baker 
Bridge, across the B & M tracks from the Walden Pond Reservation. 

From Perry J. and Kate S. Culver, 10.3 acres of meadow and 
forest land between the Smith School and the former Warner property 
recently purchased by the Town. This secures another important 
link in the "pipeline trail" between Lincoln Woods and the schools. 

From William and Aire-Maija Schwann, 3.76 acres in the elbow 
bend of Old Winter Street, a bit of old meadow and cattail swamp to 
be preserved as a wildlife sanctuary. 

As the consequence of the collaboration between abuttors and 
other neighbors with the owner, Gordon Osborne, and the developer, 
Philip DeNormandie, 18.9 acres in the corner of Trapelo and Page 
Roads will be developed as a cluster. There will be no more than 
4 houses located on lots totalling 6.2 acres. Of the remainder, 
mostly open pasture, 10.8 acres has already been acquired by the 
Trust with the expectation that the balance, 1.9 acres, will be given 
to it later. A trail connection has thus been acquired between the 
Trust property off Page Farm Road and Trapelo Road. 

There has been unprecedented activity in the relatively new 
field of conservation restrictions during the year. No fewer than 
11 restrictions were donated to the Land Trust, covering a total of 
just over 70 acres; 3 were for terms of 30 years, the remainder were 
permanent . 

Richard Newbold was employed for ten weeks this fall to work on 
trails. Although hampered by bad weather, a great deal was accom- 
plished in clearing up the debris from the May snow storm. The 
30-odd miles of public trails in the Town have never been in better 



137 



shape. Two new trails were cut, in the former Warner property, now 
Town conservation land, which provide important connectors. 

A series of seven "Open Space Trail Walks" was conducted on 
weekends, commencing October 1st., to acquaint people with some of 
the major pieces of private land, presently on or soon to come on 
the market, whose protection the Conservation Commission considers 
to be important. The turn-out was excellent, with between 20 and 
30 hikers reporting each time, rain or shine. 

The Twentieth Annual Meeting of the Land Trust was held on 
May 16th, 1977, at which time trustees were elected to fill vacancies 
in both the Trust and its affiliated organization, the Rural Land 
Foundation. 

Treasurer's Report 



On hand January 1, 1977: 
Savings account balance 
Checking account balance 

Receipts: 

Dues and contributions 

Sales of trail maps, guides £ studies 

Interest on bank balances 

Special gifts 



Expenditures: 

Trail upkeep - labor § materials 
Trail maps & guides - printing 
Annual meeting notice - Printing $ 

postage 
"An Open Space Plan" -share of expense 
Insurance: General liability 

Workmen's compensation 
Social Security taxes 
Legal 

Filing fees £ miscellaneous 
Purchases of land 

On hand December 31, 1977: 
Savings account balance 
Checking account balance 



14,014.36 
2,449.19 



2,816.00 

900.80 

802.70 

105,016.93 



1,306.46 
312.60 

514.65 

2,315.95 

309.00 

151.00 

91.27 

266.80 

34.00 

110,000.00 



9,707.85 
990.40 



$ 16, 463.55 



109,536.43 
$125,999.98 



$115,301.73 



$ 10,698.25 



138 



LAND USE CONFERENCE 

Peter Adams 

Robert Allen 

Susan Brooks 

Ann Co burn 

Eleanor Fitzgerald 

Henry Morgan 

Leo Palmer 

Colin Smith 

Roger Taunton-Rigby 

Joan Kimball, Chairman 



Early in 1977, town officials decided that the time again had 
come to solicit citizen opinion on land use policy in Lincoln. The 
town was still at a point where it could make affirmative decisions 
rather than reactive motions, and while there was still time -- one 
third of the town is undeveloped and in private hands -- the town 
leaders wished to hear general directions from townspeople to help 
them in their long range planning. 

It was agreed that a day long conference would be the best 
vehicle to elicit opinion and, in order to have informed discussion, 
information should be sent to townspeople prior to the meeting. Con- 
sequently, the Selectmen appointed a committee of ten citizens and 
gave them the charge of creating a framework for the day and of de- 
termining what information should be sent to the town. At the June 
Town Meeting, the town voted to appropriate $2,000 for the conference 
and the mailing. It was understood that money for a final report 
would be voted at a fall Town Meeting. 

The steering committee decided that the conference should be 
primarily a day where citizens would be heard. The day was divided 
into two parts: the morning which dealt with growth, choices and 
social implications; and the afternoon session which dealt with the 
open space program, priorities for future acquisitions, and manage- 
ment of conservation land. Each session had citizen speakers (the 
morning speakers were Saville Davis, keynote speaker, and Henry 
Morgan who gave a demographic description of Lincoln's people; the 
afternoon speaker was R. Langdon Wales who spoke about the land and 
its values) . Each session broke up into twenty discussion groups -- 
each with a discussion leader, recorder and a set of questions. The 
format of each group was identical; differences occurred because of 
the participants. A questionnaire, prepared by the steering committee, 
was designed not only as a statistical means of identifying opinion, 



139 



but also as a way to draw the events of the day together and to clar- 
ify choices. The day was to begin and end with a slide show of 
Lincoln prepared by Roland Robbins and Judy Polumbaum. 

In the early fall the committee had asked Elizabeth Donaldson 
and a committee to plan and organize a day where citizens could be- 
come more familiar with the town. Tour Day , a day with bus tours, 
walking, biking and horseback riding tours, resulted on Saturday, 
October 22nd. Many citizens attended. In addition, Bill Preston, 
of the Conservation Commission and the Lincoln Land Conservation 
Trust, led walks over town lands throughout the fall. 

While they were planning the framework for the conference, the 
committee also researched and wrote the LAND USE CONFERENCE REPORT 
(a chapter on land banking was supplied by the League of Women Voters 
while one on industrial and commercial uses was prepared by John 
Caswell of the Planning Board). This report and UNDEVELOPED LAND IN 
LINCOLN, the report sponsored by the Planning Board and Conservation 
Commission, were sent to the town ten days before the conference. 
The Finance Committee also sent a report to the town before the con- 
ference. The steering committee invited citizens and groups to 
have written handouts at the conference since no one was to speak in 
the plenary sessions except for the invited speakers. 

On November 19, 465 people attended and participated in the 
Land Use Conference at Brooks School. Discussion was lively and 
informed. 348 questionnaires were returned. 

Lincoln author and editor Paul Brooks wrote the summary report 
of the Land Use Conference. Carefully studying the notes of almost 
forty recorders, and including the tabulations from the question- 
naire, Mr. Brooks wove together the threads of the day. This final 
report was sent to all townspeople on January 18, 1978. 

Thanks to the many citizens working to make the day a success • 
80 discussion leaders and recorders, registrars, food preparers 
(First Parish Pilgrim Fellowship and the Girl Scouts), babysitters 
(Episcopal Young Churchmen), questionnaire tabulators, many other 
volunteers, the steering committee and the many people who attended • 
town officials once again were able to create another unique oppor- 
tunity for citizens to have a voice in long range planning. 



140 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Frederick M. Tingley 
John Kimball, Clerk 
Stuart B, Avery, Chairman 



Our chairman, Alan McClennen, chose not to run for re-election 
this year. His organizational and planning abilities are very 
much missed. Mr. John Kimball was elected by the Town to fill this 
post. 

Frozen Pipes 

The unusually long cold winter froze many service pipes in 
Town leaving some customers without water. The Department arranged 
to thaw them by using various techniques. Owners of private lines 
were encouraged to improve their services to reduce the chances of 
refreezing in future years. Unless this is done, future thawing 
will be the responsibility of the owners. 

Inflation and increased capital costs necessitated by the 
construction projects of recent years forced us to increase water 
rates about 35% with the spring hilling. Inflation since the last 
rate increase accounted for 70% of this. At the same time, the 
rate structure was somewhat simplified for the ease of both the 
customer and the Town. After a base charge, dependent on the ser- 
vice size, all customers pay 65 cents per thousand gallons. It is 
expected that continuing inflation and improvements will force fur- 
ther rate increases next year and in following years. Some of 
these improvements are mandated by the state and Federal governments, 
and others demanded by our customers, but all will serve to supply 
safer and better tasting water.. 

Ground Water Study 

With Town Meeting appropriating funds from both the Conserva- 
tion and Water Commissions, Mrs. Leona Champeny has made a prelim- 
inary study of the geology and hydrology surrounding the Tower Road 
well. With this data she has prepared a proposal which will be 
submitted to other governmental agencies. One of the more inter- 
esting findings is an apparent continuing increase in the salt 
(sodium chloride) content of the ground and well water. It is 
strongly suspected that this was caused by the Highway Department's 
salt storage bin, but it is not known whether there is a continuing 
leak. 



141 



Main Construction 

There were two major pipe construction projects this year, on 
Concord and Old Concord Roads and on Page Road. The former re- 
placed 7,000 feet of old, small, rusted iron with a 10-inch lined 
cement asbestos pipe at a cost short of $123,000. This should 
rid the southwest corner of Town of a rusty water problem and sub- 
stantially increase the available fire flow throughout southwest 
Lincoln. Considerable difficulties were had with the prime con- 
tractor on this job, including unnecessary line breaks during con- 
struction, disregard for customers, safety, and property, and 
unnecessary delays. All of this made evident a lack in the abil- 
ity of the Department to properly manage complex technical projects. 

The second project was the installation of 2600 feet of 8-inch 
lined cement asbestos pipe on Page Road at a cost of about $36,000, 
a third of which was paid by a home owner and a developer. This 
completes the Page Road loop, thereby increasing the fire protection 
on Page, Lexington, Trapelo and other roads in the vicinity. 

Water Quality 

Lincoln's water continues to have spells of poor taste and 
smell. One source of trouble is the uncovered pressure reservoir 
off Bedford Road. Leaves, pine needles and algae from Sandy Pond 
get into it in the fall and decompose under the winter ice, giving 
the water the very poor taste. Some success was achieved last 
winter by drastically varying the water level in the reservoir to 
break up the ice and release the gases. In the fall the reservoir 
chlorination system, which has been operating for a number of sum- 
mers, was winterized. This fulfills a state mandate to provide 
a residual level of disinfectant leaving the reservoir and through 
disinfection and increased circulation reduces the decomposition 
and the resultant poor taste. It, unfortunately, sometimes pro- 
vides the residents of north Lincoln unpleasant levels of chlorine. 
With state urging, the Commissioners are making plans to cover the 
reservoir which will eliminate the necessity of chlorination at 
this point. A study of all the possible covering methods, and 
their finances, is underway, and a Town Meeting warrant article is 
expected. 

The prime source of poor taste is probably the algae in Sandy 
Pond, our prime source of water. The amount of algae varies from 
time to time and the Department is now switching from the pond to 
the well before the level gets high enough to cause objectional 



142 



taste. Unfortunately, the well has insufficient capacity to pro- 
vide the Town all the time. There was a major algae bloom in late 
spring of this year which necessitated treating Sandy Pond with 
copper sulfate, an algaecide. Customers have suggested that carp 
or other fish be introduced into Sandy Pond to feed on and reduce 
the algae. We have discussed this innovation with experts, and 
it unfortunately appears that it would require a research project 
beyond the mean^s of the Department. 

A number of new Federal and state regulations governing the 
operations of water departments and the quality of delivered water 
became effective in June. In addition to making six biological 
tests per month and yearly chemical tests, it is also now necessary 
to measure the turbidity of water daily from open sources such as 
Sandy Pond and report the results to the State Department of Envir- 
onmental Quality Engineering. If the turbidity exceeds one unit 
the supplier may be in violation of the law, and must notify its 
customers of the fact through mail, radio, newspapers, etc. 

Sandy Pond water slightly exceeds the maximum turbidity limit 
as defined by the state, but not as defined by the Federal govern- 
ment. The Department will perform additional monitoring to deter- 
mine if it complies with the regulations when it returns to Sandy 
Pond use. Excess turbidity is not of itself dangerous, but does 
indicate the possibility of ineffective disinfection due to the 
presence of the foreign particles. It is most likely that Sandy 
Pond's turbidity is caused by the algae. 

Additional Supply 

These considerations, and general trends in the water supply 
business, indicate that eventually Sandy Pond may require a filtra- 
tion plant. This promises to be extremely expensive. At this 
time a more reasonable solution to our supply problem seems to be 
the reduction of Sandy Pond to a standby and resource status and 
the drilling of a second well. A major increase in Lincoln's 
population may require a third well. Accordingly, at year's end 
the Department is testing for ground water supply at various points 
throughout the Town. These include areas south of Farrar Pond, 
south of Sandy Pond, and near the present Tower Road well. 



143 



STATISTICS FOR 1977 



Gallons pumped during 


the 


year: 


Sandy 
Tower 


Pond 
Road Well 

Total 


186,826,967 
55,237,700 

242,064,667 




Beginning of 


Year 


Added 


End of Year 


Miles of main 




40.97 




0.46 


41.43 


Hydrants in use 




358 




2 


360 


Gates in use 




470 




5 


475 


Blowoffs 




34 







34 


Services in use 




1348 




20 


1368 


Meters in use 




1316 




20 


1336 


Replaced hydrants 










19 


Repaired meters 










35 



The 1977 construction projects were: 

Page Road 2,427 feet 

Concord Road 4,079 feet 

Old Concord Road 2,734 feet 






144 



LINCOLN WATER QUALITY STUDY 
Leona G. Champeny 



The Lincoln Water Quality Study, proposed by the Water Com- 
missioners and the Conservation Commission, and voted into existence 
by the Town's citizens at the March 1977 Town Meeting, has achieved 
several of the objectives outlined last spring. 

(1) First, a considerable quantity of background data relat- 
ing to the two water sources, Sandy Pond and the Tower Road well, 
have been collected and analyzed. These include well exploratory 
studies from as early as the 1940s, preliminary file reports relat- 
ing to ground water potential, soil and bedrock information, studies 
concerning the effect of human activities on water quality, and some 
ten years of actual water quality records for both sources. 

(2) Second, several preliminary water quality investigations 
have been conducted in the water supply headwaters to establish the 
present "status quo" and to identify any potential problems. At the 
time of writing, a further round of testing is underway. 

(3) Third, a proposal describing the scope and approximate 
cost of a year-long study of the water quality problems of the well 
and pond has been drafted and reviewed by Town boards preparatory 
to seeking state and/or Federal funding. The proposed research 
study has the potential not only to solve Lincoln's water supply 
problems, but also should assist the region at large in achieving a 
greater degree of self-sufficiency regarding water needs. 



Of the $5,000 voted last year to fund this stbdy, about half 
has been expended on the collection of water samples and an outside 
professional laboratory analysis. The remainder is committed to 
chemical testing equipment and the installation of in-place monitor- 
ing stations. This accounting does not include the nearly 700 hours 
of volunteered professional time of several individuals, nor the in- 
valuable services of our CETA research assistant, Vivian Meyer, the 
equivalent of a $600 grant. 

Gratitude is extended to all Town boards and departments for 
their enthusiastic assistance and to the many private citizens who 
have offered local water quality information or access to sampling 
sites. Special thanks are owed to Roberta Page for typing innumera- 
ble technical drafts. 



145 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Superintendent 



General Maintenance of Ways and Parks 

Due to the massive damage inflicted on the Town by the May 9th 
snow storm, the major portion of the year was spent in the repair and 
removal of trees around the Town. In addition to this work the De- 
partment was able to accomplish the following projects plus the gen- 
eral maintenance work orders. 

1) Installation of drainage and the repair of a retaining wall 
on Lincoln Road at Pierce Park. 

2) Construction of a commuter platform near the Lincoln Mall. 

3) Installation of a drainage system on Baker Bridge Road 
between Granville Road and Baker Bridge fields. 

4) Construction of a parking lot and school bus turnaround on 
conservation land near Farrar Pond. 

5) Replacement of culvert on Page Road near Route 2. 

6) Resurfacing by sand sealing of Virginia Road, Bedford Road 
and Bedford Lane. 

7) Resurfacing by stone seal of Lexington Road, Baker Bridge 
Road and Winter Street. 



Equipment Maintenance 

All police, fire, public works and conservation equipment was 
maintained and kept operational as needed. 



Snow and Ice 

All public ways, parking areas and town properties were kept 
in as safe a condition as possible during the winter season. 



146. 



Sanitary Land Fill 

The operation of the sanitary land fill was performed by a 
private contractor, as in past years. 



Bike Paths 

Due to the problems in other areas, the Department was unable 
to participate in the construction of any additional bicycle paths. 
With the coming of a new construction season, we hope to be able to 
move ahead and recover the lost time. 



In closing I would like, as in past years, to thank all who 
have assisted or supported in the accomplishments of the Department 



TREE WARDEN 

Russell L. Barnes 



The May 9th storm dominated the year by disrupting both the 
spring and fall planting seasons. Damage to existing trees was 
extensive and the Town Hall common was particularly hard hit. 

This spring replacement maples will be planted along Baker 
Bridge Road. A tree nursery will be established in an effort to 
lower future planting costs. The first trees should be ready for 
harvest in the fall of 1979. 

The Tree Warden wishes to thank the Department of Public Works 
and the Conservation Commission for their cooperation and support. 



147 



TRANSFER STATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Michael Belanger 

Annette Rosen 

Henry Rugo 

Henry Harrison, Chairman 



This committee has been charged by the Selectmen with identify- 
ing and developing an alternative solid waste disposal program to 
the Town's sanitary landfill. The latter will remain approved for 
operation for the major part of 1978 under a plan on file with the 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineering (EQE) , 
but the EQE has informed the Town that it will allow neither any 
extensions to the current plan nor any new plans related to land- 
filling anywhere on the present site. 

What this means is that Lincoln is under some real pressure to 
approve appropriations at the 1978 Town Meeting for a different 
disposal program in order to have sufficient lead-time to effect an 
efficient change-over. Consequently, this committee will sponsor 
an article on the Warrant for this Town Meeting that seeks an appro- 
priation for the design and development of a transfer station to be 
located at our sanitary landfill. (To refresh your memory, a trans- 
fer facility is a refuse collection point of about two acres to which 
the Town's solid waste would be brought by private care and commer- 
cial hauler - Malco, Doherty, Miller - its volume reduced there by 
two-thirds by means of compaction equipment, and finally, from which 
our refuse would be trucked to an out-of-town commercial landfill for 
disposal .) 

Unfortunately, the refuse transfer program contemplated by the 
committee's Warrant Article, in particular because it employs out-of- 
town hauling and disposal of solid waste, will have a significantly 
higher annual operating cost than does Lincoln's current in-town land- 
filling program, or, for that matter, than would almost any plan using 
an in-town landfill incur in annual expense. Moreover, a program of 
refuse transfer and out-of-town disposal suffers under severe vulner- 
ability to future inflation of the fees charged for commercial haul 
and disposal, as the cost of vehicular fuels inevitably rises, as the 
number of commercial landfills in eastern Massachusetts decreases 
through aggressive government regulation and as the resulting accel- 
erated depletion of capacity occurs for the remaining approved land- 
fills. However, after three years' study of the problem, it is this 
committee's determination that, all things considered, there exists 
no suitable site in Lincoln itself for solid waste disposal other than 
for a transfer station. 



148 



The committee's work during 1977 helped confirm this judgment. 
During our presentation of a disposal plan Warrant Article at the 
1976 Town Meeting, there came a proposal from the floor that the 
sand and gravel pits located on the west side of the DiPerna Con- 
servation Land would be suitable as a new landfill, and then fol- 
lowed a formal motion to withhold appropriations for any new pro- 
gram until study of the DiPerna possibility that received an affirm- 
ative vote. With that directive, our activity for the year cen- 
tered on investigation of the various dimensions of refuse disposal 
at DiPerna. 

There were three discrete areas of study concerning the sub- 
ject. As the 105 acres of the DiPerna parcel are dedicated con- 
servation land and thus came under the administration of the Con- 
servation Commission, the Commissioners ordered that engineering 
studies of the physical characteristics of the DiPerna pits and 
hydrological survey of all surrounding areas be accomplished as a 
first step. The data generated in this effort was most encourag- 
ing. The Town engineering consultants, Cleverdon, Varney § Pike, 
reported that the gravel pits appeared most suitable for landfilling, 
that, as a bonus, there were significant quantities of covering 
material on site, and that there would be no danger of leachate pol- 
lution to the water table in that area. 

The committee then proceeded with development and cost analysis 
of a plan for operation. As any access to the DiPerna pits would 
enter from off a stretch of Route 2 of often demonstrated danger, 
our consistent planning premise was to locate an inexpensive trans- 
fer station elsewhere and have only a refuse hauling truck negotiate 
in and out of DiPerna. Even with the inclusion of an expensive 
landfilling tractor, hauling vehicle and second-hand backhoe body in 
the capital expense, the total annual cost of our transfer station- 
DiPerna landfill program we estimated to be 20% less than the total 
annual cost of the transfer station package we had taken before Town 
Meeting in 1976. During February, the League of Women Voters held 
several public meetings on the use of DiPerna, including two in North 
Lincoln that were enthusiastically attended by many residents neigh- 
boring on the DiPerna Land. The feedback from those in attendance 
was almost totally and emphatically negative. Not only was there 
much opposition in principle to the use of conservation land for a 
non-conservation purpose, but also the plan we presented won hearty 
disapproval, mostly on the basis of frequent truck trips through the 
neighborhood from transfer station to landfill - 14 one-way trips on 
Saturday, for example - and of extensive landfilling time at DiPerna, 
which would be disruptive of tranquility of the whole conservation 
area. The solution to overcoming these worthy objections lay in re- 



149 



turning to a plan for a more expensive compactor-equipped transfer 
station, because with compaction we could limit truck trips to 10 
to 12 one-way a week and avoid landfilling at DiPerna most Satur- 
days. However, this refinement cut a major portion of the savings 
anticipated from the use of DiPerna and when, as Town Meeting 1977 
approached, the State DPW informed us that even for truck access 
Lincoln would most likely be required to provide an acceleration- 
deceleration lane at the DiPerna access, the total annual cost (some 
$74,000) became essentially of the same magnitude as a refuse trans- 
fer with out-of-town disposal at 1977 prices. Moreover, the Di- 
Perna landfill plan achieved that level of cost before the unascert- 
ainable, though probably significant, expense of having Town Counsel 
go to the State Courts concerning the legal status of DiPerna. 

This legal dimension was the third and final general area for 
the committee to investigate. At the 1976 Town Meeting, the North 
Lincoln resident who originally proposed the DiPerna use, and whose 
motion to study the option won approval by the voters, character- 
ized landfilling at DiPerna as a method to reclaim the pits to a 
grade more suitable for recreational purposes as much as a waste dis- 
posal solution. The legal question centered then on whether the 
State Courts would view landfilling as an allowable way to reclaim 
and improve conservation land under the wording of Amendment Article 
97 of the Massachusetts Constitution, adopted in 1972. On the 1977 
Town Meeting Warrant, the Selectmen sponsored an Article seeking an 
appropriation toward an effort by Town Counsel to seek a declaratory 
judgment in court on this issue. 

The Conservation Commission from the beginning had insisted 
that final responsibility for judgment of the DiPerna situation at 
the end of this committee's investigations had to be its own. In 
mid-March, 1977, the Transfer Station Study Committee formally pre- 
sented its plans, cost analyses and perspectives to the Conservation 
Commission. Subsequently, the Commissioners voted unanimously 
against the use of the DiPerna land and in fact of all land under 
its jurisdiction for refuse disposal purposes. As a result, the 
Selectmen withdrew their Warrant Article, and Lincoln stepped to the 
starting line of an out-of-town waste disposal solution. 



150 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

H. Arnold Mac Lean 

Vincent N. Merrill 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 



Considerable damage was suffered in all the cemeteries as a 
result of the heavy storm in May. However, after cleaning up, we 
believe time will heal the scars. This emergency delayed more 
basic tree work, which we expect to carry out this coming year. 

We recommended to the 1977 Annual Town Meeting the Town's pur- 
chase of two lots adjacent to the Lexington Road Cemetery to meet 
protection and space needs for the foreseeable future. This recom- 
mendation was the result of many years of thought and negotiation. 
It was defeated by only 9 votes. The recommendation was again pre- 
sented to the June 15th Special Town Meeting, and we are pleased 
that it approved purchase of the 5.2 acre lot to the west of the 
Cemetery entrance. This purchase provides space and permanent 
protection to that side of the property. However, the Commission 
regrets that the Town Meeting failed to purchase the lot to the east 
of the entrance. We have long been of the opinion that circumstan- 
ces beyond our control might develop that would cause this land to 
be sold for house lots. Our fears are being realized as develop- 
ment is proposed which would place two houses immediately adjacent 
to presently used cemetery lots on the east boundary. We will con- 
tinue to negotiate for this area, an area vital to the protection 
and future space needs of the cemetery. We have no hesitation in 
recommending to the Town that this land be acquired. The future 
citizens of the Town deserve no less from us. Therefore, we hope 
to have worked out a purchase and sale agreement by the March Town 
Meeting which will happily satisfy all concerned. 

It should be pointed out that the land acquired this year was 
paid for out of cemetery funds accumulated by the Commission for 
this purpose from lot sale income. It in no way affected the tax 
rate. We have additional funds available toward the purchase urged 
above, and any additional borrowed funds will be amortized through 
sale of lots and so will not affect the tax rate in future years. 

The Cemetery Fund, into which funds received from the sale of 
lots are placed, amounts to $12,618.59 after deducting $45,000 for 
the purchase of 5.2 acres of land to the west of the Lexington Road 



151 



Cemetery entrance in accordance with the vote at the June 15th 
Special Town Meeting. We would like to point out that these 
funds over the years have earned in the neighborhood of $25,000 
in interest, but that, due to bookkeeping practices of the Town, 
this interest has been added to Free Cash. We feel strongly that 
this amount should be credited to the Cemetery Fund in order to 
convey a fair record of the full value of this Fund, which we have 
so consistently built up to meet major Cemetery needs. 

We would like to point out that Warren Flint is agent for the 
Cemetery Commission and is available through the Town Hall should 
you have any questions. 

There have been 17 interments in 1977 and 16 lots have been 
sold. 



152 



PIERCE PARK COMMITTEE 

Elizabeth Corcoran 

Margaret Flint 

William A. King 

Margot Lindsay 

Aulikki 01 sen 

William Shea 

Henry M. Morgan, Chairman 



The present committee was appointed as a result of action taken 
on Article 19 of the Special Town Meeting of June 1977. The charge 
to the committee comes from the wording of the motion, "to review 
the purposes for which the Pierce Park property was given to the 
Town, to consider the total present uses of the property, and to 
recommend to the Town at the earliest possible time a program of 
improvement and protection, including costs, and to establish pri- 
orities to accomplish said program..." 

The early considerations of the committee concentrated on the 
park, its uses, misuses and abuses. The problems in the park begin 
with warm days in April, when people from within Lincoln and without 
seek the pleasures of the beautiful green open space. The committee 
believes that the park should continue to be made available to all 
who will use it properly. To insure proper use, the committee pro- 
poses ways to help solve the major problems: 

1) The placement of attractive signs stating regulations for 
the park. 

2) The establishment of limited parking to the right of the 
existing driveway to the Pierce House, capable of holding 
10-20 cars. With the prohibition of parking on Weston 
Road, we believe attractive limited parking close to the 
park grounds, but separate from the house is desirable. 
Appropriate landscaping will be recommended. 

3) Provision for attractive rubbish containers which will be 
regularly emptied. These must be "dog -proof". 

4) Use of Conservation Commission Rangers to patrol the park 
during times of peak use. 

5) Unsolved as yet, but recognized as a problem, is the lack 
of toilet facilities. The committee has not yet found 






153 



an adequate solution to recommend to the Town. 

The committee is proposing that funds for the above activities 
be appropriated at the March Town Meeting. 

The second set of considerations revolve around the use of the 
house. The current policies give priority to uses in the following 
order of preference: 

A) Official Town purposes 

B) Use by the Lincoln School system 

C) Use by non-profit Lincoln organizations 

D) Private functions of Lincoln residents 

E) Private functions of non-Lincoln residents. 

We recommend continuing the present policies with some liberal- 
ization on the frequency of use for functions of non-Lincoln resident 
These functions provide the bulk of the income used to cover the oper 
ating expenses of Pierce House. We believe it important to protect 
the principal funds. We also believe that income from these funds 
should be available for major repairs, upkeep and improvements. 

The Pierce Park Committee makes these recommendations, but 
believes there will be a continuing need for a committee to assist 
the Selectmen in monitoring the appropriate use of the Park and House 

Specific regulations and further policy changes will be recom- 
mended to the Selectmen. 



154 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

Donna Burt 

John Barry 

Albert Nelson 

William Rizzo 

Sarah Stevenson, Chairman 



The Celebration Committee centered 1977 on town activities 
after such a full year of activities nationally oriented. The 
three main holidays were Patriots Day, Memorial Day and Independence 
Day. All three were announced by a town wide mailing, and all were 
well attended. 

The traditional Patriots Day centered around the activities of 
the Lincoln Minute Men. The re-enactment of the capture of Paul 
Revere was the highlight of the day. 

On Memorial Day the citizens participated in a parade from Town 
Hall cemetery to the other two town cemeteries. The Honor Guards 
of the American Legion and the Lincoln Fire and Police participated. 
The Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts and Brownies all participated. The 
Keay sisters played taps and the echo. 

Town wide talents were drawn upon for this years 4th of July 
celebration. Warren Flint did an excellent job as this year's 
Parade Marshall, leading us off in grand style. Dick Puffer was 
the Childrens Parade Marshall, seeing to it that everyone had a flag 
to decorate bikes with. The Grange was terrific to once again cook 
chicken for the entire town. The Selectmen provided the financial 
assistance to make the supper possible. The Waverly Post Band pro- 
vided music most of the day, and the Common Ground provided weary 
dancers with square dance music in the evening. The emphasis for 
this and the other two days was on townspeople. We feel it is our 
responsibility to increase activity in the holidays by publicity 
and build interest in town wide celebrations. Hopefully everyone 
who worked so hard to make these celebrations a success feels that 
their hard work was appreciated by all. It certainly was by the 
committee. Thank you! 



155 



MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
Robert Nash, Superintendent 



The Interim Report of the Boston National Historic Sites 
Commission to the Congress, dated June 16, 1958, pertaining to the 
Lexington-Concord Battle Road, recommended the creation of Minute 
Man National Historical Park, and the legislation authorizing such 
action, Public Law 86-321, was passed in the first session of the 
86th Congress and approved by President Eisenhower on September 21, 
1959. On December 14, 1970, Public Law 91-548 amended the act of 
September 21, 1959, to revise the boundaries of Minute Man National 
Historical Park. 



Visitation at Minute Man 

Visitation showed a decrease of approximately 15% less than 
1976. Total figure for the year 1976 was 1,165,150, whereas the 
figure for 1977 was 989,087. 

Battle Road Visitor Center 

Located on Route 2A at the Lexington-Lincoln town line, this 
facility is open November 1 - April 1, Wednesday through Sunday, 
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. It is open seven days a week from April 1 
through October 31. Summer schedule is in effect June through 
August when the building is open 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

A 25-minute film, "To Keep Our Liberty", is shown every half 
hour. The film traces the events which led up to the beginning 
of the Revolutionary War. A fibre-optics program lasting six 
minutes illustrates the British march and retreat on April 19, 1775 
Exhibits are on display in the lobby. Sales and informational 
materials are also available. 

The Wayside 

Located on Route 2A in Concord, The Wayside was the home of 
Samuel Whitney, Concord's Muster Master in 1775. Later it became 
the home of the Alcotts, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Margaret Sidney. 
Open April 1 - October 31, Thursday through Monday, 10:00 a.m. - 
5:30 p.m. There is a twelve-minute audio-visual program on the 
history of the house and its occupants in The Wayside Barn. 



156 



North Bridge Visitor Center 

Located in the former Buttrick Mansion on Liberty Street in 
Concord, this facility is open year round except Christmas and New 
Year's Day. Sales and informational materials are available. A 
replica of the Bedford Flag and other exhibits are displayed in the 
lobby. 

Colonial Living Interpretive Center 

The Major John Buttrick house on Liberty Street in Concord 
serves as an interpretive center where programs for school children 
who are interested in learning about 18th century life, are present- 
ed on Mondays and Thursdays. Groups are limited to 15; reserva- 
tions are necessary. 

Programs Presented During 1977 

Minute Man National Historical Park has continued to try to 
offer a variety of programs which are both interesting and educa- 
tional, the aim of which is to help the Park visitors gain a better 
understanding of the events of April 19, 1775, and their signifi- 
cance, as well as some understanding of life generally in 18th cen- 
tury Massachusetts. 

The Colonial Garden program involves 4th and 5th graders in 
growing vegetables and herbs common in the 18th century, using tools 
of that period. Dressed in colonial clothing, the children inter- 
pret the project to Park visitors at the David Brown house site near 
the North Bridge. 

Evening concerts were presented by the Concord Band on the 
grounds of the North Bridge Visitor Center in June and July. 

18th century Town Meetings were re-enacted on the grounds of 
the North Bridge Visitor Center on Saturday afternoons in June, 
July, August, September, and October. 

18th century Fashion Shows were held at the Battle Road Visitor 
Center in July, August, and October. 

Living history programs were presented during the summer by 
various Minute Man and Militia companies and British regiments as 
Volunteers in the Park. 

A "Walk with a Minute Man" through the North Bridge area was 
presented Friday afternoons during July and August. 






157 



Superintendent 

Robert Nash was appointed as Superintendent of the Park in 
February 1977, replacing David Moffitt. He and his family reside 
in the "Bullet Hole House" in Concord. 

General Management Plan 

Although work on a new General Management Plan for the Park 
was scheduled to begin in 1977, sufficient funds were not appropri- 
ated for the project and it had to be postponed. Once begun, the 
plan will call for public participation in determining the future 
development of the Park. 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Elizabeth Donaldson 
Sumner Smith 
John Todd 
Margaret Wengren 
Ruth Wales, Chairman 



Publication of "The Nathan Brown Farm" was the major accomplish- 
ment of the Lincoln Historical Society in 1977. Written by Kerry 
Glass, with contributions from Thomas Carley and John MacLean, the 
report traces the 300-year development and evolving land uses of an 
eighteenth century family farm near the center of Lincoln. The 
48-page booklet includes maps and photographs, and was type-set 
and printed by Minuteman Tech. Nearly all of the 400-copy edition 
has been distributed to interested residents by the Library and the 
Town Hall. The Commission plans to publish additional reports of 
research as completed manuscripts become available. Eighteenth 
century land features and land development patterns will be the sub- 
ject of the next pamphlet. 

Reviewing, revising, and expanding the inventory of Lincoln 
historic sites and structures filed with the Massachusetts Historical 



158 



Commission in 1966 became the primary responsibility of the Lincoln 
Historical Commission when it was established by vote of the Town 
in 1974. The inventory was based on the 1935 manuscript photographs 
and notes on "Houses in Lincoln Older than 100 Years" assembled by 
Edward and Samuel Farrar, but also listed public buildings and two 
contemporary houses. The first stage of this task is now complete. 
The 1966 inventory has been edited, corrected, augmented with addi- 
tional documentation, and recorded on new State forms. John C. 
MacLean, who has been employed by the Commission to carry out this 
project, combined material on pre-1775 houses collected by the Lin- 
coln Historical Society with his own research to provide complete 
and accurate data for each listed structure. Copies of the up- 
dated inventory are on file in the Historical Room at the Library. 
The second stage involves identifying and recording additional en- 
tries for the inventory. Two areas of archeological/historical 
interest have been included. Each identifiable feature of the grist 
mill site off of Mill Street was documented by Betty Little, and the 
Minuteman muster field on Sandy Pond Road was recorded by Kerry 
Glass. Seven houses of historic value built later than the Farrar 
brothers 1835 cut-off date will be added to the listing in 1978 as 
Jack MacLean completes the necessary research. 

Renewed interest in the possibility of establishing a Historic 
District in the center of Lincoln has resulted from the neighborhood 
meetings on land use sponsored by the Planning Board. After dis- 
cussing the issue with the Commission, a group of residents decided 
to survey the attitudes of other home-owners in the area. If there 
is sufficient interest in a District, the Commission will ask the 
Selectmen to appoint an official Study Committee to consider the 
question and report to the Town. 

The Lincoln Historical Commission meets regularly three times 
a year (October, January, and May), generally on the third Thursday, 
and usually in the home of one of the members of the Commission. 
Special meetings are scheduled when necessary. All meetings are 
open. Anyone wishing to attend a Commission meeting should confirm 
date and location beforehand. 



159 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARM, INC. 

DIRECTORS 

John Solman, President Marion Heijn 

Louise Davy Robert Loud 

Louise DeBaryshe Margaret Marsh 

Elizabeth Donaldson Roy Raja 

John Dunkle R. Langdon Wales 

Harry Had ley Wendy Wood 

Bob Henderson, Farmer 



Codman Community Farm completed its fifth year with more agri- 
cultural and educational activities than ever. The year started 
with maple sugaring and ended with our popcorn project. We added 
some new community projects, notably, a lecture on "How to Plan Your 
Garden" by Gwyn Loud and Ann Coburn, a joint lecture with the Lin- 
coln Garden Club by Penelope Turton from the Sterns Organic Farm in 
Framingham, a trip to Caprilands Farm in North Coventry, Conn, to 
view their many herb gardens and a series of canning demonstrations 
by Callie Henderson. We have purchased canning equipment which is 
available to all members for use at the Milkhouse. 

Garden plots again increased with 131 plotters actively farm- 
ing 150 of the 165 plots available. Watertown Dairy kindly donated 
5 loads of cow manure for use by the plotters. We have also been 
hired to prepare the garden plots for Sudbury Community Garden for 
the past two years and this year were asked to do the same for Way- 
land Gardens. 

Codman sales increased in 1977 from $17,028 to $21,593, an in- 
crease of 26.8%. Our newest project, winter rye, worked better than 
anticipated and will be enlarged next year. We harvested both grain 
and straw. The grain was sold for seed to be used for winter cover 
crops, chicken feed and to make bread. In addition, it was used as 
a cover crop for 25 acres of our own farm land which saved us about 
$400. The straw was sold for mulch and bedding. An ancient com- 
bine was purchased and pressed into service to learn the potential 
of this project. It survived this season but must be extensively 
re-furbished or replaced in 1978. 

A new field that we farmed this year was 7 acres of Farrar Pond 
Village's conservation land which was used for pumpkins, sweet corn 
and popcorn. This land will eventually be put into hay. We also 



160 



invested in a new John Deere rotary mower which is used for mainten- 
ance of hay fields and custom mowing. 

With special thanks to Mr. and Mrs. William Ryan we were able 
to have a farm stand on Route 117 as well as the stand at Codman 
Farm. In the 49 days these stands were open, we sold 1460 dozen 
ears of corn. 

This year we had 12 young people working with the farmer, 9 
from Lincoln and 3 from Essex Agricultural and Technical Institute. 
The farm payroll was $13,235. These youngsters work at many things 
which broadens their learning experience in operating a farm. The 
jobs include planting, haying, weeding, sales at the stand, harvest- 
ing corn, squash and pumpkins, and repairing farm equipment. It is 
hoped that next summer we can have special plots farmed by Lincoln 
youth for produce sales at the stands. We certainly encourage more 
Lincoln youth involvement in farming and in our programs. We would 
also like to thank the many Lincoln adults and young people for their 
volunteer help in harvesting squash, pumpkins, popcorn and indian corn, 

The warm feeling of townspeople for the Farm becomes evident at 
Fair time, when so many volunteers donate their services to those 
activities needing help. Activity chairmen call on their friends 
to give a hand, as often as not involving non-members as well as 
members. Even major responsibilities have been taken by non-members, 
as when Linda McConchie chaired the 1977 supper. The Boy Scouts 
and Girl Scouts never fail to give invaluable assistance. By par- 
ticipation in the Fair, some residents have gotten their first plea- 
sant exposure to CCF as an organization. This community involvement 
contributes to the feeling that Codman Farm is truely part of the 
Town, and the good will of the Fair goes beyond that of the day itself 



161 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 
Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances 
Years Ended November 30, 1977 and 1976 



1977 



1976 



Operating revenues: 
Sales: 
Hay 

Vegetable crops 
Livestock 
Custom work 
Total sales 

Dues 

Garden plot fees 

Fair 

U.S.D.A. cost sharing 

Interest 

Other 

Total operating revenues 

Operating expenses: 
Labor 

Seed and livestock 
Fertilizer and lime 
Repairs 
Depreciation 
Feed 
Rentals 
Supplies 
Fuel costs 

Insurance, taxes and fees 
Freight and utilities 
Legal and audit 
Bad debts 
Interest 

Office supplies and expense 
Total operating expenses 

Operating loss 

Non-operating revenue - unrestricted gifts 

Excess of revenues over expenses 

Fund balances at beginning of year 
Fund balances at end of year 



$ 7,320 


$ 8,197 


8,221 


5,664 


2,160 


1,080 


3,892 


2,087 


21,593 


17,028 


2,027 


2,485 


1,048 


- 


2,485 


2,488 


1,438 


364 


248 


199 


464 


377 


29,303 


22,941 


13,652 


10,426 


2,320 


1,385 


4,119 


2,767 


2,234 


1,220 


2,486 


2,269 


1,326 


1,083 


606 


508 


679 


875 


945 


577 


1,264 


632 


146 


157 


624 


501 


- 


35 


- 


101 


702 


594 


31,103 


23,130 


(1,800) 


(189) 


5,548 


8,822 


3,748 


8,633 


23,339 


14,706 


$ 27,087 


$ 23,339 



162 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC. 
Balance Sheet 
November 30, 1977 and 1976 



Assets 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Inventory 
Prepaid expenses 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost: 
Structures 

Motor vehicles and wagons 
Farm implements 

Less accumulated depreciation 
Net property and equipment 



Liabilities and Fund Balances 



Current liabilities: 
Accounts payable 
Accrued liabilities 

Total current liabilities 

Fund balances: 

Property and equipment fund 
Unrestricted fund 

Total fund balances 



1977 1976 



$ 


7,409 


$ 


3,753 




950 




398 




2,477 




2,340 




47 




550 




10,883 




7,041 




2,206 




2,206 




8,518 




8,518 




13,511 




11,355 




24,235 




22,079 




7,215 




4,729 




17,020 




17,350 


s 


27,903 


$ 


24,391 



$ 216 
600 
816 


$ 325 

727 

1,052 


17,020 
10,067 
27,087 


17,350 

5,989 

23,339 


$ 27,903 


$ 24,391 



163 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Term Expires 

Martha DeNormandie, Chairman Life Member 

Francis H. Gleason Life Member 

Thomas B. Adams (Resigned) Life Member 

Nancy Hammond (Appointed) Life Member 

R. John Hughes (Resigned) Selectmen Appointee 1978 

Kenton Ide (Appointed) Selectmen Appointee 1978 

Carolyn Birmingham School Committee Appointee 1979 

Katharine S. Bolt Elected by Town 1977 

It is gratifying to begin this report by saying that the repairs 
to the roof and archway of the main library were completed success- 
fully during the summer. It is also gratifying to report that the 
Lincoln Library is much more than just a repository for books. It 
is a meeting place for all ages, a quiet place to read, study, gain 
information, relax and listen to music. The circulation of books, 
records and magazines continues to increase, contrary to national 
trends. We believe this is due to sensitive book purchases by our 
librarians, excellent programs that lure young and old alike to the 
library, comfortable reading areas, gracious and helpful personnel 
and, of course, a central location. 

The increased use of reading areas and the results of a space 
study done by Trustees Nancy Hammond and Francis H. Gleason together 
with fellow citizen Lawrence B. Anderson, have encouraged the Trustees 
to consider the old entrance to the library as an additional reading- 
listening room. The multi-purposes to which the library is being 
used spurs the Trustees on to utilize every inch of space in the most 
profitable manner. Over the years the building has proven to be ex- 
tremely flexible. However, this flexibility is rapidly coming to an 
end and careful thought has gone into a proposed series of small 
changes which will provide more efficient use of space, without sacri- 
ficing or losing any of the quality or spirit of the building. 



164 



At the Special Town Meeting in June, 1977, the Trustees re- 
quested $1,000 for maintenance to the outside of the building. This 
amount covered costs of work undertaken to prevent major problems 
from developing. With the help of our custodian, John Bottino, the 
Trustees have established a list of priorities for projects both 
outside and inside the building. It is the intention of the Trustees 
to ask for an expanded building maintenance fund at the next Town 
Meeting to fund these projects. 

Along with considering the short and long term needs of the 
building, the Trustees and Librarian have focused their attention 
on reviewing and updating the personnel procedures and policies of 
the library in order to keep in line with other town employees. It 
is long overdue. A study done for the town's Personnel Board by 
Lee Associates of Concord, and recently completed, has provided us 
with constructive guidelines for future projections and recommenda- 
tions. 

During the past year, two Trustees, Thomas Boylston Adams and 
R. John Hughes, resigned due to the pressures of other commitments. 
Each in his own way made valuable contributions to the running of 
the Board and their resignations were accepted with regret and appre- 
ciation for their years of service. Nancy Hammond, who was the 
School Committee's appointment to the Board, became the third Life 
Trustee in place of Mr. Adams. She continues to serve as the able 
Secretary to the Board. Carolyn Birmingham was appointed to replace 
Nancy Hammond. Kenton Ide was appointed by the Selectmen to fill 
John Hughes' unexpired term. 

The library staff saw one change in the Circulation Department. 
Kathy Godfrey resigned to become a full-time graduate school student 
and her position was filled by Frances Colvin, a recent newcomer to 
the Hanscom Air Force Base. 

The Wednesday Morning Series of lectures, planned and directed 
by Ellen Cannon and Ethel Mackenzie; the Thursday night movies at 
the Town Hall, run by Jean Tenander, Librarian; and the programs 
created for young people by Heddie Kent and her staff, have all 
grown in audience appeal . Several programs have drawn overflow 
crowds which again raises the question of space and where we will 
expand to if we continue to grow. As mentioned earlier, the Trustees 
discuss this question regularly attempting to provide answers but 
postponing any real recommendations or solutions until a clearer 
picture of the town's total space needs and direction of building 
uses is available. Cooperative studies by town boards and committees 
are being done in this area. 

In response to an expressed need by townspeople, a large calen- 



165 



dar of events has been started and is posted just inside the front 
door on an easel which, as a point of interest, is part of the 
original equipment of the library. Town organizations and citizens 
are urged to use this service and develop the habit of registering 
dates of meetings, current and future. Also, in response to towns- 
people's request, a new Xerox copying machine was installed last 
fall. It has been well received and is used heavily. 

The Historical Room and Vault are also being used more and 
more. A young man from Japan arrived one day to do research on 
Ephraim Flint, an early resident and minister. He stayed longer 
than he intended due to the unexpected scope of available material 
and interest. John Teele, of Concord, also visited the room to 
get ideas for Concord's storage of town records. Both of these 
visits were significant to us and indicated the value of such a 
facility not only to the town but to outsiders as well. Margaret 
Martin, Margaret Flint and John MacLean continue with their research 
and work on town records. With funds given to the Town Historian, 
microfilming of old reports will proceed. Mary Ann Tricarico, 
Assistant Librarian, planned three, well-attended, afternoon teas 
celebrating acquisitions to the collection. Each year several gifts 
are made to the Historical Room which expand its collections and 
add to the memorabilia of our town. The Trustees are deeply appre- 
ciative of these contributions and know that over the years they 
will grow in value. Special mention should be made of the purchase 
of the Babbitt Papers by the Lincoln Historical Society and their 
subsequent gift to the Historical Room. These papers were the 
subject of a loan exhibit last year, arranged by John and Mary 
Loud. With their purchase, they will become a part of our perm- 
anent collection. This type of cooperation between town organiza- 
tions is especially valuable for it indicates joint support of 
projects making possible together, something impossible alone. 

Numerically, the library consists of 6 Trustees, 11 staff mem- 
bers and 2 custodians. Actually, it consists of many, many more 
who give of themselves and demonstrate a feeling for the library. 
The library is a better place because of their contributions whether 
they be in terms of volunteer service, plowing the walkways, patrol- 
ling the building, fresh flowers for the desk, professional advice, 
duplicate books and magazines, or gifts of financial support. The 
Trustees of the library can not truly express their gratitude and 
appreciation for the continued interest and help of loyal friends. 

In conclusion, the library belongs to every one in the town -- 
the Trustees' goal is to make each and every citizen aware of this 
and have its programs and services continue to grow. 



166 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STAFF - 1977 



Jean Tenander 
Mary Ann Tricarico 
Helen Kent 
Margaret Sykes 
Carolyn Henebry 
Marjorie Snyder 
Phyllis MacFarland 
Mary Irwin 
Nancy Gregory 
Frances Colvin 
Audrey Dedinsky 

John Bottino 
Robert Bottino 



Head Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Cataloger 

Administrative Assistant 

Technical Services 

Circulation 

Circulation 

Typist 

Custodian 
Custodian 



Hours Open: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 8:30 pm 
Tuesday and Friday 9 am to 6 pm 

Saturday 10 am to 5 pm 

Closed on legal holidays and on Saturdays in July 
and August. 

Trustee Meetings: First Tuesday of each month at the Library at 
7:30 pm. 



PAGES 

Evan Davies 
Linda Dedinsky 
Eric Haessler 
Helen Kaplan 
Tom Hill 
Mark Lo 

Jennifer Mozzi 
Margie Coffin 
Jennie Brannen 
Cayt Elwood 
Andy Rosen 
John Turner 
Bob Elwood 
Karen Zuelke 



PAGES IN TRAINING 

John Fraser 
Caron Smith 
Steve Levey 
Sharon Lo 
Lisa Sartori 



VOLUNTEERS 

Lucie Flint 
Dot tie Murphy 
Isabel Peirce 
Louise Rogers 
Betty Cope 
Donna Fraser 






167 



The following people gave books to the Library: 

Antoinette Brask Carolyn Birmingham 

James Pastoriza Alice DeNormandie 

Ellen Raja Ludwig Luft 

Emy Dickey Nancy Levi 

N. C. Webb Nancy Ellis 

Lucy Cole Albert Fullerton 

Martin Bovey Jean Preston 

Ted § Nyna Polumbaum Ellin Meriam 

Betty Little Elisabeth Worthington 

Roger Harris Apostle Lavrakas 

Charlie Segal Margaret Hubbard 

Rosina Anderson Susan Craig 

Ruth Hapgood Louise Butts 

Cheryl Wilson Jeanne King 

Georgine Herschbach 

These people gave gifts to the Library: 

Dr. § Mrs. Bradford Cannon Mr. Sumner Smith 

Mr. § Mrs. Donald Millard Miss Olive Floyd 
Mr. § Mrs. Harland Newton 



STATISTICS 

General 

Number of days open 290 

Fines collected $1952.00 

Acquisitions 
Books 

Inventory 1976 45,416 

Purchases 3,522 

Gifts .1,258 

Total inventory 49,196 

Discarded or lost 1,967 

Inventory 1977 47,129 

Records 

Inventory 1976 2,131 

Purchases 150 

Gifts 49_ 

Total inventory 2,330 

Discarded or lost 99 

Inventory 1977 2,231 



168 



Circulation 

Adult books 
Juvenile books 
Total books 



41,735 
27,975 
69,710 



Total all material 1977 circulation 



77,493 



WEDNESDAY MORNINGS AT THE LIBRARY 
1977-1978 

October 12 "Animals of East Africa" Arthur E. Thiessen 

Illustrated with colored slides. 

November 9 "Friendship Sloops and the Maine Robert C. Duncan 

Coast" 

Illustrated with colored slides. 
1978 

January 11 "Timely Topics 1978" Representative Ann 

Gannett 



February 8 
March 8 

April 12 

May 10 



"Lincoln's Miss Lonely Hearts" 

"Peking Before Mao" 
Illustrated with paintings and 
drawings by the speaker. 



Mrs . Thomas Winship 
Mrs. John K. Fairbank 



"36,000 Nautical Miles to Lincoln" Ranulf W. Gras 
The Gras family's experiences on 
a 5h year cruise around the world. 

"Spring Concert - String Ensemble" Program and musicians 

to be announced. 



CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT 

The Children's Department initated a series of new programs 
this year. The staff held book talks in October and November on 
Thursday afternoons. These talks were designed for children of 
all ages and are meant to encourage children to read and talk over 
books they have liked with each other and with the staff. 

Also several films were scheduled during vacation time for 
children for the first time. In addition story hour continued on 
Tuesday morning for pre-school children and the Library had its 
annual Halloween and Children's Christmas Party. The Christmas 
Party was a little too successful in fact. Over 150 children show- 
ed up and although the kids all seemed to be having a nice time the 



169 



staff really felt the lack of an adequate meeting space. 

FILM PROGRAM 

The Library continued into its third year of screening films 
at the Town Hall. The films varied, some being foreign and some 
American or English. By having a varied program the series attracts 
different people each time which the Library feels is very good and 
one of the things that makes the series a success. Although there 
is a loyal band of regulars who come to everything which is also 
nice it seems good that people of different interests find every 
third or fourth film to their liking. 

EXHIBITS 

The Library exhibited the works of several local artists: 
Helene Sherman (illuminated manuscripts), Peter A. Thomas (water 
colors), Ted and Judy Polumbaum (photographs), Mikki Ehrenfeld 
(photographs), Dorothy Thompson (etchings), Olive Floyd (pressed 
flowers), Jeffrey Melzack (oil paintings), Sophie Bair (weavings) . 

In addition in the Historical Room the Library exhibited the 
papers given to the Library by the Newton Nelson's and also the 
Chapin Diary given to the Library by the Chapin family. Robert 
Cunningham also made possible an exhibit of photographs from the 
Arnold Expedition. Nancy Hammond arranged with the Library Staff 
an exhibit of the covers of the children's magazine called Cricket. 



170 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Chester d'Autremont, President 

John Pike, Vice President and Clerk 

Walter Salmon, Treasurer 

Owen Beenhouwer 

Gerard Kirby 

Gregory Kolligian 

Robert Newman 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

The Museum has moved into 1978 with pride in the exhibitions; in 
the School; in the summer program of teaching art, dance and music; 
and joy over the Fiesta Folklorica held in June. The exhibit of 
sculpture and drawings of the great Mexican artist, Francisco Zuniga, 
which opened on the Fiesta weekend, was a particular triumph. Edith 
Tonelli arranged a superb and informative show of WPA art from the 
New England region. Our current show of watercolors with the theme 
"New England in Winter", reinforced with a scattering of striking 
woodburning stoves from many areas, is a smash hit. 

While the Town has enjoyed these, and the delightful evening 
"Lincoln Loves Lincoln", the Board confronts a number of issues, old 
and new. We are always puzzled by the number of residents in the 
Town who, in spite of at least annual reminders from the Museum and 
from other sources of general information, still don't know they can 
visit all exhibits free. We are unhappy to hear complaints of exces- 
sive traffic to the Museum, although heavy traffic actually is rare 
(four to five times a year) ; the issue has become entangled in concern 
about traffic in and around Pierce Park, or to and from the Carroll 
School. 

A growing concern involves the governance of a nationally known 
museum, 85% of whose membership is now outside the Town. In June we 
had a lively meeting of the Corporation - one of the best attended 
annual meetings ever held - at which alternatives for governance were 
discussed. Since then the Board has tackled the more difficult ques- 
tion of specific changes in Museum governance, changes which are inter- 
woven with any plans for even the most modest increase in facilities. 
The Board voted to have the Chairmen of the Associate Council and the 
Business Council sit at its meetings to add their knowledge, though 
they have no vote. We enjoy their help and their support. We must, 
however, find a way to better represent the large constituency outside 
of Lincoln. It is our major task for the coming year. 

A committee of the Board, headed by John Pike, has tackled the 



171 



job of reviewing the Museum's goals and functions and planning for 
possible modest expansion. It is no secret that we need some basic 
improvements: storage space for the permanent collection; workspace 
for such things as printing, photography, shipping, uncrating, and so 
on; improvements in existing facilities; and another gallery to allow 
for broader exhibits and to show our own permanent collection. We 
are working toward realistic plans for these pressing needs. We will 
need wide support to accomplish this, and look to all those associated 
with the Museum to do what needs to be done. 

I want to thank Fred Walkey for his constant work to improve all 
parts of the Museum, for his never-ending flow of ideas, and his abil- 
ity to produce creative tension in the Board. I want to thank Walter 
Salmon for his hard work, skill and patience in making sense of the 
Museum's finances in his capacity as Treasurer, and for his great part 
in keeping us "in the black". Finally, the extraordinary staff of the 
Museum and School deserve great credit for their ability to administer 
produce, teach and exhibit art in so many forms with such skill, en- 
thusiasm and verve. 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Frederick P. Walkey 

The year 1977 at DeCordova ended appropriately enough with a look 
at "New England in Winter". This was an exhibition of paintings by 
New England's most outstanding watercolorists, all dealing with the 
imagery of winter. An element of warmth was supplied by a display 
of 16 woodburning stoves, a museum first for DeCordova. 

The year began with a watercolor exhibition of a different sort: 
"Homer to Hopper" was an historical survey of the golden age of water- 
color painting in America. "The American Dream", many years in plan- 
ning, turned out to be a delightful collection of 19th century adver- 
tising posters, trade signs, and early packaging, documenting the 
rise of industry and the changing lifestyle of the American Consumer. 
As host of the 29th Boston Printmakers Annual, DeCordova succeeded in 
turning the competition into a truly national print show, with more 
than 1,800 works submitted. DeCordova was proud to be the first New 
England museum to present a major exhibition of the work of Francisco 
Zuniga, Mexico's leading sculptor, whose reputation will grow dramatic 
ally as his work is shown world wide. 

The WPA exhibition in the fall, "By the People, For the People, 
New England", was a major research effort, which brought to light 
many forgotten works of art, which have been in storage at public 
agencies and libraries. Special credit belongs to DeCordova 's Cura- 
tor, Edith Tonelli, for producing a catalogue which is a signifi 



172 



contribution to scholarship. 

In 1977, the Museum acquired 119 works of art for its collection, 
a number which is dramatic in comparison to the size of the total 
collection: about 650 at the beginning of the year. For its first 
25 years, DeCordova had no agressive acquisition program, and the 
collection was built on random gifts. In the last two years, we 
have begun to set aside resources to purchase works by living New 
England artists. This is in part a recognition of our obligation 
to be patrons of the best regional artists, which will result in 
a regional collection of excellence in only a few years. The 
opportunity to keep the collection on constant public view in the 
offices of our corporate members was also a stimulus to expand the 
collection. 

DeCordova' s June festival, "Fiesta Folklorica", was an exuberant 
and colorful production, highlighted by costumed dancers from Mexico 
and memorably delicious Mexican food. Our luck with the weather was 
uncanny. Thunder was audible on both days, as it stormed in Acton, 
Newton, and Framingham. But hardly a sprinkle fell on DeCordova. 
Special thanks go to Barbara Lee, Festival Chairman, and to the many 
Lincoln residents who worked hard to make the Fiesta a success. The 
Festival Committee made a commendable effort to deal effectively with 
parking, and the few cars that parked along roadsides were towed away. 

The amphitheater was improved by the installation of lights for 
evening performances . The first evening performance was an ambitious 
production by the Lincoln Players of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night". 
DeCordova utilized the amphitheater for a series of three evening 
performances, as well as four Saturday morning events for children. 
The Sunday afternoon series was again supported by a grant from the 
Dorothy S. F. M. Codman Trust. Highlights included a production of 
Godspell, the Pocket Mime Theater, and the Herb Pomerory Orchestra. 

"Lincoln Loves Lincoln", a party for all Lincoln residents, was 
held in late September, with Lincoln entertainment, a Lincoln art 
and craft exhibit, films of old DeCordova festivals, and a thoroughly 
enjoyable performance by the Boston Symphony Jazz Quintet. The Museum 
would like to express deep appreciation to Ellen Faran, who organized 
the event and served as Lincoln representative to the Associate 
Council for two years. 

The School 's new offices in the Caretaker's Cottage opened for 
business in the spring. The first floor of the Cottage was renovat- 
ed with funds contributed by Museum members, and in addition to pro- 
viding an attractive work area, has brought efficiency to the School 
management. Studio 6, which is the jewelry studio in the back of 
the Cottage, was also renovated, and windows were installed to im- 
prove the lighting and ventilation. 






173 



I would like to thank the 450 Lincoln families who are Decor- 
dova members and who support the Museum through their annual dues 
and contributions to the Annual Appeal. We are deeply grateful to 
each and every Lincoln member who contributes to the well being of 
DeCordova. This year for the first time, the total expenses of the 
Museum exceeded one million dollars. The budget in the Museum's 
first year, 1951, was $40,000. Thanks to all of you, we have 
enjoyed another successful year. 



174 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM FINANCIAL REPORT, 1977 
(with comparable figures for 1976) 



OPERATING INCOME 

Trusts 

Corporate Membership 

Family Membership 

Annual Appeal 

Festival 

Admissions 

Program Grants § Revenues 

School $ Store 

CETA Income 

All Other 

Total Operating Income 

OPERATING EXPENSE 

Administration § Development 

Program (Exhibits, Events, Collection) 

Festival 

Printing § Publication 

School Store 

Buildings § Grounds 

CETA Workers 

Capital Projects 

Total Operating Expense 

Operating Gain for Year 

Unemployment Back Payment 

Cash, as of December 31, 1977 



1976 



1977 



$133,075 


$145,299 


45,189 


57,979 


105,825 


112,780 


31,271 


38,837 


48,895 


55,989 


36,780 


41,490 


66,454 


85,058 


306,580 


327,829 


22,532 


11,660 


11,161 


14,378 



$807,762 



$891,299 



$193,846 


$217,019 


113,836 


119,295 


30,381 


50,231 


61,766 


78,084 


248,423 


296,737 


82,284 


79,907 


25,459 


8,694 


40,149 


34,891 


$796,144 


$884,858 


11,618 


6,441 


(13,593) 




$56, 


,266 



175 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

i 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS, December 31, 1977 

Chester d'Autremont, President 

John Pike, Vice President and Clerk 

Walter Salmon, Treasurer 

Owen Beenhouwer 

Gerard Kirby 

Gregory Kolligian 

Robert Newman 



BUSINESS COUNCIL, December 31, 1977 

Jack Carter, Chairman 
Robert Allen 
Richard Campobello 
John Cantlin 
Thomas Diab 
Ewan Fletcher 
Kenneth Germeshausen 
Elliott Grabill 
Gregory Kolligian 
Howard McMahon 
Peter Osgood 
Louis Rusitzky 
Paul Schratter 
Stephen Stone 



MUSEUM STAFF, December 31, 1977 

Frederick P. Walkey, Executive Director 

Ann Russell, Assistant Director 

Joan Kennedy, Administrative Assistant 

Martha DeFrancesco, Bookkeeper 

Kathleen Doherty, Receptionist 

Edith Tonelli, Curator 

Sherry Dworkin, Curatorial Assistant 

Linda Savage, Corporate Representative 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Secretary 

Cathy Roehrig, Membership Clerk 

Sharon O'Connor, Coordinator, Special Projects 

Steve Sakowich, Designer 

Linda Sevey, Photographer 

Ken Baker, Printer 

Frank Balduf, Maintenance Supervisor 



176 



MUSEUM STAFF (Continued) 

Michael Eppling, Custodian 
Rob Whitaker, Park Supervisor 
Maurice Johnson, Caretaker 



MUSEUM SCHOOL STAFF, December 31, 1977 

Merrie Blocker, Director 
Deborah Duncan, Registrar 
Lana Branton, Docent Coordinator 
Louise Taylor, Store Manager 
Bea Warren, Librarian 
John Anderberg, Custodian 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM ASSOCIATE COUNCIL, December 31, 1977 

Mrs. Robert Collings, Stow - Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Lee, Lincoln - Co-Chairman § Membership Chairman 

Mrs. Craig Foster, Concord - Hospitality Chairman 

Mrs. Max Mason, Lincoln - Hospitality Co-Chairman 

Mrs. Victor Lutnicki, Lincoln - Lincoln Garden Club 

Mrs. Nathaniel Brown, Bedford 

Mrs. William Maczko, Bedford 

Mrs. David Packer, Bedford 

Mrs. Ronald Massa, Bedford 

Mrs. Lowell McCarter, Carlisle 

Mrs. Vincent Dovydaitis, Carlisle 

Mrs. Franklin Lock, Carlisle 

Mr. Robert Stubblebine, Concord 

Mrs. David Kennedy, Concord 

Mr. Alan Frick, Concord 

Mrs. Brent Brentnall, Hanscom Field, Bedford 

Mrs. Barbara Winders, Acton 

Mrs. Gerald McLeod, Lexington 

Mrs. Charles Pearson, Lexington 

Mrs. Helga Waldman, Lexington 

Mrs. Robert Jevon, Lincoln 

Mrs. James Faran, Jr., Lincoln 

Mrs. Barrie Landry, Lincoln 

Mrs. Donald Hawes, Lincoln 

Mrs. Ronald Marcks, Lincoln 

Mrs. Joseph DePeyster, Needham 

Mrs. Floyd Frost, Stow 

Mrs. Richard Finigan, Sudbury 

Mrs. Alan Grace, Sudbury 

Mrs. Michael Weiss, Sudbury 



177 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM ASSOCIATE COUNCIL (Continued) 

Mrs. Donald Stowbridge, Sudbury 

Mrs. Betty Cullaty, Weston 

Mrs. John Grover, Weston 

Mrs. Allan Steere, Weston 

Mrs. Walter Einstein, Wellesley 

Mrs. David Marks, Wellesley 



178 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Algeo 

Eleanor T. King 

Gregory Mcdonald 

Frederick C. Richardson 

Mary J. Silverstein 

Louis H. Mutschler, M.D., Chairman 



The Recreation Committee encourages recreational programs for 
all town citizens. It consults with interested volunteer groups 
regarding the viability of proposed programs and the availability 
of physical facilities, dates, and town funds. It provides what- 
ever administration and publicity possible. Where conflicts arise 
between groups it tries to arbitrate upon the principle of making 
the best possible use of town resources. The committee members 
serve as liaison with subcommittees responsible for current recrea- 
tion programs. 

The Day Camp Committee continued to run a successful four week 
program for 270 children ages preschool - seventh grade. A staff 
of 55 was employed in addition to 10 counselors-in-training. 
Lincoln residents comprised 77% of the total staff. 

The Lincoln Youth Program (LYP) has operated under the aegis 
of the Recreation Committee since July 1976. After the resigna- 
tion of the first director in July 1977, a lengthy and thorough 
search led to the hiring of co-directors, one of whom later re- 
signed. The purpose of LYP is to plan and direct after school 
and weekend recreational activities for sixth-eighth grade children, 

The Tennis Committee studied various illumination systems, 
drew up specifications and followed through with the installation 
of lights for two courts. They also organized two tournaments, 
supervised maintenance and monitored court use during peak periods. 



179 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Roger Barzun 

Priscilla Damon 

Robert Frank 

James Spindler 

Lynn Donaldson, Chairman 

The education pendulum swings back and forth between two 
extremes. At one end is a permissive, child-directed, undisci- 
plined, non-competitive school; at the other an authoritarian, 
structured, exclusively academic, ruthlessly competitive one. 

Few support the extremes, but as points of reference they do 
define the direction one wishes to move in relation to one's per- 
ception of status quo. 

At the moment we are swinging back from an excessively un- 
structured system. Although it does not mean the same to all who 
support it, "back to basics" is in fact a national movement. 

When we hired Dan Cheever as superintendent in 1973, the major- 
ity of concerned parents had indicated they wanted the schools to 
expect more of children academically. They wanted more consistent 
expectations for teachers and students. 

We have made great strides toward these goals. Compared with 
the overly directed early 60' s and the overly undirected early 70 's 
we are at a point of healthy balance between attention to content 
and to children, to structure and flexibility, to individual crea- 
tivity and authority. 

Unquestionably there are areas of the program in need of cor- 
rection in one direction or the other, and it is always important 
to seek improvement to keep the program vital. But it is also 
important that we are sensitive to the balance and do not let the 
pendulum swing too far. 

The possibility of overcorrection is increased by several 
factors. First is the lag-time between when correction or adjust- 
ments are made at the schools and when they are perceived by the 
community. The hearsay windmill has a lot of force, frequently 
spinning out a long-ago story to back a point. And realistically 
it is very hard for people to know what is going on at the school 
and why, to understand the program as it is. 

The high cost of schools -- all schools -- provides further 



180 



impetus to the possibility of overcorrection. Financial pressure 
becomes pressure on the schools for change. Cost saving eventu- 
ally means elimination of something and it is hard to protect the 
balance as cuts are made. 

Another factor contributing to overcorrection is the diffi- 
culty in knowing when to go to bat for the present. It is hard 
to be committed to status quo because status quo is of course 
imperfect and change looks nearer to perfection. 

Certainly we do not want stagnant schools. Heaven forbid we 
should stop swinging altogether! But the arc of the pendulum 
could be large enough to allow for alterations and improvements 
without being so great that any notion of balance is forgotten. 
If the Town continues its long tradition of involvement in and 
commitment to excellent public schools, which includes taking re- 
sponsibility for being informed, the variety of view points will 
contain the swings, the excesses of either direction will be 
avoided, and the quality of our schools will prosper. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Daniel S. Cheever, Jr. 

Viewing 1977 from the perspective of the last few years, the 
administrators and professional staff of the Lincoln Public Schools 
have continued to work on priorities defined by the Lincoln School 
Committee. In this period, the School Committee had identified 
curriculum improvement and, more recently, cost control and teacher 
evaluation as our major priorities. This report briefly explains 
recent developments in each area. 

The Language Arts and Mathematics programs have now been re- 
vised by cirriculum committees composed of teachers from each 
school on both the Lincoln and Hanscom campuses. Each program 
defines a sequence of basic academic skills to be learned in that 
subject, with suggestions for appropriate materials. The chair- 
men of these committees -- Betty Bjork of Hartwell -Smith School, 
Kathy Steensma and Mary Considine of Hanscom Middle School -- have 
earned our thanks for a job well done. In addition, work is con- 
tinuing on the improvement of science and social studies programs 
in each school. Two schools have begun development of in-service 
"teacher helping" programs as well. 

The staff and I have appreciated the Town's willingness to 
provide funds for intensive summer work on this curriculim improve- 



181 



ment. Different school systems have different ways of updating 
their instructional programs. Some provide for new curriculum by 
hiring top-level administrators and curriculum supervisors. These 
people develop new programs on their own or coordinate the activity 

of others. Other school systems simply purchase new programs 

or don't purchase them during times of tight budgets. These sys- 
tems must rely on what educational publishers define as important 
subject matter for children. A few school systems, including Lin- 
coln, develop their own programs. They draw upon the talents of 
their staff, consultants, the best of published work, and the re- 
sults of research or innovative projects reported at national con- 
ferences or in the literature. Time during the summer, free from 
the daily demands of teaching, is essential for significant work. 
By involving many people in the development of a new curriculum, we 
simultaneously develop commitment and enthusiasm for its use. This 
process is more "grass roots" than "top down"; much of the research 
on curriculum reform demonstrates that effective change comes when 
teachers who will use a program are directly involved in its develop- 
ment. 

A related School Committee priority in 1977 was continued 
emphasis on teacher evaluation and staff development. In a time of 
declining enrollments (Lincoln's enrollment has declined steadily for 
ten years) evaluation and staff development are particularly impor- 
tant. There are fewer opportunities to hire new teachers and, in 
fact, good teachers must be cut each year. The administrators in 
the Lincoln Public Schools -- Bill Warren, Meredith Jones, Phil 
Reddy, Ron Hadge, and Elaine Bowditch -- have done a most profession- 
al job of helping the staff improve the quality of teaching. In 
addition, in the last four years we have helped many teachers on both 
campuses find employment elsewhere, including several with tenure. 
This has required considerable effort. Because of these staff 
changes the faculty has avoided any Reduction-In-Force (RIF) ; even 
though our enrollment has declined 25% in this period and one might 
have expected to face a Reduction-In-Force, none has occurred be- 
cause of this successful effort. 

We have today an outstanding group of teachers. They are 
hardworking, dedicated to children in the Town and at Hanscom Air 
Force Base, knowledgeable in their academic fields and skilled at 
teaching. Our staff is superb; not perfect but nearly so. Few 
among us could perform as well in these difficult times. 

During the past year, the School Committee remained committed 
to keeping the lid on school costs. Under the leadership of Muriel 
Weckstein as chairman, the School Committee examined several budget 
alternatives last year, adopting some which held this year's budget 
increase to only 1.7% With Mrs. Weckstein 's decision not to run 
for re-election and the selection of Lynn Donaldson as chairman, the 



182 



the School Committee continued its search for ways of cutting costs 
while improving the educational program. It appointed one citizen's 
committee, chaired by Liz Corcoran, to assist in this project and 
another, led by Sarah Holden, to examine the possibility of further 
regionalization. At this writing, the proposed budget increase for 
the present school program next year is only 1.2% with the prospect 
of further budget reductions before Town Meeting. Literally thou- 
sands of hours on cost control have been spent by the staff, members 
of the School Committee and its citizens committees. Their effort 
has produced qualitative improvements in the educational program 
with minimal budget increase of only 1.7% and 1.2% in the last two 
years. 

1977 saw several changes in school personnel. Mary Ann Wilson 
resigned as the Superintendent's secretary after a decade of skilled, 
devoted service. She was succeeded by Marcia Bibring, also a res- 
ident of the Town, who has continued Mary Ann's example of selfless, 
cheerful work on behalf of Lincoln and its schools. Ginnie Soderling 
left her position as Administrative Assistant after nearly eight 
years here to assume a similar position at the new Gulf Management 
Institute in Boston. Her careful attention to detail, hard work, 
and cheerful humor are remembered by all who worked with her. For- 
tunately, we enticed Paddy Correia to leave an administrative posi- 
tion at the University of New Hampshire and come to Lincoln. In her 
few months here, Paddy instituted several new management programs 
and assumed significant responsibility in many areas. We are de- 
lighted she has joined us. 

Roger Barzun and Jim Spindler were elected to the School Com- 
mittee, joined by Karolyn Givens, Dot Houston, and Joyce Payne as 
Hanscom Representatives. A change in her husband's assignment cut 
short Joyce Payne's term, and she was replaced by Pat Cassity. 
Lynn Donaldson has just announced her decision not to run for a third 
term; in her six years as a member of the Lincoln School Committee 
she has given us experienced leadership, hard work, good judgement, 
a sense of humor and perspective. Despite its size and changing 
membership (16 different members on the School Committee in the last 
five years, evenly divided between Lincoln and Hanscom representa- 
tives), the School Committee continues to provide careful oversight 
of the Town's schools. 

Several teachers have voluntarily resigned after many years' 
work in our schools. Dave Clevenson and Sylvia Feldman left last 
year, while Phyllis Johnson and Jake Jagel have announced their res- 
ignation at the end of this school year. Each of these staff members 
has worked diligently and conscientiously for the Lincoln Schools, 
and will be remembered by colleagues and children alike. 



183 



Helen Horn was elected President of the Lincoln Teachers' Asso- 
ciation (LTA) , succeeding Kathy Steensma. Last year also saw rati- 
fication of a two-year collective bargaining contract between the 
Teachers' Association and the School Committee, reached after leng- 
thy, difficult negotiations. In its last two contracts with its 
professional staff, the School Committee's sub-committee on negotia- 
tions has been ably chaired by Bob Frank and has reached its goal of 
bringing its salary scale in line with those of comparable communi- 
ties. To the credit of Lincoln's administrators and staff, in four 
years there has been only one formal grievance concerning a violation 
of the collective bargaining agreement. This fact indicates that 
once a contract is negotiated, both sides are able to work together 
within a mutual professional understanding of their contractual re- 
sponsibilities. 

Finally, this report is my last as Superintendent of the Lin- 
coln Public Schools, as I will be leaving to become Superintendent 
in Weston. This change will enable us to continue living in Lin- 
coln, a prospect which greatly pleases my family and me. I want 
to express my thanks to the staff and Town for their support in 
these five years. From one perspective, it has been a period of 
declining enrollments, inflation and escalating costs, collective 
bargaining, and just about every other issue one could imagine. 
From another point of view, however, the last five years have pro- 
vided me with an opportunity to work in a unique public school sys- 
tem, one whose staff and parents are perhaps unmatched by any other 
in Massachusetts. When I was appointed in 1973 -- as yet another 
new Lincoln superindendent who came to this job with no previous 
experience as a superintendent of schools --a senior member of the 
teaching staff was heard to mutter: "Oh dear, we've got to train 
another one." The staff and Town have trained me patiently, re- 
maining tolerant of my mistakes, amused by my whims, and supportive 
of my hopes. I remember these years, and them, with gratitude and 
affection. 



184 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1977 



Darius L. Agnew 
John Quintin Armstrong 
Tracy Lysa Barros 
Laura Louise Bell 
Dean Kierstead Bennett 
Elisabeth Bentley 
John Hill Birkett 
Kristen Diane Bjork 
Mary Charlene Blanchard 
Judith Munro Bobbitt 
Phyllis Renay Boseman 
Paula Anne Bouknight 
Stevie D. Bullock 
Lindsay C. Capen 
Direne Ortiz Carrion 
Dawn Michelle Carroll 
Leona Elizabeth Champeny 
Janis Ruth Chandler 
Margaret D. Coffin 
Andrew N. Com jean 
Reed Cooper 
Michael G. Corcoran 
Barbara Hume Dane 
Clarissa Dane 
Debra J. DeJesus 
Miguel De La Pena 
Erik Dempsey 
Cregg T. Dennis 
Victoria DeNormandie 
Bonnie Jean Drop 
Margot Mary Elias 
Jocelyn Elliott 
Jeanne Williams Emery 
Andrew J. Faddoul 
Marcia Fields 
Dawn-Marie Francis 
Hillary Jane Frank 
Terrance R. Frazier 
Josie Anne Freed 
Marcella M. Fusillo 
Jill Gallagher 
Julia Anne Garbus 
Christopher C. Gillis 
Berta Greaves 
Felicity H. Green 



Sara Guthrie Grim 

Eric H. Haessler 

Kara Harding 

Lauren Blanche Hawes 

Rachel E. Heart 

Ethan C. Heijn 

Mary Elizabeth Henebry 

Thomas E. C. Hill 

David P. Holland 

Wendy Elizabeth Hughes 

Andreas J. P. Ide 

Elaine Denise Jackson 

William B. Jackson 

Christopher Michael Kassner 

Kimberley Ann Kendrick 

Nita B. Klobouchar 

Jonathan Lee Kramer 

Andrew Langton 

Emily Sara Lavine 

Kerry Helen Levey 

Elizabeth Hatheway MacMahon 

Kevin Kirby Mahoney 

Judyann Manuel 

David B. McKnight, Jr. 

Susan Mary Mecsas 

David D. Messina 

Thomas H. Mills 

Alfred S. Morency 

Tanya Nash 

James David Nelms 

Michael David Nelson 

Susan Niles 

Benjamin J. Nisbet 

Margaret H. Nunes 

Jane Rooney O'Loughlin 

David L. Palmer 

Eevelyn May Louise Patterson 

Laura Payne 

Martha S. Phinney 

Mark Edward Pianka 

Randall C. Piatt 

Ian Polumbaum 

Rebecca Anne Pugh 

Andrew S. Rosen 

Indrian Lea Ross 



185 



Bonnie Lee Russes 

Rachel R. Sheridan 

Donna Elizabeth Snelling 

Charles E. Stankard, III 

Marie-Madeleine Steczynski 

Duncan G. M. Street 

Alex Sugar 

Stephanie Alison Sutton 

Rebecca Parkhurst Sykes 

Reginal Donnel Tarver 

Ellen Cooper Taschioglou 

Janet Manning Taylor 

Shawn C. Terrell 

Velma A. Terry 

Kenneth L. Trotman 

John Murray Turner 

William David Venter, Jr. 

Albert W. Weggeman 

Craig R. Whatley 

Wendy Whitman 

George Christopher Williams 

Jennifer Wollmar 

Ronald Workman 

Lynn Mary Zuelke 



186 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Administrative Staff 

Appointed 

Daniel S. Cheever, Jr. Superintendent of Schools 1973 

Virginia Soderling (resigned) Administrative Assistant 1970 

Paddy Correia (appointed) Administrative Assistant 1977 
Robert Budds Director of Operations g 

Maintenance 1976 

Philip J. Reddy Director of Pupil Services 1966 

William M. Thompson Metco Coordinator 1971 

William S. Warren, Jr. Principal, Hartwell-Smith School 1970 

Meredith Jones Principal, Brooks School 1970 

Ronald A. Hadge Principal, Hanscom Middle School 1970 
Elaine P. Bowditch Principal, Hanscom Primary 

School 1976 

School Nurses 

Maria Pugatch (resigned) Lincoln Schools 
Nancy Borghese (appointed) Lincoln Schools 
Gladys Crumb, R. N. Hanscom Schools 

Hours: Office of the Superintendent 

8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Monday - Friday 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system 
6:30 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 

7:00 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 

7:10 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio announcements will be read between the period of 6:30 a.m. and 
7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up local phone lines to school 
officials, fire station and bus operators. 

(WACQ 1150K; WBZ 1031K; WHDH 850K) 

Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the Lincoln Super- 
intendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools (Grades K-8) 
only. Announcements for the Regional High School are made by the 
Regional Superintendent of Schools and will be designated "Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School." 



187 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ENROLLMENT as of Octoher 1, 1977 



















Total per 


School 


Grade 


Boys 


Girls 


4 Total 


School 


HARTWELL- 


















SMITH 


Kdg. 
Sp. 


19" 

2 


•(1) 


21 
1 


(7) 


40 
3 


(8) 






1 


36 


(4) 


39 


(7) 


75 


(ID 






2 


44 


(8) 


40 


(6) 


84 


(14) 






3 


37 


(5) 


38 


(10) 


75 


(15) 






4 


34 


(7) 


46 


(7) 


80 


(14) 






5 


52 


(7) 


53 


(8) 


105 


(15) 








224 


(32) 


238 


(45) 


462 


(77) 


462 


BROOKS 


6 


32 


(6) 


37 


(5) 


69 


(11) 






7 


40 


(4) 


40 


(8) 


80 


(12) 






8 


44 


(3) 


44 


(5) 


88 


(8) 








116 


(13) 


121 


(18) 


237 


(31) 


237 












Total Lincoln 


699 



All numbers in ( ) are Metco children and are already included 
in figures. 



HANSCOM 
PRIMARY 



HANSCOM 
MIDDLE 



40 

44 

32 

33 

149 



27 
34 
36 
36 
33 
166 



40 


80 




33 


77 




38 


70 




31 
142 


64 
291 


291 


25 


52 




24 


58 




31 


67 




32 


68 




34 
146 


67 
312 


312 




Total Hanscom 


603 



GRAND TOTAL FOR ALL SCHOOLS 



1,302 



188 






REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan W. Wofford, Chairman 
Ronald L. Blecher, Vice-Chairman 
Richard F. Brooks 
Richard H. Davison 
David M. Ford 
Dante Germanotta 

David L. Levington, Superintendent 

The twenty-first report of the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School 
Committee reflects a year filled with criticism, reflection, and re- 
examination. 

The death of Judy Belfrey in Boston in June and the review of the 
Alternate Semester Program; the six months or more of meetings and 
listening surrounding the so-called Gearheart petition asking for a 
return to a schedule of 50-minute periods and mandatory study halls; 
the year- long activity surrounding the 10-year evaluation of the New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges -- all of these major 
events have caused the School Committee and administration to pause, 
reflect, and re-examine the major principles on which the school has 
proceeded for the past decade. 

Judy Belfrey' s murder in Boston a week following the conclusion 
of the Alternate Semester Program in which she had lived and worked 
in Boston placed the school in a period of mourning for her and for 
her family's loss. The Committee's review of Alternate Semester, 
attended by more than 100 citizens, most of them parents whose children 
had experienced Alternate Semester, convinced us that this was a pro- 
gram with unique benefits which far outweigh the risks for those who 
chose, with their parents' permission and payments, to become a part 
of it. 

Over the summer of 1977, Vernon Gearheart and other concerned 
citizens drafted a petition about scheduling, in support of which 
they obtained 1700 signatures. This petition was presented to the 
Committee in late September. Two major hearings were held on the 



189 



petition, one a regular School Committee meeting attended by approx- 
imately 500 citizens, the second organized by the League of Women 
Voters with almost the same turnout. Other meetings also were held: 

Approximately 50 faculty members came before the Committee to 
stress their concerns about the petition and their support of the 
present system. They also presented a letter endorsed by nearly all 
of the faculty. 

Approximately 50 graduates of LSRHS attended a meeting of the 
School Committee and voiced their support of the present system. 

The Student Senate developed, distributed, and collated a student 
questionnaire. They also developed a petition of support signed by 
about 2000 citizens and students. 

Forty members of the faculty spent a day during the Christmas 
holidays and another day during a weekend attempting to develop al- 
ternative scheduling systems for consideration and decision by the 
School Committee during the month of January 1978. 

These have constituted some part of the effort the Committee 
and others have made to honor the petitioners' requests and to see 
them in the context of some of the long-standing issues surrounding 
Lincoln-Sudbury's implementation of its philosophy of individualiza- 
tion and flexibility. 

These are not new issues and concerns. The citizen-school Task 
Forces created in the spring of 1975 focused on many of them in ex- 
amining the issues of Graduation Requirements, Student Behavioral 
and Academic Expectations, the Departmental Offerings, Hall Kids, 
the Scheduling System, and Assessment. The six reports of those 
Task Forces have been evaluated and more than 100 recommendations 
implemented. Yet the questions represented by those reports persist 
and suggest a move away from the emphases of the 1960 's towards con- 
cern with rigor and discipline. 

Those continuing concerns are further exacerbated by a new con- 
text of scarcity in which schools must operate. That context of 
scarcity includes declining enrollments, rising costs, increasing 
complexity in viewpoints and laws, declining public support for edu- 
cation, rising student concern with their economic futures, and in- 
creasing teacher anxiety in the face of RIF (reduction in force) . 
All of these factors become powerful forces in polarizing constituent 
viewpoints and creating dissension. 

It was with a sense of some of these forces on the horizon that 
the School Committee in 1974 undertook, with the financial support 



190 



of the National Institute of Education, the study Declining Enroll- 
ments/Rising School Costs , which was published in July, 1977. That 
study, copies of which are available from the Superintendent's off- 
ice and in the town libraries, examines the forces of scarcity at 
work and predicts some of the consequences with which the Committee 
is currently coping. 

Within this context of increasing complexity and declining 
resources, the school has prepared for its 10-year evaluation by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The most 
public aspect of the multiple activities which comprise this evalu- 
ation has been the publication and dissemination of a revised state- 
ment of LSRHS philosophy. Prepared by a committee of citizens and 
faculty, the statement was publicly discussed, revised and issued 
in August, 1977, after a copy of the draft had been mailed to every 
home in both towns. 

It appears from its acceptability that citizens generally agree 
with the school's philosophy and objectives. This agreement, how- 
ever, does not appear to extend to the program the school has devel- 
oped in addressing that philosophy. The theme for continuing in- 
stitutional re-examination is to determine the extent to which cit- 
izen and parental concerns focus on our failure to practice what we 
preach or on the unexpected consequences of our successfully putting 
our philosophy into practice. 

In our continuing attempt to understand that discrepancy be- 
tween acceptance of our philosophy and criticism of our practice, 
the Committee has greatly missed the participation of Henry Morgan. 
After 14 years of service on the Committee, Henry has retired. His 
capacity for framing issues in their larger contexts, for addressing 
tough problems with directness, humor, and tact, for bringing di- 
verse perspectives to bear, for continually seeking to learn and for 
creating the conditions in which others could learn -- all of these 
gifts have been missed by all members of the School Community. How- 
ever, the Committee has been fortunate in the 1977 re-election to a 
one-year term of Dante Germanotta, who was appointed in November 
1976 to fill Cameron Eiseman's unexpired term, and in the election 
of Richard Brooks to a three-year term. 

A number of other events and activities ought to be noted. 

- LSRHS 's academic program continues to be strong and our 
graduates widely accepted in colleges and universities, 
as is noted elsewhere in this report. 

- The attendance procedures of the school have been revised 
to include stricter reporting practices and penalties. 

- The School Committee adopted a policy to place school-wide 



191 



emphasis on the improvement of writing. 

- English 9 is currently being offered to talented students 
at Brooks and Curtis Junior High Schools, permitting stu- 
dents to undertake more advanced work. 

- Project Advance, a college credit course in English, has 
been instituted for talented high school students in con- 
junction with Syracuse University. 

- The Drama Group paid a return visit to Manchester Grammar 
School in England where they performed The Crucible. 

- Donald March, the founder of the Lincoln-Sudbury Civic 
Orchestra, retired after many years of outstanding service 
to the region. We shall miss him. 

- A one-credit service requirement has been added to the 
school's graduation requirements, for which all students 
must contribute 20 hours of service to the School and/or 
the communities. 

Ralph Brooks has replaced Anne Mahaney as the Business Manager 
of the school. 



As we review this list of changes and continued strengths, we 
hope that during the coming year we will be able to bring sufficient 
resolution to the current tensions that divide the school and the 
communities so that we can once again restore a balance between fo- 
cusing on positive achievements and attempting to be open to appro- 
priate criticisms. 



192 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 

The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the 
elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on March 28, 1977, and certifications 
of the results were received from Elizabeth Snelling, Town Clerk of 
Lincoln, and Betsey M. Powers, Town Clerk of Sudbury, as follows: 





Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Total 


Three-year terra 






Richard F. Brooks 


204 


1,942 


2,146 


Richard H. Davison 


651 


1,603 


2,254 


Cyrus H. Kano 


1,070 


945 


2,015 


Allan C. Morgan 


165 


1,790 


1,955 


Blanks 


438 


754 


1,192 


One-year term 








Dante Germanotta 


633 


1,335 


1,968 


Bernard J. Hennessey 


211 


1,697 


1,908 


Blanks 


420 


485 


905 



Frank Heys, District Secretary 



193 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1977 



Thomas Adametz 

Leo J. Algeo, Jr. 

Mark W. Allen 

Deborah L. Alleyne 

John R. Allison 

David Paul Alsen 

Craig C. Anderson 

Jo Ann Anderson 

Lynne Elisabeth Anderson 

Marie C. Andrew 

Susan M. Andrews 

Selene Angell 

Frederick P. Armstrong, IV 

Rebekah L. Armstrong 

Keith W. Austen 

John F. Austin 

Joseph L. Baber 

Karl M. Bacon 

Elaine M. Bailey 

Andrea A. Baldi 

Marie E. Bankuti 

Patricia Barkas 

Martha J. Bart let t 

Kevin Dale Bauder 

Richard Thomas Bean 

Katrin M. Beard 

Scott Beers 

Lisa A. Beers 

Faye Elizabeth Belcastro 

Katherine A. Bell 

Margaret Miller Bell 

James B. Bender 

Bradford Benedict 

David J. Bentley 

Diane Berckman 

Eric J. Berger 

William R. Bernetich 

Mark G. Bishop 

Robert William Bleakney 



Ellen C. Bluver 
Thomas W. Bolster 
Gail C. Bonia 
Wendy Boynton 
Laurie Sue Branche 
*Sarah S. Brannen 
Linda A. Brevik 
Glee Ellen Brewster 
David I. Brond 
Eric W. Brooks 
Charles S. Brown 
Amy Catherine Browning 
Colm S. Bruce 
Nicholas I. Buchan 
Valerie L. Bundley 
Arnett R. Burdette 
Jane Claire Burgarella 
Susan Scott Butler 

Carles E. Cabral 
Derwin E. Cain 
Maria Jo Caira 
Linda Calandrella 

* Jonathan D. Calder 
Charles W. Calkins 
E. Douglas Campbell 
Marshall Scott Cane 
Eric W. Caplan 
Barbara A. Carroll 
Arthur Boyce Champeny 
John Chase 
Timothy Chase 
David Alan Cheever 
Geoffrey C. Cheney 
Paul Martin Chetham 
Steven Thomas Chetham 
Cynthia Clagett 
Alison F. Clark 
Doreen Joy Clark 

*Lisa K. Clark 



194 



Linda A. Clausen 
Sandra Clemens 
Jennifer Elizabeth Clementi 
W. Lee Cleveland, Jr. 
Susan Elizabeth Coan 
Mary Faye Colby 
Bradford D. Com jean 
Edward Connors 
Judith Crawford Coolidge 
Laurie Jean Copeland 
Jacqueline C. Corcoran 
Kevin P. Cosgrove 
Stephen D. Coutts 
Richard Cox 
Carol Meridith Craig 
William R. Cummings, Jr. 
Carey Curran 
*Susan Mary Curt in 
Stephen L. Curtis 
Darryl S. Cutter 

Brien Daniels 

Paula Frances Darcy 

Marcel la Dardani 

Philip E. Davidson 

Richard G. Davin 
*Barbara Diane DeBaryshe 

George M. Derderian 

Linda Maria DeRosa 

Richard P. Devlin 

James S. Dickey 

Peter M. Dickie 

Linda Lee Dickson 

David E. Donnellan 

Paul Daniel Dorian 

Jill Diane Doyle 

Rebecca J. Driscoll 
*David H. Drum 

Mary E. Dyer 

Gayle Elizabeth Dyment 

Nancy E. Edmonds 
Florence H. Edwards 
Cameron H. Eiseman, Jr. 
Jennifer W. Elder 
Mark Elliott 
James Howard Epstein 



Cindy Erdle 
Karen Ericson 

George E. Fales 

John Falzone 

Victoria E. Farmer 

Julie Marie Farrell 

Cynthia C. Fausch 

David M. Felleman 

Susan Felleman 

Inga Fenijn 

Sara A. Finan 

Susan Elizabeth Finelli 

Dana T. Finerty 

John W. Fitzgerald 

Michael Thomas Fitzgibbons 

April Suzanne Ford 

Lisa Jane Ford 

Mary Ellen Frazer 

Andrea Marie Fredella 

Carol Rae Fryer 

Peter Fuller 

Anne-Marie Gearheart 
Tracy Genova 
John M. Germanotta 
Michael J. Getz 
Ana Silvana Giner 
Robin E. Gitlin 
Bradley William Glaser 
Cheryl A. Gold 
Cheryl Gosman 
Robert A. Gottberg 
Aaron David Graham 
Richard G. Grant 
Robert Douglas Green 
Linda L. Greene 
Theodore Roy Greenleaf 
r Jay Steven Gregory 
Robert Winslow Grellier 
Brian P. Griffin 
Gregory M. Grinnell 
Andrew B. Grossman 
Peter H. Guder 
David Meyer Gursky 
Cheryl Gustafson 



195 



Thomas 0. Haeberer 

James L. Hall 

Thomas Eugene Hall 

Karen J. Hal let t 

Nora M. Halligan 

Mark W. Hannon 

Thomas Hannon 

Robin Hanson 

Steven N. Hanson 

Herbert L. Hardy, Jr. 

George Hartogensis 
* Brian D. Harvey 

Robert F. Hatch 

Jennifer Lynn Hawes 

Judith Ellen Hawley 

Amy J. Hayes 

Valerie D. Haynes 

Harry Manuel Hay t ay an, Jr, 

William Henchy 

Edward K. Hibben 

Peter Hill 

Cynthia L. Hitchcock 

Bruce E. Hollander 

Bruce C. Hollocher 

Kathi Eleanor Hoops 

Pamela B. Howard 

Stephen W. Howard 

Ann Elizabeth Huffman 

Kathleen J. Huie 

Mark B. Humphrey 
*Amy Lisa Hurwitz 

Bradley C. Irish 
Robert C. Irminger 
Stephen Goodhue Ives 



Joyce Elizabeth Keeman 
David James Keevil 
Susan J. Kelley 
Francis J. Kelly 
Karen M. Kennedy 
James F. Kern 
Kevin Patrick Kern 
Peter A. Kerrebrock 
Thomas Paul Kevorkian 
Christopher M. Keyes 
George Henry Kiesewetter 
Jeffrey J. Kirk 
John J. Kirk 
James J. Kopp 
Mary Ellen Kuras 

Anthony L. Lainez 
Peter T. Lambie 
John A. Lamore 
Stephen Langford 
Deborah Langway 
Alicia Lee 

Kristen Anne Lenington 
Joseph P. Lettery 
Marcy Clair Levington 
Brian Lewis 
Cynthia Elaine Lewis 
Pamela Libman 
Patti Libman 
John Linnell 
*Judith Corinne Liu 
Sandra Loynd 
Frank DeCosta Lucas 
Thomas K. Lynch 
Kelly L. Lynch 



Catherine Whitney Janes 
Gregory H. Johnson 
Lauren C. Johnson 
Stephen Senter Johnson 

Steven B. Kahn 
Mark T. Kail berg 
Thomas W. Kane 
*Susan Leslie Kano 
Jan Ellen Kaufmann 
Michael J. Kaupp 
John P. Keane 



Celia A. MacKinnon 
Jane Marie MacKinnon 
Robert W. MacMillan 
David Ma f era 
Carol J. Mailhot 
John Ma lone 
Michael P. Malone 
^William Francis Maloney 
Alex G. Manfredi 
Timothy J. Mangini 
Ronald G. Marchessault 
Maryann H. Marinozzi 



196 



John Keith Markley 

Lisa J. Maroni 

Nancy Lynn Martin 

Donna M. Martinec 

Christine Dorothy Martinelli 

Stephanie A. Mascoll 

Alexa K. Mason 

Ellen L. May 

Robert C. May, Jr. 

Katherine E. McCabe 

Sheila M. McCusker 

Bonnie Jean McElvery 

Mary C. McGovern 

Kevin M. Mc Knight 

Susan D. McNally 
* Kevin M. McNamara 

Sharon Marie McNamara 

Sheila Marie McNamara 

Christopher T. McNulty 

Diane McQuiston 

Marie W. Mealey 

Matthew Mele 

Thomas Mellish 
*Katherine M. Merra 

Michael F. Merra 

Stephen F. Michels 

Gregg Thomas Mikoski 

Charles F. Miller 

Heather Ann Mohr 

Ellen Monahan 

Michael P. More 

Diane W. Morgan 

Laura Lee Morgan 

Maureen Morrissey 
*Sarah E. Morse 

Susan Kay Moses 

James W. Munsey 

Bruce M. Nagle 
Robert Nawoichik 
Thomas E. Nee Ion 
Elizabeth P. Neiley 
Blake Eugene Nelson 
John H. Nicholas 
Susan Lawson Nichols 
Jeffrey Nix 
Jill Ann Noyes 



Steven P. Nurney 

Michael S. O'Connell 
Susan O'Connor 
William R. O'Loughlin 
Jeanne Lorraine O'Reilly 
Brian O'Shea 
Kathy S. Ovian 

Cheryl Pace 

Diana Paine 

Peter W. Palmer 
*Todd W. Paro 

Karen Parr 

Laura Jean Perry 
*Lisa M. Peters 

Amy R. Pickett 

Janet A. Pillion 

Richard Alan Pillion 

Kenneth Pino 

Edward D. Piscitelli 

Karen F. Pollens 

Kathy Polutchko 

Robyn L. Pomerantz 

Dirk Daniel Poole 

Stephen M. Porter 

Susan R. Porter 

Christopher D. Post 

Robert Scott Poulin 

Deborah Anne Powell 

Kathy S. Prager 

Jeanne L. Propsma 

Lisa Ann Putukian 

Sharon M. Quinton 

John B. Rand 

Douglas Coffin Reichenberg 

James K. Reid 

David R. Riggert 

David G. Risch 

Melvin Robinson 

Stephen Roche 

Andrea Jean Roessler 

Chester L. Rose 

Annemarie F. Rosenheim 

Ellen Christine Ross 



197 



*James E. Ross 
Neal Russell 
Robert P. Russes 

Arthur R. Sabbag 
Amy S. Sackman 
Bette C. Saraglow 
Anthony E. J. Saunders 
Joan Bradford Saunders 
Susan Savoy 
Steven Schiffman 
Dawn K. Schneider 
Kenneth E. Schow 
Jonathan Harrison Schroeder 
Angela E. Seaton 
Kim M. Sedzia 
Ann L. Seymour 
George R. Sharkey 
David A. Sherman 
Jayne L. Siegel 
Jane Marie Sifferlen 
Joanne Mary Signa 
Thomas Gerard Signa 
Sally Ann Sims 
Odile C. Skarnes 
Albert P. Skavicus 
Kenneth Small 
Robert H. Smart 
*Christopher L. Smith 
Douglas W. Smith 
Carrie Lynn Snyder 
Robert F. Snyder 
Steven A. Snyder 
Cheryl-Marie Somers 
Patricia J. Sottile 
Laura Susie Soule 
Daniel Spock 
David H. Stearns 
Edward J. Stearns 
Kenneth D. Stearns 
Herbert A. Stebbins, III 
Paul A. Steltzer 
Steven M. Stocking 
Anne Stone 
Joe Streater 
Ellen E. Striker 
Barbara Sullivan 



Richard Sullivan 
Bradley Summers 
Robert C. Summers, Jr. 
Lynn Susman 
Jennifer Anne Swain 
* Barbara Williamson Swart z 

*Steven P. Tate 
Michael A. Teabo 
Bernice F. Tetreault 
Lauren T. Tetreault 
Denise C. Theodores 
Lori Ann Thomas 
Annette Kim Thompson 
Peter P. Thomson 
Richard L. Tichnor 
Foss P. Tighe 
Ann-Rochelle Tingey 
Pamela G. Todd 
Karen E. Topham 
Theodore R. Treadwell, III 
Lynne Ann Trocchi 
Robert Paul Troisi 
David Michael Turner 
Russell Turner 



*Jacqueline M. van Tol 
Mark A. Verhey 
Norma Jean Vinciulla 
Wolfram H. Volpi 
Stephen F. Vorderer 

Janet Harriette Wagner 
Eric M. Waldman 
Gerald R. Waldman 
Amy M. Wales 
Holly B. Wales 
Rachel L. Wales 
Christopher John Walker 
Patrick Joseph Wallace 
James W. Walsh 
Cynthia Marie Ward 
Thomas Dillingham Ward, 
Wendy L. Wamshuis 
Traci L. Watson 
Bruce E. Weissman 
Marie A. Wemett 



Jr 



198 



Richard 0, West, Jr. 
Diane M, Whitcomb 
Constance N, White 
John D. Whynot 
Elizabeth A. Wilkins 
Donna J, Wilkinson 
David B, Williams 
Cheryl ann Wilson 
John G. Wilson, Jr. 
Jane Winchell 
Paul Francis Wirzburger 
Stephen M, Wiseman 
* Barbara Jean Woo 
Paula K. Wurlitzer 

Kenneth W. Yarbrough 
John Barry Yorston 
Andrew Young 



Cum Laude 



199 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
AS OF OCTOBER 1, 1977 



Lincoln 
Sudbury 

METCO (Tuition) 
Other Tuition 

Total 



1973 



1959 



1974 



1964 



1975 



1919 



1976 



1813 



1977 



387 


373 


340 


305 


290 


1516 


1513 


1487 


1414 


1343 


42 


64 


78 


85 


85 


14 


14 


14 


3 


11 



1729 



Boys 
Girls 



Total 



990 


970 


926 


867 


824 


969 


994 


993 


946 


905 



1959 



1964 



1919 



1813 



1729 



9th Grade 
10th Grade 
11th Grade 
12th Grade 
Post Graduate 
Ungraded 

Total 



515 


476 


470 


394 


411 


512 


501 


480 


459 


400 


495 


497 


476 


479 


442 


437 


489 


491 


474 


467 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


7 


7 



1959 



1964 



1919 



1813 



1729 



Tuition Pupils 
Attending Other 
Schools 



13 



21 



13 



31 



27 



200 



rj- CD 




CM CM 

cm cm 


in 


oc 
00 










CD 



CM CM 




CM CM 

CM Tj- 


JCM O 


CM CM 
CM 


i— i i— t 


CM 


o o 
ito c 



tO |00 



r- 1 f-H r- LO « 



NO 


c 


CM 


CD 


o 


CM O 


00 IrH 


r- 


o 


00 


t^ 


to 


LO O 


o |lo 


0) 


O 










• | • 


- 1 




o 


r^ 


1-1 


i-t C 


"IK 


ti- 


c_ 












o 














w, 














oo 














0] 


• 


-H 


v£> 


vO 


r- o 


10 ilo 


1—4 


o 


00 


to 






& 


u 


2 


(M 








!»o 













u 




cm lo to 
vc vo r- 


to 


LO 


2 


CD o 
Tf o 


G 
M 


00 ^H 


■"< 




■*r 


r- o 

cm o 






tO CD t^ CM (A 

i— i CM vO Jh 

I— i tT fl) 

ja 

6 

E 









LO 


c 


cd to 


O 


00 O 


LO 


in 


1— 






r^ 


o 


cd TJ- 


o 


m cd 


r-< O 


o 






<d 


o 








• [ • 


I— 1 






l—l 


b 


m r-- 


o 


i— i 


to \<T. 


cc 








CD 


v£> 






|r~- 


h- 






u- 


a 










OO 






o 












I— 1 


















Q 




C 


to 

«0 












_l 


c 


o 


re 




to to 


o 


r- "V 


rrl^i 


c 


CJ3 


•H 


.— < 


c 


CD to 






Hlrt 


o 




4-> 


u 


2 


CM 






|to 


3C 


CO 


CTJ 












o 


UJ 


u 












t/> 


»— 


3 
"3 












-J 


ZD 


LU 


4-> 










<£ 


Q 




•^r 


C 


to -3- 


vO 


CM vD 


r»- 


oc 


Z 


<C 


X 


r-- 


o 


O to 


r^ 


lo r- 


r^ 


J— I 


o 


oc: 


V. 


cd 


o 














e> 


re 


i— i 


h 


cm r^ 




i— i 


i— t 


■^r 


o 




T3 




CD 


vO 








r-- 


LU 


or 


C 


Ct_ 


Cu 










ex. 


o 


o 
u 


O 












>~ 




CD 


to 












CCL 


UJ 


to 


to 












ZD 


cc 




re 




LO CD 


to 


vO to 


t^ Ito 


cc 


UJ 


■M 


i-H 


O 


Tj- CM 






ai 


Q 


3= 


to 


u 


2 


CM 






|CM 


Z3 


3 


o 












C/> 




Cl, 












Z 
















_J 






-M 










o 






to 


C 


o to 


vO 


rf \0 


■^r 


to 


o 






r-- 


o 


00 .-■ 


O 


>-> ^t 


i— i 


r>- 


2: 






CD 


a 












•— i 






■— i 


u 


rf CD 


CM 


i— ( 


i— i 


oc 


_i 








o 


LO 








vC 








cw 


pv. 
















O 


















to 


















to 


















re 




O O 


CD 


lO CM 


LO |<— 1 








i— < 





TJ- T3- 






P 








u 


2 


CM 








to 



to o c w 

cd o o a> 

• • o 

c o -o -H 

CM O CO •*-> 

H M (J 

C5 re 

to ^r <u tsc 

a. ^t m c 



CM O 

oc o 



LO O - T3 
CM O to -H 

re <u 
a> 4-> 



•3- CM LO (A 

|hm o, 

•H 
> ■ 

a> 

i- 



or. 



l-l ^ ^H 



r- oo 
to to 

|i-H ^f 



re 



to 

O 

•dco re 

GO t— ( O <D 

CD O GO U 

T3 O 0) O 

•> &C.-1 CO 

Jh C O -■*. V> 

re -h u to ^-, 

CU 4-> tO O 

x c ^ <u o 

re o c x 

{_, fn -H -H (J 

3 GO C W to 

O 3D 

LL. ^ 00 



U o 
O ■•-• to 



a> go J-. 
Vh 3 
&- 2 



<u 

•H i—l 

— • o 
re o 

■H X 
CJ o 

a. 
to 



a 

3 
U 

u 

c 



-a x 
<u u 

x re •— i 

O+J-D J) 

i-H -H <t) > 

p.-h > re 

6 -h o U 



u re 

c c 

•H O 

J -r-l 

GO 

O CD 

-m a: 

GO X 

C Vh 

•h 3 

C X) 

Vi T3 

3 3 

+J CO 
CD 



re cd 

CD 4-» 

Q O 



c 
oc 



201 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977 



Total cash balance, July 1, 1976 

District Fund 
Cash balance, July 1, 1976 



Receipts: 

Lincoln Assessment 

Sudbury Assessment 

State Reimbursement 
Building construction 
Transportation 
Regional aid 
Chapter 766 

Investments 

Revenue-Miscellaneous 

Petty cash returns 

Tailings 

Transfer from P. L. 874 

Deduction Accounts: 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Federal Withholding Tax 
Mass. Withholding Tax 
Teachers' Assn, 
Disability Insurance #1 
Disability Insurance #2 
Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Credit Union 
United Way 
Adjustment 



Disbursements: 
Operating budget 
Debt Service - Interest 

- Principal 
Investments 

Building Construction #4 
Building Construction #5 
Outlay 

Community Service 
Petty Cash Advances 
Tailings 
Deduction Accounts: 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
Teachers ' Ret irement 



$ 665,206.27 
2,957,644.52 

300,490.01 

195,956.00 

264,206.70 

164,651.00 

4,500,000.00 

141,452.00 

750.00 

13.50 

14,188.00 



34,599.40 
119,391.46 

26,263.57 
467,565.75 
130,108.72 

11,148.88 

16,456.39 
637.92 

43,664.28 

121,595.00 

402.04 



208.05 



4,148,536.28 

114,262.50 

410,000.00 

4,250,000.00 

17,268.08 

00.00 

68,547.45 

1,531.83 

750.00 

317.52 



$ (22,333.36) 



(108,414.44) 



9,204,558.00 



971.833.41 



208.05 
10,176,599.46 
10,068,185.02 



9,011,213.66 



33,341.34 
119,391.46 



202 



County Retirement $ 26,263.57 

Federal Withholding Tax 467,565.75 

Mass. Withholding Tax 130,108.72 

Teachers' Assn. 11,148.88 

Disability Insurance #1 16,013.96 

Disability Insurance #2 637.62 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 41,030.62 

Credit Union 121,595.00 

United Way 395.54 $ 967,492.46 

9,978,706.12 

Cash Balance June 30, 1977 $ 89,478.90 



P. L. 874 

Cash balance, July 1, 1976 $ 26,115.00 

Receipts 20,837.41 

46,952.41 

Disbursements 14,188.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 $ 32,764.41 

METCO 

Cash balance, July 1, 1976 $ 7,962.45 

Receipts 219,623.00 

227,585.45 

Disbursements 218,195.37 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 $ 9,390.08 

PROJECT SPACE 

Cash balance, July 1, 1976 $ 1,000.00 

Receipts 54,750.00 

55,750.00 

Disbursements 55,250.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 $ 500.00 

TITLE II SPECIA L PURPOSE 

Cash balance, July 1, 1976 

Receipts 

Disbursements 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 $ 291.75 

TITLE II LIBRARY 1976 

Cash balance, July 1, 1976 $ 00.00 

Receipts 1,446.69 

1,446.69 

Disbursements 1,446.69 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 $ 00.00 



291 


75 


00 


00 


00 


00 



203 



TITLE I 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$ 00.00 
3,714.00 
3,714.00 
3,714.00 

$ 00.00 



NIE G-74-0033 SCHOOL COMMITTEE GRANT 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$ 6,081.05 

00.00 

6,081.05 

6,089.02 

T779T) 



CAFETERIA 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$21,412.38 
167,053.27 
188,465.65 
158,576.56 
$29,889.09 



ATHLETIC FUND 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$ 77.40 
6,621.70 
6,699.10 
4,405.50 

$ 2,293.60 



ADULT EDUCATION 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$ 4,497.83 
23,366.40 
27,864.23 
23,333.56 

$ 4,530.67 



LIBRARY FUND 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$ 260.00 

10.00 

270.00 

00.00 

$ 270.00 



NURSERY SCHOOL 



Cash balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance June 30, 1977 



$10,684.40 
14,213.60 
24,898.00 
18,251.82 

$ 6,616.18 



204 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash balance July 1, 1976 $ 7,698.82 

Receipts 6,764,36 

14,463.18 

Disbursements 869.26 

Cash balance June 30, 1977 $13,593.92 

Total cash balance June 30, 1977 $189,610.63 



205 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



BALANCE SHEET 



June 30, 1977 



ASSETS 



The First National Bank of Boston 

Bay Bank/Newton- Waltham 

Concord Cooperative Bank 

Bond - State of Israel 

Certificate of Deposit - First National 



144,385.66 

31,361.05 

13,593.92 

270.00 

350,000.00 

$ 539,610.63 



LIABILITIES 6 RESERVES 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Tailing 

Surplus Revenue 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Disability Insurance #1 

Disability Insurance #2 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

United Way 

Building Construction #4 

Building Construction #5 

P. L. 874 

Metco 

Project SPACE 

Title II Special Purpose 

Nursery School 

NIE School Committee Grant 

Cafeteria 

Athletic Fund 

Adult Education 

Library Fund 

Scholarship Fund 



$ 107,327.68 

13.50 

318,084.29 

3,458.67 

2,308.14 

107.14 

6,626.66 

6.50 

670.72 

875.60 

32,764.41 

9,390.08 

500.00 

291.75 

6,616.18 

(7.97) 

29,889.09 

2,293.60 

4,530.67 

270.00 

13,593.92 

$ 539,610.63 



Outstanding Debt 



3.7% School Bonds payable $ 50,000, May 1, 

3.1% School Bonds payable $100,000, Feb. 

4.0% School Bonds payable $ 25,000, Aug. 

$ 20,000, Aug. 

4.5% School Bonds payable $220,000, Aug. 

6.5% School Bonds payable $ 15,000, Aug. 





1978-80 


1 


1978-85 


1 


1977-83 


1 


1984-86 


1 


1977-82 


I, 


1977-84 



$ 150,000.00 
800,000.00 

235,000.00 

1,320,000.00 

120,000.00 

$2,625,000.00 



George B. Flint, Treasurer 



206 



STUDENT EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 
Jeanne M. Maloney, Chairman 



The Student Exchange Committee exists to promote international 
understanding and to foster proficiency in foreign languages. As 
our Ambassadors benefit from living abroad so their classmates gain 
from the Foreign Students who come to study at Lincoln-Sudbury. 

Eight students were sent abroad as Ambassadors in the 19th 
year of the Student Exchange Program: Eve Buckler, Brazil; Gregg 
Burgess, El Salvador; John Flansburgh, Great Britain; Honor Fuller- 
ton, Belgium; Lisa Freed, Mexico; Ann Gail, France; Beth Neal, Japan; 
and Katherine Sykes, Switzerland. Attending the Cheadle Hulme 
School in England for the school year 1977-78 is Jenny Swain. 

A Teacher-Ambassador was also co-sponsored by the SEC and the 
L-S Teachers Association. Ms. Paula Wolfe studied and traveled 
throughout the Scandinavian countries. 

Five Foreign Students attended the Regional and lived with 
Lincoln-Sudbury families: Rose Dastmalchi, Iran; Camilla Ekholm, 
Sweden; Gerry Esquival, Philippines; Patricia Marquez, El Salvador; 
and Jan Rotnes, Norway. 



207 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Charles E. Courtright Acton 

Rico A. Merluzzo, Chairman Arlington 

Henry L. Hall, Jr. Belmont 

John J. Shimkus Boxborough 

Kenneth L. Bilodeau Carlisle 

Kenneth Marriner, Jr. Concord 

Robert C. Jackson Lexington 

Ruth W. Wales, Vice-Chairman Lincoln 

George G. Cormier, Secretary Stow 

Thomas A. Welch Sudbury 

Frederick L. Heinrich Wayland 

Annette DiStefano Weston 

Ronald J. Fitzgerald, Superintendent-Director 



Now in its fourth year of operation, Minuteman Regional Voca- 
tional Technical School is continuing to expand the services it is 
providing for thousands of junior and senior high school students 
and adults, town officials, business and industry in its 12 district 
towns. 

During 1977 -- 

-- 1202 high school students received job training as well 
as an academic education during the regular day program 
at Minuteman. 

-- 52 adults from the district took advantage of Minuteman' s 
offer to let them receive job training on a space avail- 
able basis in the regular day program. (This did not 
involve any additional cost to the school since the 
adults were only placed in shops where there was space 
and no extra teachers were hired.) 

-- 726 junior and senior high school students from public 
and private schools in the district came to Minuteman 
after school two days a week to receive hands-on exper- 
ience in the school's 26 shops and learn about a variety 
of occupations . 

-- 283 adults and older students received job training 
through Minuteman ' s new Regional Occupational Program 



208 



(ROP) , set up in cooperation with local businesses. 

-- 979 adults took courses in Minuteman 1 s Adult Education 
Program and Middlesex Community College began offering 
courses four nights a week at Minuteman. 

-- 300 familes and individuals used Minuteman 1 s swimming 
pool regularly on weekends and several evenings a week 
through membership in a self-supporting swim club. 
Recreation departments and high schools from the 12 towns 
also used the pool for special programs and swim team 
practice sessions. 

-- 87 organizations used Minuteman 1 s facilities (12 of these 
on a regular basis) resulting in use of the building by 
two or more outside groups every evening during the week 
for the entire 1977 school year. 

Learning to deal with the public is an important part of the 
education of all Minuteman students. This ties in perfectly with 
the school's philosophy of public service. Hundreds of people from 
surrounding communities visit the school every day, year round, to 
take advantage of a restaurant, shopping mall, beauty shop, nursery 
school, service station, auto body shop, printing shop, bakery, flow- 
er shop and catering service all run by Minuteman students and open 
to the public. 

During 1977 -- 

-- 22,000 people visited the Fife and Drum Restaurant and 
shopping Mall. 

-- Minuteman graphic arts students produced hundreds of 
design and printing jobs for schools, town departments 
and non-profit organizations in district towns. 

-- auto body students completely rejuvenated a fire truck 
for the town of Lincoln. 

-- health occupations students in the Community Service 
Aide program spent four mornings a week assisting senior 
citizens at Greeley and Vynebrook Villages in Lexington 
with shopping and also providing home care and working 
on craft projects with them. 

-- carpentry students made signs for the Boxborough Town 



209 



Hall and for Troop A Headquarters of the Massachusetts 
State Police. They also built a conference table for 
the Belmont Town Hall and built new mounts for one of 
the cannons in front of the Belmont Town Hall 1976. 

r 

Minuteman will graduate its first class in June, 1978, providing J 
area business and industry with a large group of skilled potential 
employees. During 1977 fifty- five Minuteman seniors began working 
off campus through the school's cooperative work experience program. 
This program makes it possible for seniors to work in the field for 
which they are being trained full-time every other week during the 
time these students would normally be in their vocational shops. In f 
this way, two students working full-time during alternate weeks equal j 
one full-time employee for a company. 

Many of the students now on coop will continue working for 
their present employers after graduation. The other Minuteman 
graduates who do not plan to go on to college or some other form of 
advanced training will be assisted in finding jobs by Minuteman' s 
Work Experience Coordinator. It is expected that more than 90 per- 
cent of Minuteman' s June 1978 graduates will be placed in jobs, con- 
tinue their education or enter the military. 

Minuteman 's services to its own students have also expanded in 
other ways. 

During 1977 -- 

-- new programs in art, music, photography, plastics and 
packaging were added to the curriculum. The packaging 
technology program was set up in cooperation with the 
Package Machine Manufacturers Institute of America and 
is the only program in New England training people to 
repair and install packaging machinery. As a result 
there will be many jobs awaiting graduates of this 
program. 

--a new Math Lab was opened to help students with a his- 
tory of failure in math by offering them a variety of 
teaching materials and methods to help them master the 
basics. 

-- increased services were offered to students and staff 
by the school's library and audio visual department. 
(One of the requirements for graduation from Minuteman 
is proficiency in library skills.) 



210 



-- a new Career Center was opened by the Guidance Depart- 
ment for use by Minuteman day students as well as those 
enrolled in after school and evening programs. A key 
element of the Center is a computer terminal linked with 
the New England Occupational Information System which 
provides information concerning schools, financial aid, 
job prospects in various careers and qualifications 
needed to enter these careers. 

-- Minuteman received national recognition on a prime time 
television special for its service to handicapped stu- 
dents. The program was called "Including Me" and was 
shown throughout the United States over the Public 
Broadcasting System. 

Minuteman Tech is proud to be meeting the needs of a growing 
number of people from the 12 communities which built the school. To 
those who have not yet visited the school and taken advantage of the 
many services it offers, an invitation goes out from the staff and 
students. 

The shopping mall is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. daily; the 
Fife and Drum Restaurant is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. 
until 1 p.m. The Beauty Shop Tuesday through Friday from 11:15 a.m. 
until 1:30 p.m. Tours of the building are usually scheduled for 
Fridays, but may be arranged at other times by contacting the Dean 
of Students. 

Included below are financial and enrollment data for 1977. 



211 





s 


o 








o 


HH 








oS 


H 








fcu 


u 
pq 








X 


X 








H 










Z 


o; 








cu 


uj 








Q 


o- 








3 










E- 


•> 








X 










u« 


z 








O 


uj 




z 




a: 


3 




UJ 




uj 


- 




s: 




CQ 


x 




uj 




E 


u- 




UJ 




Z 


c 




3 
< 




UJ 


at: 








X 


uj 




u- 


H 


H 


cc 




O 


u 




2: 






— 


Z 


5 




/ •. 


aC 


o 


z 




u. 


E-« 








N ' 


x 


Q 


j 






►H 


UJ 


< 




> 


Cj 


< 


C 




M 


J 


CQ 


E-« 




z 


c 








o 


c 


00 


UJ 




w 




h«- 


- 




H 


U 


\ E- 




U 


x 


O 






_: 




to 


[L. 




Cfl 


J 


\ O 


H 




< 


\D 




Z 


z 


u 




UJ 


UJ 


O 


i — i 


o 


C3 


^ 




Z 


H 


< 


UJ 


Q 


X 




- 


u 


uj 


u 


t^ 


z 


C£ 


-x 


UJ 


r^ 


UJ 


u 


< 


p 


\ u 


< 


cc 




i-H 


oi 






Z 


•"■^ 


UJ 


u. 


X 


c 


r- 


O- 


o 


E- 


^~ 








X 


H 


os 


< 


, v 


C 


< 


o 




u 


U 


U 


Uh 


Cfl 


1 — ■ 




c 




< 




o 


> 


CO 




> 


z 




E- 


~ 




I— 1 


J 


CO 


\D 




H 


< 


o 


r> 




S 


z 


o 


"^-s 




c 




—1 




UJ 


— 


J 


"V. 




c_ 


o 


< 


O 




3 


cu 


H 


. — i 






3 








►J 




0- 


z 




< 


z 


< 


o 






g 


U 


z 






u: 


Q 






c_ 


H 


Z 


jg 




X 


3 


< 


u 






z 




H 




c£ 


^— 


o 


P 




c 


2: 


z 

l-H 


z 




tu 




H 


S 




E- 




2 


L3 




z 

UJ 




UJ 


z 




s 




a. 


'•—* 




X 




o 


a 

z 




X 
UJ 




cc 


UJ 




X 




o 


E- 




X 




EL, 


E- 
< 




< 




H 










Z 


z 








£ 


2 
C 








CO 


H 








CO 










tu 


=: 








CO 


u 








CO 


< 








< 


UJ 







E- OQ 

l-H UJ 

a- a 

< ^ 



J z 

< >-H 

Ht E- 













v 
















o 
to 
eg 


nO 

O 

to 


O 

to 

CM 


NO 

o> 

00 


NO 
NO 


LO 
CM 


LO 

o 
to 


o 

CM 


o 

00 


CM 
O 


o 

NO 
LO 


CM 


CM 
LO 

o 


LO 

to 


to 

i-H 

o> 


to 

00 
CM 


to 

00 


CM 


i-H 


CM 
LO 


r-t 


r-H 


i—t 

i-H 

to 


CM 
CM 


o 
to 


i-H 


■be- 
























to 
ii 


LO 


00 
LO 

o 




-3- 

LO 


t~o 


LO 
00 


r-- 

LO 
00 


00 
O 

i-H 


00 
LO 


00 
CM 


NO 


i-H 


LO 

o 


CM 

nO 

■6*3- 


o 

I"H 


Oi 




r-- 


o 
to 


NO 

00 


NO 

i— t 


nO 
CM 


LO 
LO 


to 


rfr 


LO 
LO 
LO 

■be- 

+ 


O 


00 

vO 


i—i 

to 

NO 


CM 

cn 


NO 
LO 


NO 

to 


NO 
NO 
NO 


o 

LO 


00 
LO 
O 


"3- 
i-H 

•** 


LO 
00 


LO 

to 

i-H 


LO 

NO 

CM 


to 

i— 1 

■ee- 


LO 
CM 


o 

I— 1 




r-H 


r^ 


to 
to 


CM 


CM 


r-- 


oo 


LO 


O 
CM 

i-H 

■be- 

+ 



LO 


o 


CM 


O 


LO 


"?t 


CM 


00 


^- 


o 


NO 


NO 


CM 


ON 


00 


to 


LO 


CM 


o 


oo 


LO 


LO 


h- 


l-H 


LO 


CM 


^ 


"3- 


i-H 


^t 


r- 


LO 


t^. 


NO 


to 


o 


o 


r-- 


r- 


CM 


nO 


to 


r~- 


to 


r^ 


r-H 


CM 


oT 


o> 


ON 


co 


to 


00 


CM 


CM 


NO 


to 


to 


o> 


r^ 


i-H 


^* 


r- 


CM 


o 


CM 


r- 


CM 






r-H 


to 




r-H 


CM 


i-H 




LO 
CM 


■be- 
























•b9- 


o\° 
























o\° 


LO 


NO 


CM 


"=3- 


r^- 


CM 


00 


CM 


1^- 


00 


O 


Oi 




CT> 


i-H 


i-H 


Oi 


"3- 


On 


^t 


o 


nO 


rf 


LO 


CM 




CM 


O 


Oi 


NO 


to 


rt 


NO 


o> 


r- 


ON 


i-H 


CO 




i-H 


0> 


00 


CM 


i-H 


LO 


LO 


CM 


^r 


ON 


t^ 




O 


r-H 


CM 

z 

o 




X 
X 


UJ 




z 

o 












O 
i-H 




H 


H 


o 


hJ 


Q 


H 


z 




>< 


a 








O 


Z 


os 


X 


OS 


O 


-J 




os 


z 


z 


X 


z 


z 


o 


o 


HH 


O 


z 


o 




X 


< 


o 


J 


o 


I-H 


s 


CQ 


— ) 


CJ 


HH 


u 


^ 


CQ 


j 


H 


< 


H 


J 


J 


X 


OS 


z 


X 


z 


o 


Q 


>- 


X 


E- 


U 


os 


UJ 


o 


< 


o 


UJ 


1— 1 


E- 


X 


< 


UJ 


O 


< 


< 


CQ 


CQ 


u 


u 


►J 


_J 


CO 


X 


:s 


^ 


H 



212 



GO 
O 

u 



o 

o 

CO 



KJ 


vO 


O 


CT> 


to 


00 


CM 


CM 


O0 


vO 


LO 


CM 


"3- 


CO 


^f" 


«tf 


CN 


CN 


r— 1 


sO 


CTi 


to 


LO 


i— 1 


00 


i— I 


i— l 


to 


i— I 


tO 


i— 1 








t— ( 






i— I 






CM 





LO O .-I 



tO CM 

tO i-H 



O H 

cm r^ 



to 



LO CM 

tO ^H 



CT> i— ( 



i-l to 



vO 00 
r-t CM 



tO CT> 
i— I CM 



.-< cm 



LO oo 
oo .-i 

CM 





2 




s 






z 












H 

o 






< 




O 




3 


UJ 




o 












H 






O 




H 


H 


O 


J 


a 


H 


z 




>- 


Q 






c 




E- 




CJ 


2 


0£ 


co 


Cri 


u 


J 




a: 


z 


z 




o 






X 


z 


O 


O 


i— i 


o 


2: 


o 




3 


< 


o 




•H 


o 


Q 


c 


1— 1 


S 


OQ 


j 


u 


HH 


u 


3= 


DO 


►J 


H 




+-> 


o 


Z 


H 


J 


J 


X 


CCS 


2 


X 


z 


o 


a 


>- 


CO 




•H 


4-> 


s 


U 


CC 


w 


o 


< 


o 


w 




H 


3 


< 


0J 




3 


CD 


< 


< 


CQ 


00 


U 


u 


J 


J 


CO 


CO 


3= 


3= 




H 


S 


CJ3 



213 



I 


Tfr CM 

a. r^ 


00 
tO 

cm 




vO 


LO 

o 




en 

■— 1 


o 


oo 
to 


cm 
cm 


t-- 

o 
i— i 


o 

o 


o 


cm 
to 

CO 


o 

CM 

O 


o 


cm 

LO 


00 
vO 

r-- 


i—i 

00 


tO 
LO 
LO 


CM 
LO 


00 
LO 


00 
LO 


o 

LO 


LO 


o 

CM 


tO 

o 


o 

LO 


00 

o 


rH to 
rH to 

i— i 


— i 


i— t 
i— t 


00 


-H 


LO 

LO 


CM 


LO 


r-t 


CM 


to 


o 

CM 

cm 


oo 


O 

00 


r-l 
LO 


CM 


r-- 

■— i 

CM 


00 


LO 


to 


•—< 
to 

LO 


LO 
Csl 




o 

r-l 


■— 1 

r-H 


Q> 


to 

CM 

to 


to 


LO 

to 




&9- 








































ee- 



















00 CM -H Tt 


00 LO vO 


\£> 


lo vO oo cm 


1 1 ^J- LO vO 1 


1 00 


\D O f-H O 


1 1 (NJ ,-11 


1 r— 1 




1 1 1 


1 


LO (Nl tO 






(NJ 







\D LO vO LO 

^ to N N 

(N tO 



u 
a: r- 

co cr> 



Tt rH »0 O 
rH rH (NJ O. 

r- ■«* oo 



rfr^O(NiLoai0^h~tooo<-i'^-otooo 

r^tOtOtO\OvOCT>r-(00tO0000(N(Nl\O 

\0000^\0(M!N\OOtWWONN 



rH rH tO (N1LO I— I rH CM r-l 



o v0\oa>oovor» o. 

cm oo oo vo to .h t-~ itNi 

o LOLor^i-HLOtoio 

n •> « « A « Ik 

CM LO tO 0\ to r-l O 



J o 

O to 
O 

X eg 

U 2 

CO X 



< I 
u 

I— I \Q 

2 r- 

X a. 

u ^ 
u 



a 
UJ co 

u C_J 

s> 

H or. 
2 UJ 
O CO 

u 



O r-H 


(N 


o. 


tO (N 


1 vO 


o 


O (N| 


1 i— t 


00 



O HlrtvO 00 

O HI/IN I ^> 

lo to oo r^ i o 



O X 



\0 00 r-H LO 

to (Nl to VO 


HO>iONl/)tMJ>^r*OOOH\OOf 
OOHHO^fOOtNMlfltOOlvO 


r-l 00 
1 r-l CT> 
1 00 VO 


l—l 


i-H 

i o. 


rH O 

O. vO 

i \£> r-< 


o o 

LO LO 

i r-» lo 


vO ^t vO O 
CT> LO O 

be- 


O-Tj-LOLOOLOrHOOLOCMOOtOrHCM 

vOLOTtot^a^r^rgor^vOrf—tr^ 

r-l r-l (NJ ,-H 


LO Tt 


LO 

to 

(N| 

rH 

be- 


I o 


1 O LO 

r-t i-H 


1 to o 

i-H 





















•H 














(rt 
































■M 














<u 
































03 














+J 
































rH 














3 














u 


















<v 














XP 














o 


















06 












to 


(J tH 














-M 
























t/) 






<D 


C -P 














O 


















c 






o 






(rt 


0) (rt 














<D 


















03 






•H 






C 


+-> X) 














U 













c 






1 






+-> 






<u 


<U 3 














•H 






O 






o 










o 




c 


Oh 


O.CO 














a 




(J (rt 


•H 

> 






•H 


10 




X 






jC 




o 

•H 


X 

LU 


e oo 
o • c 












trt 


<u i 




•H <U 


rH 






03 


O 




tA 






4-> 




P 




C_> (rt -H 












O 


o 




CH 13 


0) 




X 


o 


>H 




c 






< 




03 


T3 


^ X 










if) 


(J 


4-) -M 




LH crj 


co 




+-) 


•r-l 


C 




o 






■»>. 




O 


0) 


i-H fH (J 










o 


C -H 


+J c 




O rH 




w 


r-H 


t-< 


03 




•H 






•a 




3 


•M 


cd <U cd 










u 


•h a> u 


•H <U 




H 


i-H 


u 


(Tj 


x 


X 


X ■!-) 






LU 




-o 


3 


C rH O 






i— ( 




•H 


fS 


c 


10 


a3 


•H 


a> 


rd 


U 


60 


a3 








-a 


CU 


X) 


O U H 






03 




e 


np (J 0) 


o 


GO 


•H 


c 


w X 


U. 


a 


O 


U 






i— I 


UJ 




•H 


•H 


(rt 




3 




rt -H CO 


O 0) 


•H 


i-i •• C 


a 


o 


(J 




s 


r-l 


•H 




0) 


03 




r— 1 


rH 


P >>rH 


»M 




(rt 




<D 


"rH rH (J 


U -P 


c/> 


rt 60-h 


U 


rH 


•H T) 


10 




o 


c 




o 


O 


u 


03 


+-> 


rt <-> cd 


o 




•H 





CO 


c 


•H 


a c -a 


o 


«J 


X <D 


i — i 


rH 


c 


3 




c 


•H 


a> 


•H 


(rt 


Onr-H +J 


o 


x> 







O CD -H 


r-f -H 


> 


•H -H r-l 


£ 


o 


Oh-H 


o3 


0) 


X 


i 


45 





(rt 


> 


O 


•H 


3 3 O 


CQ 


u 




£ 


X 


O.CO +j 


o u 


M 


OX'H 


E 





(Tj i-H 


•M 


2 


o 


+-> 


•H 


X 


•H 


a 


T3 


o o ^ 




o3 


o 


aj 


■r-> 


(rt 4) 


o a) 


<u 


C O 3 


O 


. — 1 


JH r-H 


<L> 


O 


<u 


o 


o3 


o 


x: 


JH 


Oh 


C 


o a 


+-> 


5h 


•H 


T3 


i-H 


CTJH 


x: ex 


Oh 


•H Cfj CQ 


U 


LU 


e> < 


S 


a. 


H 


CJ 


S 


co 


Ch 


a 


CO 


X 


O U, 


X 


X 


-3 


•H 


03 


rt O X 


a 3 


3 


r-l O 






























<u 


•H 


3 


3 


<U 


rH O +-> 


CO CO 


co 


CL, E- 






























r- 


kJ 


< 


5 


X 


H u. <C 


o o 


o 


O O 






























O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o o o 


o o 


o 


o o 






























O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


O O rH 


r-l (Nl 


r-l 


(Nl tO 






























<* 


LO 


vO 


l>» 


CM 


tO Tj- LO 


r-H r-H 


n 


(N CM 






























CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


to 


to to to 



214 



H vOvO 
0\ CT> O 
CM O (N 


CM 

en 




to 


en 

LO 


1*. 
i— i 


o 


en 


en 


cm 

CM 


O vO 

o r- 

Cn 00 


en 

00 


to 

— i 


o 
to 

cn 


to 00 to 
—t vO O 
i-H CM 

*9- 


LO 

cm 


CM 


"3- 

CM 


to 
to 


cm 


CM 

00 


CM 

cm 




LO 


i— l 


to 


00 


o 

i— i 



r-- r-- 

rH o 



f-i vO O 

cnoi o 



i-H O 


^ . 


r-H tO 


<n[ 


LO cn 


^1 




N 


H O 


° 


f-H 


cn 




oo 








<— i 




V* 1 



o 


1^ \0 


00 I 


( 1 C7> vO 


"t 1 


i i to r-- 



r«» r-- cn 


"3- 


r^ \0 r- i 


to 


to cn rf i 


LO 


* i 




CM 


NO 




LO 




to 




•69- 



TT to 
tO nt 

r-- ra- 



ta CO 

^ U 
^> 
H OS 
Z W 

o to 



r^ \0 vO 


o r-- cn 


t-^ 


vO 


LO LO 


LO Cn O 


tfl N^T 


cn 


r-» 


CM CM 


so en cm 


» O i-H LO 1 


i ^t 


1 i-H 


1 vO OJ 




I « •> « I 


i •> 


1 


I » 


h- oo to 


1 (N 00 tO > 


1 (N 




1 '3- 


i-l vO O 


r-H to 


CM 




i-H 


CM 










«e- 











CM 


i-H 


CnI 


vO 


LO 


tJ- 






CM 


O 




LO 




i-H 




V3- 





o 


CM 


CO 


LO 1 


i cn 


UJ 


Cn I 


1 cn 


•—I 


- 1 


1 •> 


as 


r-H 


LO 


<r 


00 


CM 


j 






< 






CO 







r- o ^t 

COOH 







X 








TO 








X 


J 






TO X 


< 






Q- O 


E- 


to 


o 


TO 


O 


cu 


o 


10 


H 


•H 


c 


•♦-> 




4-> 


TO 


c o 




•H 


fn 


3 O 




.—1 


3 


o o 




•H 


10 


o * 




+-» 


C 


O i-H 




=3 


HH 


< ** 




O 


o 


O TO 




to 


o 


<o X 





*-> O 

00 C -H 

<o c <u > 

3 r-l -H CO 

O -H 3 

u 3 cr -m 

U03U C 



t|H C>h C|H 

o o o 



o 



to 
a> o 
co c 



<U O <D -H 



o o 



C -H 00 X c c 

O T3 c ♦-> a> <u 

•H O -H -H +J «-> 

-M 4-> <-» ^H C C 



O 4-> 

„ c <u 

c3 rt oi 

c c 

0) (U 0) 

c c 



u£T 4-» 

• H tO 

T) > 4-> 

O aJ <-> to 

O J o «o 

< < 



u o 

00 o 
O X 

u o 
a. co 

00 U 

c <u 

4-> -H g 

C C g 
<U <u 3 
6 > CO 

u i 



aJ to 

»H 3 

4) CJ 



S- 



3 s: 



CCC<U T)>+->Q>W rtT3 

to aJ rt oi C-ho>Vh i u a» 

3 *-> 
+J C T) TO 

, <U M O W O 
X TO ^h Oi TO -H O 

OJhTOOTJ f-i+J+J^H 

TOTOTOi-HS-M-HtlJ+JSrt— ' — ' 
SSSP.tOC>XXOOO 
6 C 



r h 5 -H -H J) O rt T) 

UHOiuu.Qa:>< 



vO to vO O i—t vO 

t^- lo f-t to a> cm 

o o a> oo cm vo 

i-H TT tO vO i-H •<^- 



<u a) 

o o 

> > 

fH M 

CO CO 

oj a> 

4_) 00 -P tO (O tO 

o <u o a> a> a; 

TO -H TO -H -H -H 

Lh Lh Jh H rH ^( 

4-> TOP PL, CL, TO 

c ^ c a. &,— • 

O TO O 3 3 « 

U CO U CO CO CO 



O OOOOOOOOOOOOO 
O OCMtOOi-HCMtOOOOOOO 
O i-Hi-Hi-HCMCMCMCMi-HCMtOCMOO 



o o o o o o 

o o o o © o 

cm to to to lo r^ 

i-H CM CM CM CM CM 



215 



The Minuteman Regional Vocational School Committee would like to 
close this report with a note of appreciation to former members 
Lawrence A. Ovian of Sudbury, General Richard F. Zeoli of Lexington, 
and Lydia A. Smith of Concord who concluded their service on the 
Committee during 1977. 




-..■iff* 



mf40> 



Minuteman Regional 
Vocational Technical 
School. 



Students test a box 
sealing machine used in 
Minuteman Tech 's new 
Packing Technology 
program, the first one to 
be set up in New England. 




Girls as well as boys may be 
found in all Minuteman shops. 



216 



VITAL STATISTICS 



29 births, 50 marriages and 32 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1977, as follows: 



BIRTHS 



Date of 
Birth 


1976 




Nov. 
1977 


28 



Name of Child 



Names of Parents 



Jan. 3 

Jan. 11 

Jan. 29 

Jan. 29 

Feb. 5 

Feb. 25 

Mar. 27 

Apr. 1 

Apr. 8 

Apr. 21 

Apr. 28 

Apr. 30 



May 
May 



May 23 
May 27 
June 17 
June 20 
July 15 
Aug. 8 
Aug. 23 
Aug. 27 
Sept. 21 
Oct. 28 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 23 



Caitlin Morgan Ash 



Richard Charles Hagopian 
Shastin Slaymaker Seeley 
Sonja Ann Lee 
Laura Elizabeth Hawkinson 
James Warren May, III 
Azjah Ram Klate 
Jessica Stewart 
Brian Younghin Heifferon 
Aimee Marie Gauthier 
Sarah Wheelwright Parke 
David Samuel Avery Gargill 
Diane Adams Moss 
Michael Lawrence Palmer 
Reid Boylston Adams 
Matthew Evan Gregoire 
Amy Elizabeth Carroll 
Christopher Shane Gay 
Emily Allen Rossiter 
Laura Catherine Semerjian 
Elizabeth Burton Flint 
Anne DeSales Struble 
Robert Andrew Kerr 
Christopher Arthur Dreisbach 
Darcy Cordner Adams 
Scott Alton Collins 
Jill Amy O'Loughlin 
Curtis Allen Risley, Jr. 
Peter Wheelock Morton 



John K. § Martha C. Ash 



Charles R. $ Stella M. Hagopain 
George W. $ Susan S. Seeley 
Arden J. $ Ann Marie Lee 
Lowell B. $ Suzanne K. Hawkinson 
James W., Jr. £ Linda H. May 
Jonathan S. $ Carlotta W. Klate 
Henry A. Stewart § Diane Wagoner 



John C. $ 
Robert J. 
Nathan G. 
Robert M. 
Rodney E. 
Waldo E., 
Peter B. 
Richard D. 
Richard P. 
Frank W. , 
Walter A. 
Evan Y. & 
Robert M. 
Dennis D. 
Robert H. , 



Chun C. Heifferon 
§ Aura S. Gauthier 
§ Ann I . Parke 
$ Marian L. Gargill 
5 Elizabeth T. Moss 
Jr. § Janice D. Palmer 
$ Sharon P. Adams 
§ Donna P. Gregoire 
$ Elaine Y. Carroll 



II d, Rose F. Gay 
$ Selina G. Rossiter 
Barbara V. Semerjian 
$ Linda C. Flint 
§ Claudia N. Struble 
Jr. £ Dee S. Kerr 
Timothy A. $ Patricia F. Dreisbach 
John $ Patricia Adams 
Lawrence A. $ Janet S. Collins 
John M. § Joanne O'Loughlin 
Curtis A. £ Jean F. Risley 
Peter W. $ Judy Morton 



217 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 

Jan. 8 



Jan. 21 

Jan. 21 

Jan. 22 

Jan. 22 

Jan. 27 

Feb. 19 

Feb. 19 

Mar. 5 

Mar. 5 

Mar. 12 

Mar. 12 

Mar. 17 

Mar. 25 

May 1 

May 14 

May 21 



Names 



Residence 



Alix Mathieu 
Diana DiPadua 

Henry A. Cretella 
Ruth Reed Copeland 

J. William Adams 

Claudette DeClairville Lockwood 

Kenneth M. Segien 
Patricia A. Campobasso 

Roy Edward Peterson, III 
Mary Helen Karalis 

Howard Sohn 
Susan Housman 

Dean W. Aldrich 
Vivienne M. LoSchiavo 

James F. O'Brien 

Norma (Greenberg) Elfner 

Gerald C. Vigneron 
Anne-Marie McGarry 

Walter A. Prokowiew 
Susan Mahoney 

John Henry Finnerty 
Deborah Ann Davis 

Terrence M. Cassidy 
Patricia A. Lyndell 

James M. Greeley 
Bernice C. J. Lankhorst 

Peter W. Morton 
Judy B. Vandiver 

George Michael Jamgochian 
Deborah Ann Simourian 

Vladimir Janovsky 
Pamela M. Williams 

Lawrence Kotin 
Katherine Adams Glover 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Marblehead, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Maiden, Mass. 

Dorchester, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

New York, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass, 



218 



Names 



Residence 



May 21 

May 21 

May 27 

June 10 



June 17 



June li 



June 19 

June 24 

June 25 

June 25 

June 25 

July 2 

July 4 

July 9 

July 30 

Aug. 6 



Russell McManus 
Ann Hag en i an 

Joseph A. Murphy 
Andrea Comstock 

James M. Smith 
Kathleen McPherson 

Robert I. Higley, Jr. 
Laurel Anne High 

Gregory A. Hawkes 
Elaine M. Parker 

Robert J. Hanlon 
Eileen Belle 

Jeffrey Mark Santlofer 
Linda June Easterday 

Albert G. Andersen 
Gail M. Lojek 

Richard James Widhu 
Sarah Marie Boys 

William Charles Hankey, III 
Marilou Pahigian 

David A. Fahrland 
Lu Eldridge Seiler 

W. Fletcher Watton 
Linda Seeckts 

Edward Donlan Rooney 
Alice L. M. Bradbury 

Richard S. Lee 
Josephine K. Gump 

Hobart 0. Winchell 
Susan Clark 

Paul Harold Slade 
Mary Evelyn Toler 

John Woody Harlan 
Leslie Kristiana Ericson 

Jeffrey David Lukowsky 
Ramelle Frost Adams 



Park Ridge, N. J. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Bedford, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Simsbury, Conn. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Groton, Mass. 
Groton, Mass. 

Wo burn, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 

Kingston, N. H. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Watertown, Mass. 
Watertown, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Littleton, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Needham, Mass. 

Bolton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Sylvania, Ohio 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Bergenfield, N. J 
Lincoln, Mass. 



219 



Date of 
Marriage 

Aug. 13 
Aug. 13 
Aug. 14 
Aug. 20 
Aug. 27 
Sept. 4 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 24 
Sept. 27 
Oct. 15 
Nov. 26 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 24 



Names 



Residence 



Dennis Ray Howland 
Mary Jane Kaltenbach 

Stephen Allen Goerdt 
Melissa Collingwood 

David P. Boutin 
Phyllis A. Troisi 

Daniel Louis Kowalczyk 
Virginia Ellen Hall 

Barry A. Mareiro, Jr. 
Diana L. Couto 

Bruce Ivor McPherson 
Aurilee Anne Hawley 

Stephen P. Lopez 
Nancy J. Farrell 

A. Lewis Rogers 
Deborah Prouty Tosi 

Stephen D. Coan 
Heather A. Williams 

David Philip Braun 
Jane Katherine Sal lade 

Peter A. Troisi 
Laura E. Male 

Francis Edward Donovan 
Elizabeth C. C. Gombosi 

Harold Leslie Stacey 
Deborah Jean McKnight 

Walter Ward 
Eva Heuchele 

Ralph Byrd 

Diane White Bennett 



Bedford, Mass. 
Bedford, Mass. 

Riverside, 111. 
Riverside, 111. 

Boxboro, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Holbrook, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lexington, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

No. Vancouver, B. C 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Waltham, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Cohasset, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Hingham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Boxborough, Mass. 
Boxborough , Mas s . 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
East Orange, N. J. 



220 



DEATHS 



Date 


of 


Death 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


20 


Jan. 


20 


Feb. 


26 


Apr. 


26 


Apr. 


28 


May 


7 


May 


9 


May 


15 


May 


15 


May 


15 


May 


19 


June 


15 


July 


16 


July 


22 


July 


23 


July 


26 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


22 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


28 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


19 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


16 


Nov. 


19 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


19 


Dec. 


24 



Age 



Name 



John Primak 

Francis T. Gilbert 

Mildred E. (Hodgdon) Peck 

Joe Emma MacLean 

Ralph R. McKay 

Emily (Donovan) Chapman 

Wendy Sue Budro 

Abigail Adams Atchley 

Mary Faunce 

Alice (Gorvette) Boyce 

Thomas K. Worthington 

Helen A. (Friend) Dadmun 

Carmel Umbrello 

Charles F. Turner 

Nancy (Veitch) Cole 

Joseph Charles Hagenian 

Neal P. Russell 

Scott I. Mixon 

Sofia (Stavchuck) Oldfield 

Thomas Pym Cope 

Dorothy Anne Carter (Sister Clare Joseph) 

Patricia (Powers) Smith 

Marion Noreen (Sullivan) Sullivan 

Elizabeth Veronica (Gilbert) Hallett 

Ekkehard L. Kreidl 

Jan H. Warner 

Edith Lillian Rendall 

Maria F. Weller 

George G. Haworth 

Frederick Holbrow 

August Christian Maurer 

Helen (Baldwin) Dabney 



Years Months Days 



92 
69 
70 
89 
79 
82 

21 

51 

81 

71 

76 

69 

67 

39 

55 

17 

82 

58 

80 

92 

47 

77 

74 

67 

26 

77 

53 

73 

78 

90 

69 



9 
3 
4 
3 

1 
7 


1 

11 
7 
1 
9 
5 
7 
1 
7 
4 
4 
4 

3 
4 

11 
9 
4 

11 
6 
1 
4 

11 



11 
19 
16 
15 
25 
15 
38 




26 
23 




20 
22 

4 
15 
29 
10 
16 
18 

8 
13 
17 

4 
24 
15 
24 

25 

17 



221 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



$ Petronella R. M. 
§ Carol F. 



Abbott, John A. $ Diana B. 
Abbott, Margaret G. f T Walter D. 
Abco Realty Trust 
Ackley, Wallace E. § Ethel G. 
Adams, John, Patricia, Peter 5 

Sharon K. 
Adams, John Quincy 
Adams, John Quincy £ Lucy D. 
Adams, John Quincy, et als, Trs. 
Adams, Lydia S. 
Adams, Ramelle C. 
Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. § Barbara M. 
Adler, Harold $ Ivy Ruth 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Algeo, Leo J. 
Algeo, Leo J. § Elaine T. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 
Ali-Oglu, Egon 
Allen, Richard A 
Allen, Robert L. 
Allen, Walter P. 
Allison, John R. £ Marion S. 
Allison, William S. § Caroline P. 
Althausen, Alex F. £ Emily D. L. 
American Tel. S Tel. Co. 
Ammen, David L. § Judith B. 
Andersen, Grace A. 
Anderson, Carl L. 

Anderson, Lawrence B. £ Rosina DuP. 
Anderson, Mildred D. $ Ronald F. 
Anderson, Sandra B. 
Andrews, Francis S. S Dorothy W. 
Angel 1, Craig W. $ Carolyn G. 
Ann Marie Beauty Chateau 
April le, Thomas J. § Amelia J. 
Armstrong, C. Robert 
Armstrong, John L. 
Art, Robert J. & Suzanne 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. $ Barbara S. 
Austin, Richard C. £ Marcia W. 
Autenrieth, Ronald C. 
Avery, Abigail D. 



Bacon, Horatio W. § Anne D. 
Baggs, Arthur, Jr. $ Marion S. 
Bailey, Rebecca B. 



Aggregate - 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 34,400 


$ 2,380.48 




32,400 


2,242.08 




20,900 


1,446.28 




100 


6.92 




68,100 


4,712.52 


450 




31.14 




109,700 


7,591.24 




46,000 


3,183.20 


300 




20.76 




79,500 


5,501.40 


250 




17.30 




34,300 


2,373.56 




67,500 


4,671.00 




300 


20.76 


150 




10.38 




26,400 


1,826.88 


81,700 




5,653.64 




41,900 


2,899.48 




18,700 


1,294.04 




33,600 


2,325.12 




37,300 


2,581.16 




34,800 


2,408.16 




43,300 


2,996.36 




40,400 


2,795.68 


81,100 


7,500 


6,131.12 




53,400 


3,695.28 




121,200 


8,387.04 




31,100 


2,152.12 




49,800 


3,446.16 




21,500 


1,487.80 




32,800 


2,269.76 




68,000 


4,705.60 




56,300 


3,895.96 


1,200 




83.04 




13,300 


920.36 




42,600 


2,947.92 




82,800 


5,729.76 




23,600 


1,633.12 




43,800 


3,030.96 




56,100 


3,882.12 




27,700 


1,916.84 




35,400 


2,449.68 




32,700 


2,262.84 




30,000 


2,076.00 




59,000 


4,082.80 



222 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Bair, Medill § Sophia 
Baird, Gordon P. $ Sarah F. 
Baldwin, Beatrice L. $ Est. of 

Herbert L. 
Baldwin, Jacqueline L. 
Baldwin, Robert H. § Susan E. 
Baldwin, Roger P. $ Mary L. S. 
Ballou, Mildred A. 
Balogh, Karoly & Judith 
Banks, Ann S. M. 
Banks, Talcott M. 
Barbarow, Ruth 
Barber, Doris 

Barbera, Anthony A. £ Eleanor E. 
Bardsley, Theodore J. £ Doris A. 
Bare, Bruce M. £ Helen S. 
Barkas, Christopher W. £ Mary Ann 
Barker, W. B. S Janet B. 
Barnaby, John M. £ Charlotte B. 
Barnes, Benjamin A. £ Ann B. 
Barnet, James R. $ Jane A. 
Barr, Edgar E. 5 Olive H. 
Barry, Jon T. § Barbara M. 
Basile, Francis P. 
Bassett, Kenneth E. 
Batchelder, Robert R. 5 Hannah W. 
Beal, Bruce A. $ Enid L. 
Beal, Thomas P., Jr. § Barbara B. 
Beenhouwer, Owen $ Lillemor 
Belanger, Michael P. 
Belanger, Michael P. S Gisa E. 
Belanger, Walter E. $ Mary F. 
Bell, C. Gordon $ Gwendolyn K. 
Bell, Donald G. , Jr. 
Bell, Roger A. 

Bellantoni, Eleanor M. , Trustee 
Belle, Gene § Irene 
Bennett, Doris E. 

Benson, John R. § Allott, Kathryn J 
Benson, Peter M. $ Ann D. 
Bentley, Barbara Hyde 
Bent ley, Robert P. 
Bentley, Robert P. $ Joyce S. 
Berenson, Sheldon J. § Carol H. 
Bergen, Kenneth W. $ Emily F. 
Bergen, Kenneth § Bator, Peter, Trs 
Berger, Ralph § Carol H. 
Berman, Donald S. $ Edith M. 
Bernard, Clark L. § Susana R. 
Bibring, George L. $ Marcia G. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 20,400 


$ 1,411.68 




53,800 


3,722.96 




38,300 


2,650.36 




28,700 


1,986.04 




79,000 


5,466.80 




38,100 


2,636.52 




12,300 


851.16 




46,100 


3,190.12 




33,400 


2,311.28 




170,500 


11,798.60 




9,200 


636.64 


150 




10.38 




33,800 


2,338.96 




15,900 


1,100.28 




38,100 


2,636.52 




28,500 


1,972.20 




38,600 


2,671.12 




41,200 


2,851.04 




40,900 


2,830.28 




88,000 


6,089.60 




34,100 


2,359.72 




49,200 


3,404.64 


3,050 




211.06 




19,700 


1,363.24 




49,000 


3,390.80 




76,700 


5,307.64 




71,700 


4,961.64 




2,900 


200.68 


5,150 




356.38 




15,300 


1,058.76 




28,700 


1,986.04 




38,700 


2,678.04 


4,700 




325.24 




22,500 


1,557.00 




5,900 


408.28 




27,000 


1,868.40 




21,200 


1,467.04 




16,400 


1,134.88 




27,900 


1,930.68 




11,200 


775.04 




7,000 


484.40 




45,300 


3,134.76 




27,300 


1,889.16 




72,400 


5,010.08 




22,500 


1,557.00 




39,600 


2,740.32 




45,700 


3,162.44 




41,900 


2,899.48 




26,600 


1,840.72 



223 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Bienfang, Don C. § Denise R. 

Bikales, Norman $ Ann B. 

Billings, Sarah W. 

Billings, Bruce H. 

Birkett, James D. 6 Sarah P. 

Birmingham, James G. § Carolyn 

Bisbee, Marie E. 

Bjork, Albion P. $ Elizabeth 

Black, Everett A. $ Anne E. 

Black, Thomas E. 

Blanchard, Eilene 

Blood, David $ Iva D. 

Bobbitt, Lake H. £ Sarah G. 

Boccadoro, Joseph £ Ida 

Bockoven, John S. 

Bockoven, John S. $ Dorothy R. 

Bodkin, John F. $ Marilyn Kay 

Boersner, Wolfram A. § Doris M. 

Bogner, Walter F. 

Bolt, Richard H. $ Katherine L. 

Bolton, Warren R. $ Doris A. 

Bond, Roger B. § Elizabeth C. 

Bonia, Walter J. 

Booth, Alice Burrage 

Booth, Robert H. 

Boquist, Wallace P. 

Boston Edison Company 

Boston Gas Company 

Bower, Joseph L. § Nancy M. 

Bowles, Clifford 

Bowman, Edward F. $ Doreen W. 

Bowman, William A. § Zenta E. 

Boyce, Alice M. 

Boyce, James B. § Manley B. , II 

Boyer, Edward £ Donnelly, Roberta 

Boyer, Edward 

Boyer, John H. 

Boyer, Louis L. S Elaine T. 

Boyer, Markley H. § Julie M. 

Boynton, Daniel C. $ Janet K. 

Bracken, Donald J. $ Callahan, 

John W. 
Bradford, Robert L. 5 Muriel H. 
Bradlee, Henry G., Ill, $ Sandra N. 
Bradley, Clifford $ Jeannette E. 
Bradley, Philip H. $ Louise W. 
Brain, J. Walter $ Patricia L. 
Brannen, Robert C. § Barbara A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 24,800 


$ 1,716.16 




57,100 


3,951.32 




2,100 


145.32 




1,900 


131.48 




18,400 


1,273.28 




52,000 


3,598.40 




19,500 


1,349.40 




39,900 


2,761.08 




99,300 


6,871.56 




41,300 


2,857.96 




18,100 


1,252.52 




21,500 


1,487.80 




26,400 


1,826.88 




1,100 


76.12 


400 




27.68 




22,700 


1,570.84 




29,600 


2,048.32 




36,100 


2,498.12 




35,400 


2,449.68 




56,600 


3,916.72 




4,000 


276.80 




28,100 


1,944.52 




27,100 


1,875.32 




2,700 


186.84 




63,400 


4,387.28 




69,400 


4,802.48 


2,320,000 


3,200 


160,765.44 


490,000 




33,908.00 




51,000 


3,529.20 




24,700 


1,709.24 




22,800 


1,577.76 




28,600 


1,979.12 




27,500 


1,903.00 




12,900 


892.68 




23,700 


1,640.04 




98,700 


6,830.04 




48,100 


3,328.52 




20,500 


1,418.60 




102,500 


7,093.00 




39,800 


2,754.16 




23,300 


1,612.36 




19,200 


1,328.64 




48,800 


3,376.96 




10,600 


733.52 




33,900 


2,345.88 




17,000 


1,176.40 




29,500 


2,041.40 



224 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Browne, Secor D. 

Brown, Elizabeth 
John B. S 
Robert P. 
Robert W. 



Brown, 
Brown , 
Brown , 
Bucci, 
Buchan 



Braude, Stephen E. 
Braun, Morton B. & Esther K. 
Brennan, William L. £ Eleanor A. 
Brewster, Ellen Beebe 
Brisson, Norman F. § Evelyn W. 
Bromberg, Nathan S. £ Selma 
Bronson, Franklin C. 5 Catherine M. 
Brooks, Paul 

§ Mary D. 

G. 

Ann P. 

$ Jeane Hunter, Trs, 

& Lee R. 
Frank P. £ Arlene M. 
William R. 
Buchan, William R. § Barbara C. 
Bucher, Edward A. $ Gail J. Phillips 
Buckler, Sheldon A. $ Marilyn L. 
Buerger, Martin J. § Lila 
Buonopane, Paul J. £ Mary 
Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa C. 
Burk, George W. 5 Ruth M. 
Burke, Ruth Bemis 
Burke, Walter J., Jr. $ Helen M. 
Burnham, Robert B. 
Burnham, Robert Boit S M. Elaine 
Bums, Melvin P. $ Est. of Elizabeth 
Burt, William F. $ Donna G. 
Butler, William B. $ Mary Jane 
Butts, Louise M. 



Callahan, Helen T. 
Campobasso, Anthony B. $ Dorothy M. 
Campobasso, Joseph R. § Mary Anne 
Cannon, Ellen DeN. § Bradford 
Cannon, Ellen DeN., Bradford, Robert 

Laurent $ Betty H. 
Cantlin, John H. $ Antoinette T. 
Caper, Samuel P. $ Jane A. 
Caras, Byron 

Caras, Byron § Anastasia 
Caras, Ophair $ Florence L. 
Cardullo, Richard J. § F. Stephanie 
Carley, John A. § Joan Keir 
Carlson, Christopher T. $ Jane F. 
Carman, John W. 
Carman, John W. § Eleanor T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 78,200 


$ 5,411.44 




35,400 


2,449.68 




21,300 


1,473.96 




200 


13.84 




31,100 


2,152.12 




5,700 


394.44 




27,100 


1,875.32 




55,100 


3,812.92 




32,800 


2,269.76 




55,400 


3,833.68 




22,900 


1,584.68 




22,400 


1,550.08 




12,200 


844.24 




46,800 


3,238.56 


150 




10.38 




21,700 


1,501.64 




27,400 


1,896.08 




39,800 


2,754.16 




42,400 


2,934.08 




26,600 


1,840.72 




35,500 


2,456.60 




19,900 


1,377.08 




54,400 


3,764.48 




38,900 


2,691.88 


1,275 




88.23 




34,500 


2,387.40 




19,300 


1,335.56 




37,400 


2,588.08 




25,200 


1,743.84 




56,700 


3,923.64 




4,500 


311.40 




16,700 


1,155.64 




17,900 


1,238.68 




51,200 


3,543.04 




25,200 


1,743.84 




66,100 


4,574.12 




50,200 


3,473.84 


600 




41.52 




34,900 


2,415.08 




21,000 


1,453.20 




80,400 


5,563.68 




40,700 


2,816.44 




30,600 


2,117.52 


250 




17.30 




38,200 


2,643.44 



225 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 18,500 


$ 1,280.20 




18,300 


1,266.36 




18,200 


1,259.44 


900 




62.28 




58,900 


4,075.88 




76,900 


5,321.48 




33,300 


2,304.36 




19,100 


1,321.72 




54,600 


3,778.32 




700 


48.44 




20,100 


1,390.92 




14,600 


1,010.32 




39,500 


2,733.40 




54,600 


3,778.32 




55,300 


3,826.76 




18,100 


1,252.52 




16,200 


1,121.04 




52,100 


3,605.32 




29,200 


2,020.64 




24,500 


1,695.40 




24,100 


1,667.72 




38,200 


2,643.44 




20,000 


1,384.00 




21,300 


1,473.96 




38,700 


2,678.04 


1,000 




69.20 




27,800 


1,923.76 




41,600 


2,878.72 




56,600 


3,916.72 




43,200 


2,989.44 




24,900 


1,723.08 


450 




31.14 




24,200 


1,674.64 




23,700 


1,640.04 




25,100 


1,736.92 




21,700 


1,501.64 




47,200 


3,266.24 




37,500 


2,595.00 




15,000 


1,038.00 




12,700 


878.84 




40,100 


2,774.92 




29,100 


2,013.72 




24,800 


1,716.16 




40,300 


2,788.76 




32,900 


2,276.68 




37,300 


2,581.16 




74,300 


5,141.56 



Carroll, Irene J. 

Carroll, Marjory M. 

Carroll, Nancy M. , Trustee 

Carroll, Richard P. 

Carstensen, Warren £ Evelyn G. 

Carter, John H. 

Caruso, Robert § Abbie 

Casilio, Frank G. 

Caskey, Walter H. $ Anna H. 

Cassidy, Henry J. § Verna E. 

Cassidy, Robert E. £ Isabelle 

Cassidy, Verna E. 

Caswell, John Ross $ Carol B. 

Champeny, John C. § Leona G. 

Chapin, Louise B. $ Bertha L. 

Chapin, Margaret E. 

Chapman, Est. of James S. 5 Emily M. 

Chase, Barbara S. 

Cheever, Daniel S., Jr. 

Cherniack, Jerome R. 5 Elizabeth E. 

Chigas, Dianne Wasley 

Chiotelis, Charles L. $ Iasme J. 

Chipman, Robert H. & Mary F. 

Chisholm, Edward C. § Margaret F. 

Chou, Harry H. S. $ Lily 

Christensen, Ronald 

Christensen, Ronald £ Sasha M. 

Chu, Chauncey C. £ Margaret C. Y. 

Chu, Ge Yao S Wei Ying 

Church, Robert R. 5 Priscilla S. 

Ciampi, Mary P. 

Cibel, Stanley A. 

Cibel, Stanley A. 

Ciraso, Amelia 

Clagett, Donald C. 

Charlotte 
Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. $ Patricia D. 
Clark, Catharine T. § Est. of William 
Coan, Thomas § Catherine M. 
Coane, Amolia 

Coburn, Arthur L. , III, S Ann B. 
Coburn, Minnie E. § Est. of Edward S. 
Coffin, Stewart T. S Jane M. L. 
Cole, Edwin M. $ Lucy F. 
Cole, Hugh § Nancy V. 
Coleman, Mary Murray B. 
Collingwood, Shelley B. 



$ Thelma W. 
f T Hollister, 



226 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Collins, Edward C, II, $ Susan 

Collins, Laurence A. S Janet S. 

Comer ford, John F. £ Mary G. 

Comjean, Bruce P. 5 Marlies F. 

Comjean, Marc G. 

Comjean, Marc G. $ Judith K. 

Como, Florence J. 

Comstock, Charles B. 

Comstock, Charles B. 

Cone, Thomas E., Jr. 

Conley, David P. 

Connell, James J 

Connolly, David 

Connolly, Evelyn 

Conroy, Grace W. 

Constable, Katharine M. £ 

Constantine, Katherine P. 

Cook, David K. $ Carmel C 

Cook, Harry 

Cook, Jacqueline H. 

Cook, Paul W. , Jr. 

Cook, Paul W. , Jr. 5 

Coolidge, Henry P. 6 

Coons, Richard D. £ Nancy 

Cooper, Amiel G. § Lorna 

Cooper, E. Crawley 

Cope, Thomas Pym $ 

Copeland, Robert C 

Corbin, William L. 

Corcoran, Robert P. & Elizabeth D. 

Cormack, Allan M. 

Corrigan, Leo W. 

Corrigan, Mary 

Cotoia, Anthony J 

Cotoia, Anthony J 

Cotoia, Lucy Mary Anne 

Cotoni, Joseph 

Courtney, J. Donald 

Courtney, Joseph D. 5 Elaine H. 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Jeanne B. 5 Est. of 

Lawrence B. 
Cowles, Addison & Alexandra C. 
Crandall, Stephen H. & Patricia E. 
Crawford, John D. 5 Joanna W. 
Creighton, G. Alexander § Elizabeth 
Cretella, Mary C. 
Crook, Constance S. 



£ Joan M. 
6 Barbara 



§ Elizabeth J., Trs. 
& Est. of J. Irving 
William G. 



Marion M. 
Alice C. 
J. 



£ M. Jane 
Elizabeth W. 

5 Ruth R. 
£ Lucille J. 



5 Lucy M. A. 

6 Lucy M. , Trs 



L. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 29,600 


$ 2,048.32 




32,800 


2,269.76 




51,300 


3,549.96 




41,800 


2,892.56 


100 




6.92 




35,900 


2,484.28 




22,900 


1,584.68 


300 




20.76 




26,800 


1,854.56 




42,800 


2,961.76 




17,100 


1,183.32 




14,100 


975.72 




600 


41.52 




31,200 


2,159.0.4 




17,700 


1,224.84 




23,800 


1,646.96 




24,300 


1,681.56 




17,700 


1,224.84 


150 




10.38 




20,300 


1,404.76 


150 




10.38 




47,800 


3,307.76 




52,800 


3,653.76 




56,700 


3,923.64 




44,200 


3,058.64 




35,000 


2,422.00 




36,500 


2,525.80 




58,000 


4,013.60 




32,800 


2,269.76 




40,700 


2,816.44 




3,800 


262.96 




12,400 


858.08 




34,000 


2,352.80 




39,900 


2,761.08 




600 


41.52 




29,100 


2,013.72 




22,100 


1,529.32 


750 




51.90 




19,400 


1,342.48 




11,500 


795.80 




28,100 


1,944.52 




20,900 


1,446.28 




45,100 


3,120.92 




35,800 


2,477.36 




33,400 


2,311.28 


150 




10.38 




18,100 


1,252.52 



227 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Crooks, Thomas E. $ Naomi A. 
Culver, Perry J. £ Kate S. 
Culver, Perry J. 
Cummings, William R. £ Palma M. 
Cunningham, J. Lewis § Ruth P. 
Cunningham, Robert Allen § Margaret 
Cunningham, Robert M. £ Claire 
Cutter, Robert A. 



150 



29,900 
71,800 
6,100 
26,200 
21,200 
36,900 
23,600 
47,700 



2,069.08 
4,968.56 
422.12 
1,813.04 
1,467.04 
2,553.48 
1,633.12 
3,311.22 



Dabney, Helen W. 

Dadmun, Harrie H. § Helen 

Dahl, Thyra 

D'Alleva, Carmine 

Dalli, Francis J. § Mary E. 

Dallos, Andras $ Zsuzsanna 

Dalrymple, Chester & Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. S Dorothy C. 

Damico, Louise 

Pamico, Ralph P. £ Elvira 

Damico, Ralph P., Jr. § Edwina 

Damon, J. Gilbert § Priscilla A. 

Dane, Benjamin 

Dane, Benjamin § Alexandra C. 

Dane, Roger 

Dane, Roger S Lydia H. 

Daniels, Bruce G. § Janet B. 

Danosky, Edward A. 5 Mary C. 

Darling, Eugene M., Jr. 

Darling, 0. Leonard § Barbara M. 

Darman, Richard G. 

D'Arrigo Brothers Co. of Mass. 

D'Autremont, Chester C. $ Ruth W. 

Davidson, Robert W. § Cynthia A. 

Davidson, Michael 

Davis, Ethel B. 

Davis, Kelley Ann 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald C. 5 Barbara C. 

Davis, Sherman P. 

Davis, Sherman P. 5 Phyllis M. 

Davis, William A. £ R. May 

Davison, Alice P. 

Davy, Edgar W. § Louise W. 

Dawes, Donald L. § Ruth K. 

Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, William M. § Lorraine C. 

DeBaryshe, Paul £ Louise 



1,300 



350 
100 



100 
150 

100 



38,700 
44,300 
21,100 

40,800 
19,500 
53,900 
45,300 
22,000 
20,700 
13,300 
25,200 

84,000 

104,200 
56,100 
25,700 
30,500 
35,400 
38,800 
11,500 
74,400 
12,500 

16,700 

81,500 
21,600 

26,800 
32,800 
48,700 
33,600 
28,600 
15,300 
21,000 
27,600 



2,678 

3,065 

1,460 

89 

2,823 

1,349 

3,729 

3,134 

1,522 

1,432 

920 

1,743 

24 

5,812 

6 
7,210 
3,882 
1,778 
2,110 
2,449 
2,684 
795 
5,148 
865 

6 

1,155 

10 

5,639 

1,494 

6 
1,854 
2,269 
3,370 
2,325 
1,979 
1,058 
1,453 
1,909 



.04 
.56 
.12 
.96 
.36 
.40 
.88 
.76 
.40 
.44 
.36 
.84 
.22 
.80 
.92 
.64 
.12 
.44 
.60 
.68 
.96 
.80 
.48 
.00 
.92 
.64 
.38 
.80 
.72 
.92 
.56 
.76 
.04 
.12 
.12 
.76 
.20 
.92 



228 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



DeCilio, Frank W. $ Josephine R. 

Dee, Helena A. 

DeGuglielmo, Anthony A. £ Hagerty, 

Thomas H. , Trustees 
DeJesus, John § Geneva Ann 
De la Pena, Miguel § Irma 
D'Elia, John A. $ Maria Carmela 
Delori, Francois C. £ Rosamond P. 
Delori, Rosamond P. & Putnam, James A. 
Demone, Elsie R. $ Est. of Harold W. 
Denehy, Edward J. § Bernadette 
Denholm, A. Stuart £ Jane Leslie 
Denison, Mary Smith 
DeNormandie, James 
DeNormandie, James § Martha 
DeNormandie, James, Thomas L. , 

Katherine B. $ Victoria L. 
DeNormandie, James $ Alice W. 
DeNormandie, Philip Y. 
DeNormandie, Philip Y. $ Ernestine N. 

Rathborne 
DeNormandie, Robert L. £ Eliana 
DeNormandie, Victoria L. 
Derbyshire, Helen L. 
DesCognets, Archer B. § Gwendolyn G. 
Desmond, Kenneth 

Desmond, Kenneth A. § Catherine A. 
DeVito, Edith C. 
Dewey, Edward S. 
Dewey, Edward S. § Laurie T. 
Dewey, Edward § Zella 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Diab, Thomas A. 
Diab, Constance 
Dickey, Dana H. $ Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. $ Julia G. 
DiCecca, Vincent 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. $ Teresa E. 
Dillman, Douglas S. § Virginia S. 
Diminico, Antonetta £ Est. of Louis 
Dixon, Milburn J., Trustee 
Dixon, Russell J. $ Theresa J. 
Doherty, Elizabeth H. 
Doherty' s Garage, Inc. 
Doherty, William 
Doherty, William R. $ Phyllis M. 
Domenichella, Domenic 
Domenichella, Frank A., Jr. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 23,300 


$ 1,612.36 




18,700 


1,294.04 




26,800 


1,854.56 




37,100 


2,567.32 




34,700 


2,401.24 




34,800 


2,408.16 




33,800 


2,338.96 




800 


55.36 




26,800 


1,854.56 




45,900 


3,176.28 




43,400 


3,003.28 




62,700 


4,338.84 




10,100 


698.92 




65,400 


4,525.68 




8,900 


615.88 




22,700 


1,570.84 




1,500 


103.80 




37,200 


2,574.24 




50,000 


3,460.00 


150 




10.38 




100 


6.92 




52,200 


3,612.24 


250 




17.30 




23,300 


1,612.36 




27,400 


1,896.08 


250 




17.30 




59,600 


4,124.32 




31,500 


2,179.80 




62,300 


4,311.16 




5,400 


373.68 




101,000 


6,989.20 




19,300 


1,335.56 




21,900 


1,515.48 


350 




24.22 




31,800 


2,200.56 




30,800 


2,131.36 




47,300 


3,273.16 




2,100 


145.32 




26,100 


1,806.12 




44,900 


3,107.08 


1,000 


55,400 


3,902.88 


400 




27.68 




22,100 


1,529.32 




2,700 


186.84 


1,200 


400 


110.72 



229 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Domenichella, Frank A., Jr. § 








Margaret 


$ 


$ 19,000 


$ 1,314.80 


Donald, David H. £ Aida D. 




37,300 


2,581.16 


Donaldson, Charlotte L. 




6,000 


415.20 


Donaldson, Astrid L. 




34,400 


2,380.48 


Donaldson, Astrid L. , Extrx. 




300 


20.76 


Donaldson, David M. S Lynn B. 




72,200 


4,996.24 


Donaldson, Donald P. Trust 




900 


62.28 


Donaldson, Gordon A. 




53,000 


3,667.60 


Donaldson, Gordon A. £ Elizabeth A. 




41,700 


2,885.64 


Donaldson, Malcolm L. 




63,900 


4,421.88 


Donaldson, Robert D., Jr., Adm. 




9,800 


678.16 


Donnell, Samuel H. $ Marion L. 




39,500 


2,733.40 


Donovan, Donna M. 




26,400 


1,826.88 


Donovan, Leo A. & Elinor C. 




63,500 


4,394.20 


Dooley, Thomas J., Jr. § Helen 




5,600 


387.52 


Dorian, Paul 


300 




20.76 


Dorian, Paul £ Susan A. 




5,700 


394.44 


Dougherty, Allen R. 5 Helen M. 




14,800 


1,024.16 


Doughty, Joseph M. 




18,500 


1,280.20 


Downey, Edward F., Jr. $ Elizabeth F. 




19,100 


1,321.72 


Doyle, Charles E. £ Cathy J. 




20,700 


1,432.44 


Doyle, Richard F. £ Norma June 




56,500 


3,909.80 


Drago, Nicholas V. § Sara M. 




44,900 


3,107.08 


Drake, Lillian W. $ Garmory, Bertha V. 




17,800 


1,231.76 


Drake Park Realty, Inc. 




46,100 


3,190.12 


Dreisbach, Timothy A. £ Patricia F. 




17,700 


1,224.84 


Drew, Frederic T. $ Shirley D. 




13,400 


927.28 


Duane, Neil F. £ Floretta E. 




22,900 


1,584.68 


DuBois, Anson M. $ Olive S. 




18,800 


1,300.96 


Duborg, George F. 




38,200 


2,643.44 


Duff, Debbie 


150 




10.38 


Duffy, James E. , III, $ Barbara G. 




46,300 


3,203.96 


Duffy, James 


550 




38.06 


Dunham, Edward K. $ Helen P. 




38,700 


2,678.04 


Durnan, John P. £ Leona E. 




23,600 


1,633.12 


Durr, Bruno G. & Brigitte R. 




37,100 


2,567.32 


Dustin, Daniel E. & Rachel S. 




25,900 


1,792.28 


Eckhardt, Homer D. 




28,100 


1,944.52 


Ehrenfeld, John R. & Myma G. 




41,500 


2,871.80 


Elder, George D. £ Diana H. 




30,500 


2,110.60 


Elias, Eugene H. £ Gail G. 




21,400 


1,480.88 


Elkus, Howard S Lorna 




43,100 


2,982.52 


Elliott, Ethel M. 




27,100 


1,875.32 


Elliott, William G. & Peggy G. 




62,300 


4,311.16 


Ellis, Alexander, Jr. & Nancy B. 




65,300 


4,518.76 


Ellis. Eloise G. 




53,800 


3,722.96 



230 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Elwood, David M. $ Carol Jean 

Emerson, Claire G. 

Emery, Mary B. 

Emery, Richard B. $ Alice W. 

Emmons, A. Bradlee $ Judith Reed 

England, Albert E. 5 Priscilla S. 

Eppling, Frederic J. £ Sarah J. 

Ericson, Herbert E. S Erlyne R. 

Eshleman, Dean B. 

Evangelista, Florenzo T. $ Dorothy L. 

Evans, Lewis M. 5 Mary Lou 

Evans, Lucius W. £ Cynthia F. 

Everett, Jean M. § Robert R. 



£ Natalie A. 

§ Diane A. 
Ellen G. 
$ State St. Bank § 



Faddoul, George P. 
Fairbanks, Alan R. 
Faran, James J. $ 
Farley, Isabel K. 

Trust Co., Trs. 
Farley, Susan 

Fargo, Foster M. , Jr. £ Susan C. 
Farny, Michael H. § Ethel H. 
Farrar Village Conservation Trust, 

Trustees of 
Farrar Pond Village, Trustees of 
Farrell, Philip J. 5 Ruth E. 
Faunce, Mary Gill § Anthony 
Feinberg, Bernice 
Feldman, Roger D. $ Deborah W. 
Felegian, Peter 5 Marion 0. 
Fenijn, Chris J. $ Yvonne 
Ferguson, Charles E. 5 Phyllis G. 
Fernald, George H., Jr. § Eleanor T. 
Ferri, Edward J. S Eleanor J. 
Ferro, Armand F. $ Jacqueline M. 
Finnerty, James J. $ Anna C. 
Finnerty, Richard E. $ Wendy N. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. & Rose M. 
Fiscale, Joseph $ Rosanna 
Fischer, Kenneth A. 
Fisher, John W. 
Fitts, Gertrude W. £ Est. of Charles 

K. Fitts 
Fitzgerald, Derek J. $ Eleanor M. 
Fitzgerald, John H. $ Thelma C. 
Flannery, Constance H. 
Flannery, Donald 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 23,600 


$ 1,633.12 




20,600 


1,425.52 




29,600 


2,048.32 




27,100 


1,875.32 




50,500 


3,494.60 




54,200 


3,750.64 




22,600 


1,563.92 




31,100 


2,152.12 




13,600 


941.12 




17,800 


1,231.76 




25,400 


1,757.68 




70,400 


4,871.68 




29,600 


2,048.32 




26,000 


1,799.20 




100 


6.92 




39,800 


2,754.16 




28,400 


1,965.28 


100 




6.92 




22,900 


1,584.68 




20,300 


1,404.76 




20,000 


1,384.00 




133,600 


9,245.12 




28,600 


1,979.12 




49,700 


3,439.24 




4,100 


283.72 




33,700 


2,332.04 




30,900 


2,138.28 




29,400 


2,034.48 




25,100 


1,736.92 




67,600 


4,677.92 




2,700 


186.84 




20,700 


1,432.44 




21,300 


1,473.96 




42,200 


2,920.24 




30,600 


2,117.52 




30,500 


2,110.60 




65,200 


4,511.84 




36,100 


2,498.12 




61,100 


4,228.12 




24,300 


1,681.56 




27,600 


1,909.92 


250 


31,100 


2,152.12 
17.30 



231 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Flannery, Donald J. $ Harriet E. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. $ Louise H. 
Fleck, James D. $ Margaret E. 
Fleming, Clifford D. , Est. of $ E. 

Frances 
Fleming, William H. § Patricia H. 
Flint, Edward F. § Henry R. 
Flint, Eugenia N. 
Flint, George B. $ Lucie S. 
Flint, George B. § Eugenia 
Flint, Margaret P. 
Flint, Peter 

Peter S Janet B. 

Robert M. $ Linda C. 



Flint, 
Flint, 
Flint, 



Warren F. 
Floyd, Olive B. 
Foley, Harold W. 
Foley, John F. $ 



Bassett, Caroline C. 



Ford, David, II, £ Mary Gillingham 

Foster, J. Edward § Sara M. 

Foster, Gerald L. S Candace F. 

Frank, Robert C. 

Frank, Robert C. £ Velma S. 

Franklin, J. Thomas $ Susan B. 

Fraser, Donald C. S Joanne 

Fraser, Robert M. $ Donna A. 

Fratto, Joseph T. 

Freed, Charles § Florence W. 

French, John B. $ Deborah C. 

Friel, Patrick J. £ Charlotte A. 

Frost, Wesley T. $ October C. 

Frullo, Frank 

Fullerton, Albert L. , Jr. £ Mary S. 

Fung, Margaret 

Fusil lo, Michael G. § Concetta G. 



Gagne, Lawrence E. 5 Dorothy Q. 

Gailey, Timothy H. £ Mary Ellen 

Gallitano, Leo $ Alphonse, Trustees 

Gallitano, Alphonse L. 5 Eleanor M. 

Gannett, Ann C. 

Gargill, Robert M. £ Marian Lynn 

Garrison, David L. § Alice E. 

Garrison, John B. £ Barbara F. 

Garside, Alice H. 

Garth, John C. $ Nancy M. 

Gary, Maida E. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 12,200 


$ 844.24 




41,500 


2,871.80 




8,900 


615.88 




24,700 


1,709.24 




49,100 


3,397.72 




52,000 


3,598.40 




6,500 


449.80 




19,500 


1,349.40 




5,300 


366.76 


150 




10.38 


300 




20.76 




22,200 


1,536.24 




100 


6.92 


150 


62,200 


4,314.62 




27,100 


1,875.32 




1,300 


89.96 




20,600 


1,425.52 




52,500 


3,633.00 




30,500 


2,110.60 




28,300 


1,958.36 


100 




6.92 




58,500 


4,048.20 




48,500 


3,356.20 




24,600 


1,702.32 




24,100 


1,667.72 




16,300 


1,127.96 




33,600 


2,325.12 




59,000 


4,082.80 




54,500 


3,771.40 




24,000 


1,660.80 


400 




27.68 




37,300 


2,581.16 




4,000 


276.80 




55,000 


3,806.00 




36,600 


2,532.72 




17,000 


1,176.40 




43,700 


3,024.04 




97,000 


6,712.40 




57,100 


3,951.32 




38,200 


2,643.44 




27,000 


1,868.40 




41,900 


2,899.48 




27,600 


1,909.92 




25,600 


1,771.52 




25,900 


1,792.28 



232 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. § Esther A. 
Gavitt, A. David 5 Dorothy C. Tarbell 
Gentile, Joseph F. & Kathleen E. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. & Sareen R. 
Gheith, Mohamed A. & Dorothy A. 
Giese, Paul E. $ Lucretia H. 
Gilbert, John W. $ Josephine L. 
Gilfoy, Donald A. $ Helen B. 
Gillis, John G. 
Giurleo, James M. $ Mary C. 
Glass, John 

Glass, John B. $ Florence M. 
Gleason, Herbert P. $ Fiduciary 

Trust Co. , Trustees 
Gleason, Nancy W. J. 
Goddard, Richard B. & Karen E. 
Golden, Sylvia H. 
Goldlust, Jerry A. 
Gordon, Lester I. $ Krouk-Gordon, 

Dafna 
Gounaris, Thomas X. 
Grabill, Elliott V. 
Graddis, Richard D. 
Grady, John K. $ Elizabeth S. 
Graf, Malcolm 
Graham, Mathilda R. , III 
Grande, 'Orlando S. $ Rose P. 
Gras, Annette E. 
Gras, Ranulf W. $ Annette E. 
Grason, Rufus L. 
Grason, Rufus L. § Edna B. 
Gray, Eugene £ Constance D. 
Greaves, Allan W. $ Theresa D. 
Green, Jonathan W. & Louise L. 
Green, Laurence H. £ Margot Perkins 
Green, Norma T. 

Green, Robert T. & Catherine M. 
Greenberger, Joel S. $ Martha S. 
Gregory, Mary 

Griggs, Annette M. § Thomas I., Jr. 
Griglik, Casimir, Jr., Patrice A., 

§ Regina J., Trustees 
Grim, William M. , Jr. § Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. S Virginia B. 
Gropius, Use § Est. of Walter 
Gross, Thomas A. 0. § Judith C. F. 
Grover, C. Stuart & Gunilda G. 
Groves, Allan M. $ Camille G. 



£ Jean G. 
£ Martha L. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 21,600 


$ 1,494.72 




400 


27.68 




23,500 


1,626.20 




34,600 


2,394.32 




20,200 


1,397.84 




27,900 


1,930.68 




14,000 


968.80 




35,900 


2,484.28 




45,500 


3,148.60 




1,200 


83.04 


300 




20.76 




31,000 


2,145.20 




23,600 


1,633.12 




47,000 


3,252.40 




17,100 


1,183.32 




30,800 


2,131.36 




16,200 


1,121.04 




3,000 


207.60 




27,600 


1,909.92 




52,600 


3,639.92 




800 


55.36 




18,400 


1,273.28 




14,300 


989.56 




31,800 


2,200.56 




51,400 


3,556.88 


150 




10.38 




32,900 


2,276.68 


550 




38.06 




34,000 


2,352.80 




18,100 


1,252.52 




26,200 


1,813.04 




20 ; 400 


1,411.68 




25,500 


1,764.60 




72,500 


5,017.00 




63,200 


4,373.44 




30,000 


2,076.00 


300 




20.76 




44,500 


3,079.40 




28,900 


1,999.88 




22,100 


1,529.32 




34,300 


2,373.56 




51,300 


3,549.96 




35,700 


2,470.44 




30,300 


2,096.76 




29,400 


2,034.48 






233 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Guarino, Guy § Frances I. 
Gunaris, Theodore 5 Rheta D. 
Gurski, Richard J. 6 Harriett A. 
Gustafson, J. Kenneth § Janet L. 
Gustavson, Glenn 0. $ Morten, 

Patricia A. 
Guthke, Karl S. £ Dagmar C. 
Guy, Donald C. § M. Cynthia 
Gyftopoulos, Elias P. § Artemis E. 



Haartz, John C., Jr. § Beatrice R. 
Hachikian, Kenneth V. $ Gloria S. 
Hadcock, Mary 

Hadcock, Peter W. d, Mary G. 
Hadley, Henry H. § Janna P. 
Haessler, Herbert A. § Diane F. 
Haggerty, John S. 
Hagmann, Otto £ Katherine 
Hagopian, Charles $ Stella 
Hales, Charles A. § Mary Ann 
Hallett, Richard $ Elizabeth V. 
Hamilton, Harry A. § Bessie E. 
Hamilton, William L. § Lisa P. 
Hammond, John S. $ Nancy C. 
Hancock, John C. 
Hankey, Francis W. $ Edna J. 
Hankey, Thomas W. 
Hansen, C. Russel, 
Hanson, Adler M. k 
Hapgood, Norman, Jr. $ Ruth K. 
Hardy, Harriet L. 5 Stewart, Jane H. 
Harney, Gregory G. $ Anne W. 
Haroian, Henry § Jessie S. 
Haroutunian, Harry J. § 
Harrington, Clifford F. 
Winthrop W. , Jr. 

Nancy 

Winthrop W. 



Jr. $ Pamela W. 
Madeline A. 



Anita G. 
Jr. $ 



Jr. 



Harrington, 
Harrington, 
Harrington, Winthrop W. , Jr. £ 

Andrea L. 
Harris, Melvyn H. 5 Nancy M. 
Harris, Roger W. $ Evelyn A. 
Harrison, Henry F. 
Harrison, Henry F. 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood, Estate of Reed 
Hatsopoulos, George N. £ Daphne 



duP. 5 Elizabeth H. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 52,100 


$ 3,605.32 




16,500 


1,141.80 




46,100 


3,190.12 




24,600 


1,702.32 




37,300 


2,581.16 




31,700 


2,193.64 




40,600 


2,809.52 




79,200 


5,480.64 




42,000 


2,906.40 




15,800 


1,093.36 


200 




13.84 




27,700 


1,916.84 




35,100 


2,428.92 




50,200 


3,473.84 




30,000 


2,076.00 




31,600 


2,186.72 




24,300 


1,681.58 




46,200 


3,197.04 




14,400 


996.48 




16,900 


1,169.48 




17,500 


1,211.00 




50,400 


3,487.68 




8,000 


553.60 




43,600 


3,017.12 


75 




5.19 




18,000 


1,245.60 




29,300 


2,027.56 


150 


21,300 


1,484.34 




26,400 


1,826.88 




56,800 


3,930.56 




27,100 


1,875.32 




13,600 


941.12 




12,700 


878.84 




2,200 


152.24 


5,300 


76,400 


5,653.64 




57,500 


3,979.00 




48,000 


3,321.60 




16,800 


1,162.56 


250 




17.30 




69,100 


4,781.72 




15,800 


1,093.36 




60,800 


4,207.36 




87,100 


6,027.32 



234 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Hatsopoulos, John N. 

Hatsopoulos, John N. £ Patricia L. 

Haughey, Sylvia M. , Extrx. 

Hawes, Donald 0. d, Lillian B. 

Hawkinson, Lowell B. § Suzanne 

Haworth, George G. 5 Thelma E. 

Haytayan, Harry M. $ Katherine J. 

H. B. Knowles, Inc. 

Healy, Edward M. $ Helen T. 

Healey, Harry R. § Jeanne C. 

Heart, Frank E. $ Jane S. 

Heartt, Charlotte B. 

Heck, Mary Higbee 

Hiejn, Cornelius, Jr. $ Marion 

Helburn, Peter $ Margaret 

Heller, Edmond A., Jr. 5 Madeline M. 

Henderson, Barclay G. A. 

Henderson, Caroline G. 

Henderson, Robert S. 

Henderson, Robert S. $ Carolyn 

Hendrickson, Robert A. § Ruth Ann 

Henebry, W. Michael S Carolyn L. 

Herlin, Melvin 

Herlin, Melvin A. $ Eugenia T. 

Herman, Peter P. § Mary G. 

Herman, William F. 

Hersch, Charles $ Phyllis R. 

Herschbach, Dudley R. & Georgene B. 

Herthel, Laurence D. 

Herthel, Stephen W. $ Evelyn S. 

Hester, Leon S. § Mary B. 

Hewitt, Elizabeth C. $ George C. 

Hibben, George C. 

Hibben, George C. $ Julia K. 

Higgins, William M. , III, £ Johanna 

High, James J. f T Lois K. 

Hill, Craig C. $ Heather D. 

Hinds, Edward H. $ Edith M. 

Hingston, Joseph A. $ Gloria M. 

Hoar, Norman W. $ Shirley E. 

Hoben, Allan 5 Susan J. 

Hoch, Carole K. 

Hoch, Reimar H. H. 

Holbrow, Frederick § Florence G. 

Hoi den, Sarah C. 

Holland, Peter A. $ Marjorie L. 

Holland, Taffy K. 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. & Florence 



$ 100 



9,400 



150 



500 



1,050 



58 
43 
32 
27 
29 
22 
60 
27 
23 
32 
36 
101 
25 
44 
31 
10 

1 
33 
20 
36 

37 
20 
58 
31 
42 
10 
60 
41 
34 

43 
18 
33 
56 
80 
22 
30 
28 
18 
15 
17 
101 
22 
27 
45 



700 
700 
500 
200 
900 
600 
900 
600 
800 
700 
000 
000 
500 
300 
200 
900 

300 
100 
400 
100 

000 
100 
900 
600 
200 
900 
100 
700 
400 

800 
200 
300 
100 
900 
600 
700 
100 
100 
000 
400 
000 
400 
600 
400 



6.92 
4,062.04 
3,024.04 
2,249.00 
1,882.24 
2,069.08 
1,563.92 
4,864.76 
1,909.92 
1,646.96 
2,262.84 
2,491.20 
6,989.20 
1,764.60 
3,065.56 
2,159.04 
754.28 

10.38 

89.96 
2,290.52 
1,411.68 
2,498.12 

34.60 
2,560.40 
1,390.92 
4,075.88 
2,186.72 
2,920.24 
754.28 
4,158.92 
2,885.64 
2,380.48 

72.66 
3,030.96 
1,259.44 
2,304.36 
3,882.12 
5,598.28 
1,563.92 
2,124.44 
1,944.52 
1,252.52 
1,038.00 
1,204.08 
6,989.20 
1,550.08 
1,909.92 
3,141.68 



235 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Hollister, Walter M. S J. Sally 
Hoover, Henry B. S Lucretia J. 
Horn, Michael C. $ Helen C. 
Home, Benjamin 5 Jean Y. 
Horwitz, Murray $ Patricia F. 
Hosey, John E. $ Margaret L. 
Houghton, Est. of John J. & Lillian 
Housman, Frank M. § Ruth B. 

Elizabeth F. 

Joseph W. 

Joseph W. $ Sally E. 
Eliot, Jr. 

Robert John 5 Vera Elizabeth 
C, Jr. 



Howard, 

Howard, 

Howard, 

Hubbard 

Hughes , 

Hunsaker, Jerome 

Hunt, Merrill T. 

Huntley, Lottie D. 

Huntley, Medford E. S Blanche L. 

Hurd, Joseph F. § Nellie 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hurff, Joseph L. & Elizabeth C. 

Hutchinson, James A., Jr. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. f T Mildred B. 



Ide, Kenton J. $ Christel 

Iliescu, Nicholas & Esther 

Ingard, K. Uno 5 Doris C. 

Ireland, Christopher 

Ireland, Christopher $ Helen T. 

Irwin, Mary M. 

Ives, David 0. § Cecelia van Hollen 

Ives, Stephen G. 



Jackson, Gardner, Jr. § Sallie 
Jackson, Huson 5 Polly F. 
Jacob, Fred & Eva 
Jacobs, S. Ralph § Frances L. 
Jagger, James M. § Miriam H. 
James, Hamilton R. § Waleska E. 
Janes, G. Sargent § Ann B. 
Janovsky, Vladimir M. 
Jeffrey, Joseph H. 5 Louise A. 
Jenal, Robert L. & Irene D. 
Jenney, Charles J. $ Katrina C. 
Jennings, Charles E. $ Ann V. 
Jensen, Hoi gar J. § Grace A. 
Jerodel Realty Trust 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 28,000 


$ 1,937.60 




35,400 


2,449.68 




51,200 


3,543.04 




55,800 


3,861.36 




39,000 


2,698.80 




17,100 


1,183.32 




14,600 


1,010.32 




58,700 


4,062.04 




6,500 


449.80 


250 




17.30 




40,000 


2,768.00 




50,100 


3,466.92 




41,600 


2,878.72 




85,100 


5,888.92 




22,700 


1,570.84 




15,300 


1,058.76 




16,700 


1,155.64 




50,900 


3,522.28 




28,600 


2,048.32 




31,800 


2,200.56 




22,900 


1,584.68 




36,900 


2,553.48 




22,600 


1,563.92 




33,200 


2,297.44 




37,900 


2,622.68 


300 




20.76 




26,700 


1,847.64 




40,800 


2,823.36 




33,100 


2,290.52 


200 




13.84 




25,200 


1,743.84 




54,600 


3,778.32 




32,100 


2,221.32 




75,400 


5,217.68 




38,300 


2,650.36 




66,600 


4,608.72 




37,400 


2,588.08 




15,400 


1,065.68 




23,900 


1,653.88 




50,800 


3,515.36 




28,600 


1,979.12 




33,600 


7 325.12 




17,600 


,7.92 




6l,4no 


- 248.88 



236 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 19 77 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Jevon, Robert W. £ Virginia B. 
Jewett, Julie Davis 
John, DeWitt S Morley M. 
Johnson, Ernest L. 
Johnson, Ernest L. £ Grace M. 
Johnson, H. W. $ M. Jeannine 
Johnson, Kenneth A. $ Gladys 
Johnston, David 0. 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



33,800 
41,000 
35,000 
35,400 
42,300 
53,000 
32,200 
38,500 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



2,338.96 
2,837.20 
2,422.00 
2,449.68 
2,927.16 
3,667.60 
2,228.24 
2.664.20 



Kahn, Martin H. $ Susan B. 

Kalba, Konrad K. § Patricia A. 

Kamborian, Jacob S., Jr. 5 Nancy M. 

Kameny, Stuart M. $ Wendy W. 

Kanarek, Stephen D. $ Roberta F. 

Kano , Cyrus 

Kano, Cyrus H. § Dorothy 

Kaplan, Leonard J. § Pearl B. 

Kasperian, Karl D. § Carol 0. 

Kassner, Michael A. 5 Patricia A. 

Kaufman, Marcia W. 

Kaye, Harold § Alice S. 

Keay, Donald P. £ Mary Ann L. 

Keevil, Charles S. , Jr. 

Keevil, Charles S., Jr. $ Hannah M. 

Keily, Delbar P. £ Gertrude E. 

Kelleher, Robert J. $ Katherine J. 

Kelleher, Thomas E. 

Kellner, Joan 

Kellogg, Celina Robbins 

Kellogg, Deryn 

Kellogg, Edmund H. § Celina Robbins 

Kennedy, Albert E. 

Kennedy Land Corporation 

Kerrebrock, Jack L. § Bernice M. 

Kershaw, Thomas M. & Elizabeth M. 

Kessel, Joseph B. $ Lesley J. 

Ketchum, Anne C. 

Ketteringham, John M. $ Susan M. 

Keuper, Charles S. 

Keuper, Charles S. $ Elinore W. 

Keyes, Janet T. 

Keyes, Walter 

Kim, Samuel H. § Barbara M. 

Kimball, Joan C. F. & John R. 

Kimnach, Robert 

Kindleberger, Charles P 

King, Eleanor T. 



300 



2.950 



200 



1,350 



720 



400 



$ Betty F. 

5 Sarah M. 



45,700 
22,600 
94,300 
36,000 
26,900 

27,800 
23,400 
70,600 
22,000 
35,600 
25,400 
36,300 

37,200 
17,600 
40,400 
16,100 
14,300 
101,100 

100 
3,800 
65,400 
42,600 
54,600 
30,400 
31,400 
27,200 

74,300 
24,700 

39,400 
34,900 
29,300 
33,400 
32.600 



3,162.44 
1,563.92 
6,525.56 
2,491.20 
1,861.48 
20.76 
1,923.76 
1,619.28 
4,885.52 
1,522.40 
2,463.52 
1,757.68 
2,511.96 

204.14 
2,574.24 
1,217.92 
2,795.68 
1,114.12 

989.56 

6,996.12 

13.84 

6.92 

262.96 
4,525.68 
3,041.34 
3,778.32 
2,103.68 
2,172.88 
1,882.24 
49.82 
5,141.56 
1,709.24 
27.68 
2,726.48 
2,415.08 
2,027.56 
2,311.28 
2.255.92 



237 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



King, William A. 5 Elizabeth P. 

King, William Tappan § Jeanne M. 

Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kistiakowsky, Irma E. 

Kirkpatrick, Margaret M. 

Kitses, Steven J. § Mary H. 

Kj el lander, Mary C. 

Kling, John W. $ Louise H. 

Klobuchar, John A. § N. Maribeth 

Klotz, Robert E. § Joan L. 

Koehler, Edward F. $ Margaret M. 

Kolligian, Zoe 

Kolodny, Myer Z. § M. Lillian 

Koopman, Bernard 0. § Jane B. 

Korhonen, Edwin J. 5 Miriam 

Komfeld, George R. £ Hulen S. 

Koumantzelis, Arthur G. § Vaia T. 

Kramer, Ruth L. 

Kruse, Jurgen M. $ Alice S. 

Kubik, Charles S. 

Kuhns , Roger 

Kuhns, Roger J. £ Roberta B. 

Kumar , An i 1 

Kurzina, Peter S. £ Stephanie 0. 

Kusleika, Steven 

Kusleika, Steven $ Louise C. 

Kwasniak, Walter F. 



Lackner-Graybiel, James R. $ Ann M, 
Lahey, Heirs of James 
Lahnstein, Richard K. 
Lambie, Ann H. 

Landry, Christopher K. § G. Barrie 
Lane, J. Frank § Kathleen F. 
Lang, Richard E. § Betty Lee 
Langton, William G. § Jane G. 
Lankhorst, Bernice C. § Greeley, 

James M. 
Lankhorst, Beverly P. 
Larson, John B. £ Mafalda M. 
Laurence, Kenneth § 
Lavine, Jerome M. § 
Lavrakas, Apostle £ 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Lawson, John R. § 
Lay, Kenneth W. § 



Lynda Wilson 
Mary C. 
Fofo 



§ Wanda E. 
Rebecca S. 
Virginia A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 19,200 


$ 1,328.64 




72,700 


5,030.84 




22,000 


1,522.40 




46,600 


3,224.72 




34,900 


2,415.08 




37,400 


2,588.08 




30,600 


2,117.52 




24,400 


1,688.48 




29,200 


2,020.64 




31,900 


2,207.48 




31,300 


2,165.96 




86,800 


6,006.56 




31,400 


2,172.88 




26,700 


1,847.64 




22,500 


1,557.00 




21,900 


1,515.48 




57,200 


3,958.24 




35,100 


2,428.92 




22,800 


1,577.76 




33,100 


2,290.52 


100 




6.92 




49,200 


3,404.64 




43,200 


2,989.44 




25,100 


1,736.92 


350 




24.22 




23,600 


1,633.12 




28,800 


1,992.96 




28,200 


1,951.44 




5,400 


373.68 




14,800 


1,024.16 




32,700 


2,262.84 




61,800 


4,276.56 




56,300 


3,895.96 




44,900 


3,107.08 




43,400 


3.003.28 




33,700 


2,332.04 




26,200 


1,813.04 




23,800 


1,646.96 




22,300 


1,543.16 




29,800 


2,062.16 




10,700 


740.44 


1 , 350 




93.42 




34,800 


2,408.16 




41,800 


2,892.56 




41,800 


2,892.56 



238 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 19 77 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 36,100 


$ 2,498.12 




37,500 


2,595.00 




4,200 


290.64 




37,800 


2,615.76 




27,200 


1,882.24 




44,200 


3,058.64 




26,700 


1,847.64 




20,600 


1,425.52 




50,300 


3,480.76 




32,800 


2,269.76 




41,700 


2,885.64 




36,500 


2,525.80 




26,200 


1,813.04 




27,000 


1,868.40 




28,800 


1,992.96 




41,400 


2,864.88 


300 




20.76 




15,700 


1,086.44 


200 




13.84 




25,700 


1,778.44 


300 




20.76 




42,200 


2,920.24 


750 




51.90 




49,500 


3,425.40 




31,900 


2,207.48 




49,600 


3,432.32 




24,400 


1,688.48 




37,500 


2,595.00 




27,400 


1,896.08 




1,504,600 


104,118.32 




11,700 


809.64 


1,000 




69.20 


1,550 




107.26 


750 




51.90 




80,800 


5,591.36 




2,800 


193.76 




35,400 


2,449.68 




29,300 


2,027.56 




50,900 


3,522.28 



Lazaridis, Lazarus J. § Suzanne 

Leape, Martha P. 

Leathern, Evelyn K. 

Leaver, Barbara S. 

Lee, Richard S. 

Lee, Shih Ying £ Lena Y. 

Lee, Thomas H. £ Barbara F. 

Leger, Mary E. , Trustee 

Leggat, Thomas E. $ Barbara B. 

Leinwand, Charles M. 

Lemander, William C. $ Emily K. 

Lemire, Robert A. £ Virginia M. 

Lenington, Robert L. § Carolyn J. 

Lennon, Elin £ Est. of James V. 

Leonard, S. Edward £ Marilyn J. 

Leshick, Joseph J. 5 Margaret F. 

Leslie, Paul 

Leslie, Paul M. $ Elizabeth M. 

Levey, Alice 

Levey, Harold A., Jr. $ Ruth P. 

Levi, David F. 

Levin, Alvin S Betty 

Levin, Betty 

Lewis, Marion S., Trustee 

Lewis, William R. § Dawn C. 

Li, Yao T. 5 Nancy T. 

Liddick, Harold S. 5 Virginia D. 

Liepins, Atis A. £ Diana 

Light, Calen D., Jr. $ Lois McClure 

Lincoln Homes Corporation 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corporation 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln Plumbing $ Heating Co. 

Lindsay, Franklin A. & Margot C. 

Lindstrom, Paul T. § Anita M. 

Lingos, John G., Adm. 

Linnell, Zenos M. § Geraldine 

Linnell, Zenos M. $ Kathleen G. 

Linnell, Zenos M. & Kathleen G., 
Zimmerman, Robert M. $ Zock, 
Robert, Trs., § Caswell, John Ross 
$ Carol B. 

Linstrom, Peter J. $ Maybelle L. 

Lippman, Anne F. $ Richard J., Trs. 

Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. § Elizabeth A. 

Littlefield, Paul D. 5 Emmy N. 



500 


34 


.60 


23,300 


1,612 


.36 


24,300 


1,681, 


.56 


34.600 


2,394, 


.32 


32,700 


2,262, 


.84 


37,900 


2,622, 


.68 



239 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Lo, Steven Shih Ting $ Yi-Chao M. 
Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. $ Irene P. 
Loewenstein, Davida G. 
Loewenstein, Paul § Sophie 
Loud, John F. § Mary L. 
Loud, Robert L. § Gwyneth E. 
Loughlin, Leona K. 
Lovering, Emily B. 
Lovering, Talbot D. § Emily B. 
Low, Stephen R. $ Barbara B. 
Ludden, John M. £ Susan F. 
Lunn, Paul W. $ Rose F. 
Luse, Alan J. $ Therese M. 
Lustwerk, Ferdinand $ Ingeborg J. 
Lutkins, David R. § Nancy S. 
Lutnicki, Victor A. $ Harriet H. 
Lynde, Donald £ Pamela Anne 
Lyon, Ruth 
Lyons, Richard K. $ Joyce W. 



250 



21,200 
55,700 
36,400 
33,500 
49,600 
16,100 
16,900 

30,300 
35,000 
35,000 
21,200 
11,400 
29,300 
32,800 
52,400 
17,000 
17,000 
28,600 



1,467. 

3,854. 

2,518. 

2,318. 

3,432. 
114. 
169. 
17, 
096. 
422. 
422, 
467. 
788. 
027, 
269, 
626, 
176. 



1,176 
1,979 



Corinne C. 
$ Mary M. 
Elizabeth M. 



MacDonald, Winslow H. § June R. 

Maclnnis, Hazel A. $ Est. of Daniel A, 

Mackenzie, Ethel L. 

Mackenzie, Murdoch J. $ Adeline A. 

Maclaurin, Elfriede C. 

Maclaurin, Ellen 

Mac Lean, H. Arnold £ 

MacLeod, Edward, Jr. 

MacLeod, George A. § 

MacLeod, Josephine F. 

MacMahon, D'Arcy G. § Lucia T. 

MacNeil, Bruce M. 

MacNeil, Ronald L. £j Wendy Snyder 

Mahan, Russell P. $ Anastasia 

Mahoney, Gerald J. £ Jeanne M. 

Mahoney, John D. $ Eleanor D. 

Maier, Emanuel £ Sylvia 

Malloy, David C. 



L. 



Malloy, 


Matthew J. 


$ lone W. 




Malloy, 


Robert M. 






Malloy, 


Robert M. , 


Jr. £ Carol 


E. 


Malloy, 


Robert M. , 


Jr. § David 


C. 


Malloy, 


Terese A. 






Maloney 


, Bernard C 


, Jr. § Janet 


Maloney 


, Richard G 


, Trustee 




Man ion, 


David R. £ 


Noel L. 




Mannarino, Joseph 


j Florence A 





28,800 
17,200 
36,300 
24,000 
47,600 
34,000 
27,200 
10,000 
21,500 
16,000 
61,600 
33,600 
16,000 
55,400 
23,800 
39,600 
41,700 
13,300 

2,700 
55,000 
22,000 

9,300 
17,200 

7,300 
80,100 
30,400 
15,700 



1,992 
1,190 
2,511 
1,660 
3,293 
2,352 
1,882 

692 
1,487 
1,107 
4,262 
2,325 
1,107 
3,833 
1,646. 
2,740. 
2,885. 

920. 

186. 
3,806. 
1,522. 

643. 
1,190. 

505. 
5,542. 
2,103. 
1,086. 



.96 
.24 
.96 
.80 
.92 
.80 
.24 
.00 
.80 
.20 
.72 
.12 
.20 
.68 
.96 
.32 
.64 
.36 
,84 
,00 
,40 
.56 
,24 
,16 
,92 
,68 
44 



240 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Manning, Catherine L. 

Mannix, William J., Jr. 

Mansfield, James S. § Sarah C. 

Manzelli, Donald 

Manzelli, Donald M. § Janet G. 

Manzelli, John 5 Dorothy 

Mar, James W. § Edith 

Marcks, Ronald H. § Barbara W. 

Marden, John A., et als, Trustees 

Maroni, Kevin J., Jaman M. § Jacques R. 

Marsh, Margaret B. 

Marsh, Paul E. § Margaret B. 

Martin, Robert T. & Margaret M. 

Martini, William F. § Virginia J. 

Mason, Max, Jr. § Betty M. 

Mason, Richard K. § Ann E. 

Mason, William C. & Virginia 

Massachusetts Audubon Society, Inc. 

Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 

Massachusetts Port Authority 

Mathieu, Alix 

Mattes, Sara 

Maurer, David L. & Marks, Joyce 

Maxwell, Ralph E. & Phyllis B. 

May, James W. , Jr. S Linda C. 

Mayfield, Gale S. & Glover B. 

Mayfield, Glover B. $ Gale S. 

Mayo, Stephen K. £ Post, Marda A. 

McClennen, Alan & Louise H. 

McConchie, James H. 

McCune, William J. 5 Elizabeth J. 

McCurdy, Michael C. $ Deborah L. 

McDonald, Robert 

McEnness, Harold F. 

McGarry, Anne W. 

McGrath, Mary F. 

McHugh, James F., Ill, $ Katherine S. 

McHugh, John E. 

Mclnnis, Donald G. 

McKennan, Alice W. 

McKnight, David B. $ Ernest T. , d/b/a 

McKnight's Nursery & Landscape 

Service 
McKnight, David B. £ Eleanor J. 
McKnight, Ernest T. , Ex. 
McLean, John L. £ Ann A. 
McLellan, John W. $ Julia C. 
McLeod, James § Ethel B. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 16,700 


$ 1,155.64 




1,800 


124.56 




34,000 


2,352.80 


350 




24.22 




55,100 


3,812.92 




20,100 


1,390.92 




28,200 


1,951.44 




39,600 


2,740.32 




1,400 


96.88 




44,700 


3,093.24 


300 




20.76 




48,000 


3,321.60 




29,800 


2,062.16 




29,500 


2,041.40 




27,600 


1,909.92 




21,800 


1,508.56 




38,700 


2,678.04 




80,000 


5,536.00 




388,800 


26,904.96 




83,900 


5,805.88 




37,700 


2,608.84 


300 




20.76 




16,300 


1,127.96 




39,900 


2,761.08 




30,900 


2,138.28 


350 




24.22 




42,600 


2,947.92 




36,300 


2,511.96 




56,600 


3,916.72 




59,900 


4,145.08 




73,800 


5,106.96 




25,600 


1,771.52 


150 




10.38 




5,700 


394.44 




45,500 


3,148.60 




43,200 


2,989.44 




33,700 


2,332.04 




6,700 


463.64 


1,800 


28,000 


2,062.16 




38,800 


2,684.96 




4,700 


325.24 




19,700 


1,363.24 




18,300 


1,266.36 




18,500 


1,280.20 




14,300 


989.56 




9,300 


643.56 



241 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



$ Janice H. 

$ Thacher, Ralph 

E. 5 Mary J. 



Trs, 



McMahon, Howard $ Lucile N. 

McMorrow, Maureen C. § Richard H., Jr. 

McNulty, Thomas F. $ Mary S. 

McPherson, William W. $ Kathryn L. 

McWade, Paul E. & Lucille C. 

Meade, Edmund J. d, Eleanor H. 

Mead, Varnum R. 

Mead, Varnum R. 

Mead, Varnum R. 

Mecsas, Michael 

Meeks, M. Littleton § Louise V. 

Meenan, Peter § Marion Morey 

Melanson, Leonard J. £ Mary 

Melchior, Siri 

Menino, Mary M. 

Meriam, Ellin F. 

Meriam, Richard S. S Alice G. 

Merrill, Vincent N. § Anne S. 

Merry, Glen W. § Susan B. 

Messina, Elena C. 

Messina, Grazia $ Est. of Jaspare 

Meyer, Carol H. 

Meyer, James W. £ Carol H. 

Michener, Martin C. £ Susannah H. 

Mi lender, Sumner N. $ Edith M. 

Millard, Donald A., Jr. § Catherine C. 

Millard, Donald A. $ Jeannette D. 

Millard, John D. § Jane L. 

Millard, Susan £ David K. 

Miller, Harold T. $ Marcheta A. 

Mintz, Norbett L. § Sophie B. 

Mix, Thomas R. § Helen 

Mixon, Scott I. & Isabel 

Mlavsky, Abraham I. § Sally A. 

Mohr, John J. $ Jean F. 

Moller, Cynthia 

Montgomery, Maurice M., Jr. § 

Florence V. 
Moore, Murvale H. , Jr. $ NeGarre H. 
Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. & Dorothy H. 
Moor, Edgar J. £ Joan R. 
Moot, John $ Ellen 
Morency, Alfred 
Morency, Mary V. § Alfred J. 
Morette, Paul J. 

Morette, Walter J. $ Gertrude L. 
Morey, Kenneth $ Ruth I. 



100 



150 



185 



100 
275 



I 99,600 
50,700 
65,600 
35,900 
44,700 
40,300 

24,700 
21,000 
36,300 
35,500 
45,200 
15,800 

23,800 
24,400 
6,300 
25,000 
65,600 
57,900 
22,900 

34,600 
10,100 
47,900 
73,300 
59,300 
41,700 
42,800 
48,100 
42,800 
32,300 
29,900 
60,600 
100,000 
17,200 

16,500 
31,800 
100 
26,500 
47,600 



54,200 

8,700 

33,700 

16,800 



$ 6,892.32 
3,508.44 
4,539.52 
2,484.28 
3,093.24 
2,788.76 
6.92 
1,709.24 
1,453.20 
2,511.96 
2,456.60 
3,127.84 
1,093.36 
10.38 
1,646.96 
1,688.48 

435.96 
1,730.00 
4,539.52 
4,006.68 
1,584.68 
12.80 
2,394.32 

698.92 
3,314.68 
5,072.36 
4,103.56 
2,885.64 
2,961.76 
3,328.52 
2,961.76 
2,235.16 
2,069.08 
4,193.92 
6,920.00 
1,190.24 

1,141.80 
2,200.56 

6.92 
1,833.80 
3,293.92 

6.92 

19.03 

3,750.64 

602.04 

2,332.04 

1,162.56 



242 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate Aggregate Tax on 

Value of Value of Real and 

Personal Real Personal 

Estate Estate Estate 



Morgan, Henry M. $ Gwen G. 
Morganti, Victor M. $ Helga 
Morris, Lloyd § Katherine 
Morris, Beatrice M. 
Morrissey, J. Neil 
Morrissey, J. Neil 5 Mary F. 
Morse, Thomas R. 

Morse, William H. § Marguerite D. 
Morse, William H. $ Patricia A. 
Morton, Peter W. 
Moss, Leonard G. § Frances S. 
Moss, Rodney E. § Elizabeth T. 
Moss, Sidney $ Silke V. 
Mount, Wayne D. $ Claire L. 
Mozzi, Robert L. £ Ruth M. 
Mrakovich, David V. $ Gertrude A. 
Mrugala, Anthony J. 
Mrugala, Frances T. 
Mudge, Jeffrey M. § Seim, Christine 
Mueller, Robert K. $ Jane K. 
Mukhitarian, Samuel § Stephanie 
Munroe, William C. , Jr. $ Mary W. 
Murphy, Persis S. $ Est. of Cyrus W. 
Murphy, Daniel J. 5 Louise C. 
Murphy, Edward W. $ Marjorie A. 
Murphy, Mary B. 
Murphy, Mina Dorothea 
Murphy, William F. £ Ruth M. 
Murphy, William J., Jr. § M. Louise 
Murray, John B. £ Sheila M. 
Mutschler, Louis H. $ Phyllis 
Myer, C. Randolph, III, £ Jean D. 
Myers, John A., Jr. § Lucy B. 
Mygatt, Samuel G. $ Hall, Susan M. 
Myles, Theresa Anne S J. Richard 



500 



525 



43,000 
44,200 
21,200 
10,300 

21,500 
38,100 
20,900 
65,100 
26,900 
26,600 
17,300 
34,800 
30,600 
35,700 
34,500 
23,500 
1,900 
28,000 
54,700 
18,400 
27,200 
22,100 
16,500 
26,900 
21,200 
16,800 
43,900 
100 
12,200 
34,200 
39,400 
22,400 
31,100 
35.600 



2,975.60 
3,058.64 
1,467.04 

712.76 
34.60 
1,487.80 
2,636.52 
1,446.28 
4,504.92 
1,861.48 
1,840.72 
1,197.16 
2,408.16 
2,117.52 
2,470.44 
2,387.40 
1,662.53 

131.48 
1,937.60 
3,785.24 
1,273.28 
1,882.24 
1,529.32 
1,141.80 
1,861.48 
1,467.04 
1,162.56 
3,037.88 
6.92 

844.24 
2,366.64 
2,726.48 
1,550.08 
2,152.12 
2,463.52 



Nabih, Ismail 

Naiman, Mark L. 5 Adeline L. 

Najjar, Edward G. § Gail T. 

Nardone, Anthony B. $ Nancy E. 

Natoli, Donald J. £ Lois M. 

Nault, Wilson S. § Marjorie A. 

Nawoichik, Elsie W. , Adm. 

Neeley, Scott § Joan 

Neiley, Alexander H. 

Neiley, Alexander H. £ Diana B. 

Neily, Clark M. $ Diane D. 



100 



38,000 
22,600 
45,800 
52,100 
27,500 
46,000 
46,900 
78,500 

30,100 
22,700 



2,629.60 
1,563.92 
3,169.36 
3,605.32 
1,903.00 
3,183.20 
3,245.48 
5,432.20 
6.92 
2,082.92 
1,570.84 



243 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Nelson, Albert E. £ Marjorie E. 
Nelson, Erik J. 
Nelson, Jean R. 
Nessen, E. Richard 
Nesto, Bruno R. $ Eugenia R. 
Neumann, Sylvia B. S Est. of Ernest P. 
Newbold, Thomas 

Newcombe, Charles A. 5 Lawrence S. 
Newell, Lena M. 
New England Tel. S Tel. Co. 
Newman, Daisy- 
Newman, Robert B. & Mary Shaw 
Newton, George C. , Jr. S Suzanne R. 
Newton, Harland B. £ Ethel A. 
Nickerson, Elizabeth Perkins 
Nicolaides, Paris § Aliki 
Niles, Muriel L. 
Niles, Robert L. $ Virginia M. 
Nockles, William A. $ Diane F. 
Nunes, Geoffrey $ Clare H. 



Oak, Ingul Ivan $ 
O'Brien, Daniel F 



Setsuko S. 



O'Brien, 
O'Brien, 
O'Brien, 



O'Connor 
O'Connor 



Daniel F. £ Mary T. 

Gloria 

John H. 

O'Brien, John H. £ Barbara M. 
O'Brien, Joseph A. $ Virginia B. 
John T. 

John T. 5 Maud Dorothy 
Ogden, David 

Ogilvie, Gordon H. £ Florence E. 
Old County Realty Trust 
Oliver, James A. § Fern S. 
Olivieri, James § Dorothy M. 
O'Loughlin, John M. § Joanne R. 
Olsen, Kenneth H. & Elva-Liisa A. 
O'Neil, David 

O'Neill, Edward J. $ Teresa 
Onigman, Marc P. $ Maureen 
Order of Saint Anne 
Osborne, Gordon 
O'Rourke, Paul K. $ Marilyn J. 
Outten, Nancy K. 
Owen, Carleton W. 
Owen, Charles J. § Mary Lee 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




27,500 


1,903.00 


200 




13.84 




38,400 


2,657.28 




50,700 


3,508.44 




32,900 


2,276.68 




42,900 


2,968.68 




46,300 


3,203.96 




33,900 


2,345.88 




18,500 


1,280.20 


1,439,200 




99,592.64 




21,500 


1,487.80 




150,000 


10,380.00 




33,800 


2,338.96 




28,900 


1,999.88 




55,800 


3,861.36 




54,200 


3,750.64 




25,400 


1,757.68 




27,600 


1,909.92 




17,600 


1,217.92 




47,300 


3,273.16 




37,300 


2,581.16 


200 




13.84 




25,700 


1,778.44 


150 




10.38 




11,600 


802.72 




34,600 


2,394.32 




26,400 


1,826.88 


4,000 




276.80 




52,700 


3,646.84 


550 


29,600 


2,086.38 




29,100 


2,013.72 




9,300 


643.56 




34,900 


2,415.08 




20,700 


1,432.44 




34,400 


2,380.48 




63,100 


4,366.52 




11,400 


788.88 




35,800 


2,477.36 




19,000 


1,314.80 




15,500 


1,072.60 


2,400 


64,700 


4,643.32 




26,500 


1,833.80 




28,300 


1,958.36 




8,700 


602.04 




23,100 


1,598.52 



244 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Page, 
Page, 
Page, 
Page, 
Page, 



Panetta, 
Panetta, 
Panetta, 
Panetta, 



Paddock, Louis E. £ Ann E. 
Page, Elizabeth J. 

Elliott F. 5 Emily R. 

Lot B. £ Patricia H. 

Milton S. 

Milton S. dt Roberta M. 

Stanley W. § Elisabeth H. 
Paglierani, Laurence A. § Pamela 
Paine, Jason C. 
Paine, Mary C. 
Paino, Dolores M. 
Paino, John 

Palmer, Attelio A. $ Kathryne 
Palmer, Eleanor M. 
Palmer, Waldo 
Panetta, Frank £ James 

James J. £ Rosemary D. 
Franklin £ Theresa J. 
Mary N. 

Salvatore § Rita 
Pantazelos, Peter G. $ Hytho H. 
Pappas, Mrs. Louis T. 
Paquette, Margaret 
Parish, Edward C. , Jr. $ Joan DeF. 
Parke, Nathan G., IV, 5 Ann T. 
Parker, Jackson 
Parker, Jackson B 
Parla, John J. 

Pastoriza, James J. $ Ruth B. 
Patrick, Loomis £ Martha S. 
Patton, Martha N. 
Paul, Louise C. 
Payne, H. Morse § 
Payne, Roger S. $ 
Payne, William T. 
Pearmain, W. Robert 
Peavy, Leopold, Jr. 
Peck, Mildred E. 
Peirce, Isabel T. 
Peloquin, Roy J. 
Perera, Guido R. 
Perry, A. Wade $ 



S Jacqueline S. 



Helen M. 
Katherine B. 
S Mary H. 

& Claire P. 

$ Elizabeth J. 



Jr. £ Joan Hulme 
Rachel 
Marilyn H. 



Perry, John R. $ 

Perry, Laura 

Perry, Richard 5 

Pertzoff, Olga S 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. $ Mary E. 



Nancy G. 

Est. of Constantin 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value o* 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 25,600 


$ 1,771.52 




29,500 


2,041.40 




28,800 


1,992.96 




41,300 


2,857.96 


550 




38.06 




23,400 


1,619.28 




19,900 


1,377.08 




22,200 


1,536.24 




300 


20.76 


250 


21,800 


1,525.86 




33,300 


2,304.36 


100 




6.92 




21,200 


1,467.04 




28,300 


1,958.36 


100 




6.92 




3,100 


214.52 




21,700 


1,501.64 




30,000 


2,076.00 




25,900 


1,792.28 




15,700 


1,086.44 




54,800 


3,792.16 


1,500 




103.80 




2,900 


200.68 




34,000 


2,352.80 




41,100 


2,844.12 


7,550 




522.46 




26,300 


1,819.96 




42,600 


2,947.92 




54,300 


3,757.56 




75,600 


5,231.52 




15,200 


1,051.84 




22,700 


1,570.84 




31,300 


2,165.96 




29,600 


2,048.32 




43,200 


2,989.44 




73,700 


5,100.04 




71,600 


4,954.72 




17,800 


1,231.76 




23,500 


1,626.20 




18,700 


1,294.04 




62,500 


4,325.00 




56,000 


3,875.20 




35,900 


2,484.28 


100 




6.92 




49,400 


3,418.48 




141,700 


9,805.64 




50,800 


3,515.36 




28,800 


1,992.96 



245 



VALUATION LIST, JULY L, 1977 



Peterson, Mary E. 

Pettit, Julie P. 

Phelps, Robert H. $ Elizabeth K. 

Phillips, Charlotte T. 

Phillips, Donald 

Phillips Academy, Trs. of 

Pianka, Walter E. S Ann C. 

Piccinini, Helen M. 

Pickett, Robert C. £ Annette M. 

Pickman, Anthony 

Pickman, Anthony 5 Alice L. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot £ Dora Redway 

Pike, John A. £ Mary S. 

Pino, Frank J. § Beverly Ann 

Pippen, Judith 

Plant, Paul R. f T Madeline Leonard 

Piatt, Anthony C. £ Martha P. 

Plouffe, Francis A. 

Plouffe, Francis A. S Gerene S. 

Podsen, Robert E. $ Doris A. 

Polumbaum, Theodore S. § Nina 

Porter, James F. $ Marjorie F. 

Postel, Sholem 

Poulos, Charles L. § Sophie 

Poulos, Theodore C. 

Powers, Francis L. , Jr. § Helen E. 

Powning, Carolyn W. 

Pratt, Nancy A. 

Preston, Jean W. 

Priest, Anne P. 

Primak, John £ Lena 

Privitera, Salvatore S. $ Doris S. 

Protopapa, Sejfi 

Przbylski, John L. £ Jean M. 

Puffer, Richard F., Jr. £ Margaret G. 

Pugh, Alexander L. , III, $ Julia S. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 450 


$ 6,200 


$ 460.18 




25,100 


1,736.92 




35,600 


2,463.52 




64,300 


4,449.56 


150 




10.38 




3,000 


207.60 




38,800 


2,684.96 




35,900 


2,484.28 




49,200 


3,404.64 


300 




20.76 




85,300 


5,902.76 




30,800 


2,131.36 




64,300 


4,449.56 




20,100 


1,390.92 




17,200 


1,190.24 




31,700 


2,193.64 




30,500 


2,110.60 


150 




10.38 




25,100 


1,736.92 




53,300 


3,688.36 




36,300 


2,511.96 




31,100 


2,152.12 




21,400 


1,480.88 




30,800 


2,131.36 


400 




27.68 




15,400 


1,065.68 




36,800 


2,546.56 




2,500 


173.00 




103,500 


7,162.20 




38,400 


2,657.28 




37,900 


2,622.68 




55,800 


3,861.36 




66,700 


4,615.64 




5,000 


346.00 




43,700 


3,024.04 




28,800 


1,992.96 



Quarton, Gardner § Frances 



11,400 



788, 



Radasch, Donald 

Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. & Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. § Ellen A. 

Raker, Anne M. 

Rand, Est. of Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. , Jr. 



150 



23,700 


1,640.04 


2,900 


200.68 


28,500 


1,972.20 


29,100 


2,013.72 


47,900 


3,314.68 


63,000 


4,359.60 




10.38 



246 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Rand, William M. £ Priscilla 

Rando, Thomas 

Ranney, Donald D. $ Patricia A. 

Rapperport, Eugene J. 5 Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. § Dorothy H. 

Rasco, Austin £ Diane C. 

Ravesi, Josephine A. 

Rawson, Edward B. $ Nancy B. 

Ray, Kenneth J. § Marjorie L. 

Redmond, Paul J. 

Redmond, Rosemary Keough 

Reece, Richard C. § Susan W. 

Reed, Abijah $ Susan P. 

Reid, Cynthia J. 

Reid, Penelope 

Reservoir Nursing Home, Inc. 

Resnick, Charles H. $ Marie J. 

Rhedom Realty Corporation 

Ricci, Louis, Fred and Charles 

Ricci, Russell J. $ Carla W. 

Rice, James F., Jr. $ Barbara A. 

Richardson, Frederick C. § Ingemarie 

Riker, E. William & Evelyn N. 

Riley, Allston § Marion H. 

Risch, Martin D. 

Ritchie, James R. 

Ritsher, John A. $ Cynthia W. 

Rizzo, William J., Jr. £ Jane L. 

Robbins, Roland W. § Geraldine 

Robbins, Bonita M. 



Martha Jean 
& Shirley M. 



Roberts, Paul 0. § 

Roberts, Richard I, 

Robey, Harriet 

Robinson, Dora A. 

Roehr, George L. $ Marcia A. 

Rogers, A. Lewis 

Rogers, Alfred P. § Louise E. 

Rogers, Alfred P. § George E. , Trs. 

Rogers, David E. § Susan B. 

Rogers, Harriet J. 

Rogers, Maybelle, Winifred § Evelyn 

Rogerson, Grace S. § Est. of Henry S, 

Rolfe, Edward § Stephanie 

Rollins, J. Leslie 

Rollins, James L. , Jr. £ Norma 

Rood, Jane 

Rooney, Edward D. 

Rose, James § Glenys 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 37,000 


$ 2,560.40 


500 


55,600 


3,882.12 




27,700 


1,916.84 




28,500 


1,972.20 




29,700 


2,055.24 




30,200 


2,089.84 




28,900 


1,999.88 




34,400 


2,380.48 




20,500 


1,418.60 


400 




27.68 




33,100 


2,290.52 




38,400 


2,657.28 




3,800 


262.96 




28,600 


1,979.12 


200 




13.84 




100 


6.92 




46,900 


3,245.48 




42,800 


2,961.76 




16,200 


1,121.00 




18,900 


1,307.88 




19,900 


1,377.08 




29,700 


2,055.24 




30,400 


2,103.68 




8,000 


553.60 




24,900 


1,723.08 




5,500 


380.60 




64,900 


4,491.08 




23,900 


1,653.88 




18,200 


1,259.44 


250 




17.30 




56,500 


3,909.80 




47,600 


3,293.92 




36,700 


2,539.64 




16,000 


1,107.20 




78,600 


5,439.12 




48,900 


3,383.88 




41,000 


2,837.20 




16,000 


1,107.20 




3,800 


262.96 




29,600 


2,048.32 




38,500 


2,664.20 




21,500 


1,487.80 




35,800 


2,477.36 




4,300 


297.56 




31,400 


2,172.88 




20,600 


1,425.52 




17,500 


1,211.00 




26,300 


1,819.96 



247 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Rosen, Joseph 5 Pearl S. 

Rosen, Paul § Annette 

Rosenblum, John W. $ Carolyn J. 

Rosenwald, Harold £ Betty Booth 

Ross, Paul F. $ Rita 

Ross, William C. § Marian L. 

Rossiter, Selina G. 

Rossoni, John P. $ Paola M. 

Rossoni, Paola M. 

Row, Ronald V. 

Row, Ronald V. S Jane 

Rowe, Lawrence L. £ Mildred 

Rowe, Standi sh S. 

Roy, Eugene U. 

Roy, Shirley I. 

Rubissow, George John 

Rudnick, Mitchell K. & Rosalie A. 

Rugo, Henry J. § Faith W. 

Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 

Russell, Marie Hamilton 

Russell, William B. $ Anne H. 

Russes, Richard 

Russes, Richard P. § Mary D. 

Ruyle, Sheila B. 

Ryan, Alice B. 

Ryan, Frank A. 

Ryan, Helen E. 

Ryan, Helen § Est. of James J. 

Ryan, William H. & Mary B. , Trs. 

Ryan, William F. & Helen M. 

Ryer, Russell E. $ Margaret C. 



Sabbag, Arthur $ Evelyn J. 
Salmon, Walter J. $ Marjorie B. 
Sandy Pond Trust 
Santa, Cecelia F. 
Sartori, Louis R. 
Sartori, Louis R. $ Ruth M. 
Satterfield, Charles N. $ Anne I 
Savage, Orrin T. $ Helen A. 
Sawtell, Clement C. § Adelaide ] 
Sayre, Woodrow W. § Edith W. 
Schatzberg, Alan F. $ Nancy S. 
Schechter, Joel R., Trustee 
Scheff, Benson H. § Betty Jane 
Scheft, William A. 5 Gertrude W. 
Scheuer, Harry 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 45,900 


$ 3,176.28 




21,900 


1,515.48 




21,400 


1,480.88 




55,900 


3,868.28 




50,000 


3,460.00 




33,100 


2,290.52 




31,900 


2,207.48 




51,200 


3,543.04 




21,500 


1,487.80 


40 




2.76 




35,500 


2,456.60 




5,600 


387.52 




39,500 


2,733.40 




16,500 


1,141.80 




15,600 


1,079.52 




28,100 


1,944.52 




43,700 


3,024.04 




48,000 


3,321.60 




378,600 


26,199.12 




41,300 


2,857.96 




67,300 


4,657.16 


150 




10.38 




19,300 


1,335.56 




20,900 


1,446.28 




24,700 


1,709.24 




13,900 


961.88 




14,100 


975.72 




21,300 


1,473.96 




84,700 


5,861.24 




38,500 


2,664.20 




28,200 


1,951.44 




18,100 


1,252.52 




40,300 


2,788.76 




85,000 


5,882.00 




15,000 


1,038.00 




600 


41.52 




41,700 


2,885.64 




41,800 


2,892.56 




27,900 


1,930.68 




35,100 


2,428.92 




5,100 


352.92 




33,800 


2,338.96 




76,700 


5,307.64 




38,300 


2,650.36 




35,600 


2,463.52 




32,900 


2,276.68 



248 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Schildbach, Muriel 

Schliemann, Peter C. § Diane Page 

Schroeder, Janet Gregg 

Scholz, Mary A. 

Schumacher, John 

Schwann, William § Aire-Maija 

Schwartz, Judah L. $ Ellen A. 

Schwarz, Francis C. § Ruth L. 

Scott, Bruce R. 

Scott, Bruce R. 5 Anne M. 

Scott, Eleanor B. 

Seaver, John 

Seaver, John D. § Millicent 

Sedgwick, Harold Bend 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. $ Eleanor R. 

Seeckts, E. William £ Eleanor R. § 

Stout, Caroline W. 
Seeley, George W. 5 Susan A. 
Segal, Robert M. $ Sharlee M. 
Selland, James 0. £ Maija 
Semerjian, Evan Y. £ Barbara N. 
Seville, Alfred R. S Joan E. 
Sexton, Maurice J. § Martha S. 
Shaffer, William A. & Ellen D. 
Shambaugh, Joan 0. 
Shamsai, Javid 
Shansky, David $ Nettie 
Shapiro, David $ Esther 
Shapiro, Robert W. f T Wera 
Sharpe, John G. § Jeanne B. 
Sheehan, Gerald G. $ Brigid M. 
Shea, William J. $ Margaret T. 
Sheer, Richard B. 5 Sara Jane 
Sheldon, Mary W. 

Shenton, Robert & Elizabeth Owen 
Shepherd, G. Dudley 
Shepherd, Gardner D. £ Mary Macy 
Sheridan, Mary Ann 
Shevenell, John P., Jr. £ Lucy F. 
Shuman, Mark D. £ Lena M. 
Silverstein, Fred P. § Mary J. 
Simms, Margaret J. 
Simonds, Anthony J. 
Simonds, Lena J. 
Simourian, John § Lillian M. 
Sisson, John H. § Barbara B. 
Skinner, Louis T. $ Hope J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 27,300 


$ 1,889.16 




28,900 


1,999.88 




21,500 


1,487.80 




50,000 


3,460.00 




100 


6.92 




40,100 


2,774.92 




32,800 


2,269.76 




59,000 


4,082.80 


400 




27.68 




60,900 


4,214.28 




24,400 


1,688.48 


1,000 




69.20 




41,800 


2,892.56 




35,900 


2,484.28 




28,200 


1,951.44 




34,200 


2,366.64 




800 


55.36 




22,000 


1,522.40 




33,300 


2,304.36 




16,900 


1,169.48 




40,400 


2,795.68 




30,900 


2,138.28 




18,800 


1,300.96 




20,700 


1,432.44 




26,400 


1,826.88 




5,300 


366.76 




38,200 


2,643.44 




40,700 


2,816.44 




26,300 


1,819.96 




24,400 


1,688.48 




26,800 


1,854.56 




21,100 


1,460.12 




87,500 


6,055.00 




23,600 


1,633.12 




51,400 


3,556.88 


750 




51.90 




45,500 


3,148.60 




5,300 


366 . 76 




33,600 


2,325.12 




38,200 


2,643.44 




39,000 


2,698.80 




18,300 


1,266.36 




18,800 


1,300.96 




1,900 


131.48 




42,500 


2,941.00 




48,400 


3,349.28 




113,000 


7,819.60 



249 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Slayter, Henry S. § Elizabeth M. 

Slavin, Gerald D. 

Smith, Alan B. S, Marjorie B. 

Smith, Arthur D. § Jean C. 

Smith, Carl D. $ Florence C. 

Smith, Colin L. M. $ Diana Dennison 

Smith, Converse B. $ Nellie L. 

Smith, Doris Hall, Trustee 

Smith, Eleanor W. 

Smith, Harold Dean $ Elizabeth H. 

Smith, Peter S. d, Linda J. 

Smith, Steven 

Smith, Sumner 

Smith, Theodore R. $ Vicki S. 

Smith, William J. $ Barbara J. 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw § Sawera 

Smyth, Robert R. $ Adella C. 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Howard § Elizabeth J. 

Snelling, Jessica 

Snelling, John R. 

Snelling, John R. $ Jacquelyn H. 

Snelling, Norman J. £ Carolyn R. 

Snider, Greta W. 

Snow, Robert C. 

Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities 
Solar, Barry $ Judith 
Solbes, Albert $ Pamela Sholes 
Solman, Fred J., Ill, $ Claire F. 
Solomon, Arthur P. $ Marilyn N. 
Spencer, Henry W. § Marguerite G. 
Spencer, Lynne M. 
Spindler, James W. £ Mary B. 
Spock, Michael $ Judith W. 
Spooner, Frederick C. § Sarah W. 
Spooner, Lily T. 

Spreadbury, Peter E. § Roberta I. 
Squibb, Mildred G. 
Squire, James R. $ Barbara L. 
Stam, Allan C, Jr. $ Kathleen 
Standish, Myles, Jr. $ Hester T. 
Stankard, Charles E., Jr. $ Jean C. 
Stanzler, Alan L. § Margaret 
Stason, William B. § Susan B. 
Stathos, Charles A. $ Margaret M. 
Stebbins Realty Trust 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 25,400 


$ 1,757.68 




18,900 


1,307.88 




46,500 


3,217.80 




30,500 


2,110.60 




23,000 


1,591.60 




33,000 


2,283.60 




48,500 


3,356.20 




31,400 


2,172.88 




53,300 


3,688.36 




26,800 


1,854.56 




100 


6.92 


150 




10.38 




74,300 


5,141.56 




18,800 


1,300.96 




21,600 


1,494.72 




32,000 


2,214.40 




32,300 


2,235.16 




17,200 


1,190.24 




20,600 


1,425.52 




43,100 


2,982.52 




24,900 


1,723.08 




33,400 


2,311.28 




25,500 


1,764.60 




7,100 


491.32 




30,700 


2,124.44 




19,200 


1,328.64 




49,100 


3,397.72 




27,500 


1,903.00 




14,900 


1,031.08 




29,900 


2,069.08 




54,400 


3,764.48 


150 




10.38 




38,100 


2,636.52 




29,700 


2,055.24 




17,000 


1,176.40 




23,000 


1,591.60 




44,000 


3,044.80 




9,900 


685.08 




53,500 


3,702.20 




53,700 


3,716.04 




29,600 


2,048.32 




40,000 


2,768.00 




30,400 


2,103.68 




53,400 


3,695.28 




55,500 


3,840.60 




21,600 


1,494.72 



250 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



$ Sarah W. 

Patricia A. 
§ Joan L. 
Jr. $ Ruth L. 



Stecher, Robert W. $ Barbara M. 
Steczynski, John M. $ Est. of 

Jennepher T. M. 
Steele's Auto Body Repair, Inc. 
Steinhilper, Frank A. £ Anne C. 
Stevens, Edmund, Jr. § Shari R. 
Stevenson, Howard H. 
Stevenson, John 
Stevenson, John P. § 
Stevenson, Philip D. 
Stewart, Francis J., 
Stewart, Henry A. £ Diane W. 
Stimmell, David H. & Grace B. 
Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 
Street, Earle B. § Janet H. 
Striker, William W. $ Marjorie B. 
Struble, Dennis D. £ Claudia A. 
Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. 
Sturgis, Alanson H. , Jr. § Anne H. 
Sugar, Peter C. $ Elizabeth R. 
Sullivan, Gladys G. 
Sussman, Joseph $ Henri -Ann 
Sutherland, Robert L. £ Ann F. 
Swan, Edmund 

Swan, Edmund § Eleanor G. 
Sweeney, Carl F., Jr. £ Alice P. 
Swett, Paul F., Jr. $ Joan D. 
Swift, Phyllis C. 
Swift, William N. & Phyllis C. 
Sykes, David F. $ Margaret P. 
Sylvia, Lawrence N. 



Taschioglou, Ellen 

Taschioglou, Kemon P. $ Rhoda K. 

Tat lock, Richard $ Jane F. 

Taunton -Rigby, Roger 

Taunt on -Rigby, Roger $ Alison 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick B. 5 Lex H. 

Taylor, W. Royce 

Taylor, W. Royce § Dorothy V. 

Teabo, Prince 

Teabo, Prince C. $ Elizabeth T. 

Tead, Eleanor K. 

Telling, Irving $ Jane Cushman 

Tenneco, Inc. 

Tennican, Michael L. $ Catherine W. 



$ 49,500 $ 3,425.40 



200 



150 



250 

100 
400 

150 
5,000 

300 
700 

261,900 



19,900 


1,377.08 


38,000 


2,643.44 


51,400 


3,556.88 


53,000 


3,667.60 


132,900 


9,196.68 




10.38 


36,900 


2,553.48 


56,800 


3,930.56 


29,600 


2,048.32 


15,100 


1,044.92 


17,300 


1,197.16 


15,400 


1,065.68 


41,800 


2,892.56 


20,100 


1,390.92 


21,300 


1,473.96 




17.30 


22,700 


1,570.84 


23,400 


1,619.28 


17,000 


1,176.40 


47,500 


3,287.00 


30,900 


2,138.28 




6.92 


25,100 


1,736.92 


40,500 


2,802.60 


33,300 


2,304.36 




27.68 


35,900 


2,484.28 


29,500 


2,041.40 


27,300 


1,889.16 




10.38 


36,100 


2,498.12 


36,000 


2,491.20 




346.00 


27,900 


1,930.68 


47,100 


3,259.32 


33,800 


2,338.96 




20.76 


35,700 


2,470.44 




48.44 


17,100 


1,183.32 


28,000 


1,937.60 


36,200 


2,505.04 


1,000 


18,192.68 


55,500 


3,840.60 



251 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Terrell, John H. & Mary H. 

Tetreault, Claire F. 

Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. S Laura 

Thomas, George W. , Jr. S Jane C. 

Thompson, Donald J. 

Thompson, G. Brooks 

Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. 5 Arlene 

Thompson, Harry, Trustee 

Thompson, Lawrence E. £ Dorothy A. 

Thomson, Anne Pearmain 

Three S Realty Trust 

Thurston, Edna W. 

Thurow, Lester C. £ Pfuetze, Gretchen 

Tilburg, William E. 

Tinder, Glenn § Gloria 

Tingey, William J., Jr. § Ruth V. 

Tingley, Frederick M. $ Dilla G. 

Titus, William A. 

Todd, C. Lee, Eveleth R. , John § 

Est. of David 
Todd, Conrad H. 
Todd, Harriet B. 
Toksoz, M. Nafi £ Helena 
Toler, Albert 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tomasic, Michael 

Tomasic, Michael G. £ Beverly F. 
Tong, Pin $ Siang Wen Chao 
Torode, Herbert L. 
Torode, Herbert L. § Lorraine S. 
Torode, Wendy 
Torri, Edward F. & Myra M. 
Torti, Maurice L. , Jr. $ Nancy H. 
Touborg, Jens N. F. § Margaret B. 
Towfigh, Keivan, Trustee 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracey, Robert J. § Caroline J. 
Tracey 1 s Service Station, Inc. 
Travers, Paul § Bernice 
Trevelyan, Eoin W. $ J. Ann 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. § Mary G. 
Tucker, Janet L. 

Tunnel 1, Raymond W. £ Suzanne D. 
Turano, Anthony J. § Florence T. 
Turner, Charles F. $ Winifred A. 
Turner, James R. $ Mildred B. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 19,200 


$ 1,328.64 




33,700 


2,332.04 




66,400 


4,594.88 




54,700 


3,785.24 




17,400 


1,204.08 




48,900 


3,383.88 


650 




44.98 




25,500 


1,764.60 




58,600 


4,055.12 




47,100 


3,259.32 




19,200 


1,328.64 




128,200 


8,871.44 




28,600 


1,979.12 




49,600 


3,432.32 




36,000 


2,491.20 




38,900 


2,691.88 


300 


38,500 


2,684.96 




24,000 


1,660.80 


775 


13,200 


967.07 




15,900 


1,100.28 




24,600 


1,702.32 


150 




10.38 




6,400 


442.88 


1,225 




84.77 




20,600 


1,425.52 


350 




24.22 




52,900 


3,660.68 




23,500 


1,626.20 


450 




31.14 




18,200 


1,259.44 


200 




13.84 




29,400 


2,034.48 




31,900 


2,207.48 




126,400 


8,746.88 




10,400 


719.68 




26,500 


1,833.80 




32,200 


2,228.24 




54,900 


3,799.08 


850 




58.82 




37,900 


2,622.68 




32,700 


2,262.84 




18,000 


1,245.60 




400 


27.64 




36,400 


2,518.88 




400 


27.68 




15,400 


\ , 065 . 68 




25 , 900 


1,792.28 



252 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Turner, Mildred B. 

Turner, Vernon D. § Merrylees K, 

Tyler, Ethel A., Est. of 

Tyler, Priscilla D. 

Tyler, Heirs of Watson 



$ 



150 



31,200 
10,400 
33,900 
11,100 



10.68 
2,159.04 

719.68 
2,345.88 

768.12 



Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis, trustee 
U. S. Dynamics Realty Trust 



20,200 

25,300 

3.200 



1,397.84 

1,750.76 

221.44 



Valley Pond Realty Trust 
VanBuren, Harold S., Jr. S Barrett 

Beatrice H. 
VanLeer, Hans 

VanLeer, Hans L. £ Est. of Mary K. 
VanLeer, R. Karl $ Rachel D. 
VanLeer, R. Karl, Trustee 
VanWart, Walter L. £ Stephenia 
Venier, Ettore P. & Mary E. 
Vercollone, Edmund S. $ Julia 
Vitale, Joseph A. 
Vockel, Virginia 
Von Mertens, Peter B. 



250 



3,300 

78,100 
1,400 
51,500 
25,100 
43,900 
20,000 
61,900 
23,300 
28,000 
17,800 
21,100 



228.36 

5,404.52 
96.88 
3,563.80 
1,754.22 
3,037.88 
1,384.00 
4,283.48 
1,612.36 
1,937.60 
1,231.76 
1,460.12 



Wadsworth, Charles Y. £ Virginia 

Wales, Betty R. 

Wales, R. Langdon 

Wales, R. Langdon 5 Ruth W. 

Wales, Roger S. $ Patricia R. 

Walker, John F. $ Joan McK. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Walkey, Frederick P. § Ruth 

Wallwork, Edwin N. $ Janice C. 

Walter, Charlton M. S Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. $ Julie 

Wang, An § Lorraine C. 

Wang, Chiu-Chen § Pauline C. 

Wang, Frederick A. 

Warburg, Jonathan F. § Andrea W. 

Ward, Howard H. £ Eleanor D. 

Ward, Jane L. 

Ward, Walter B. $ Sophie E. 

Ward, Walter B., Jr. § Marie L. 

Warner, Charles D. K. § Patricia 



150 



54,800 
35,900 

37,800 
24,100 
42,000 
41,700 
38,300 
27,700 
48,300 
17,400 
90,600 
44,100 
21,500 
6,000 
67,700 
21,300 
18,700 
17,100 
66.400 



3,792.16 
2,484.28 
10.38 
2,615.76 
1,667.72 
2,906.40 
2,885.64 
2,650.36 
1,916.84 
3,342.36 
1,204.08 
6,269.52 
3,051.72 
1,487.80 
415.20 
4,684.84 
1,473.96 
1,294.04 
1,183.32 
4,594.88 



253 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Warner, Estate of Henrietta S. 

Warner, John Burton § Barbara K. 

Watts Realty Corporation 

Waugh, John S. 

Webster, David 5 Winifred W. 

Weckstein, Richard $ Muriel 

Weibel, Eugene A. 5 Wilma 

Weingarten, Joseph § Celeste 

Weiss, Alfred D. & Anne K. 

Welch, Vernon F. $ Leatrice June 

Weller, Maria F. 

Wells, Katherine W. , Extrx. 

Wenger, Jeffrey J. & Alice H. 

Wengren, Margaret L. 

Wessell, William R. , Jr. S Roberta A. 

Westcott, Vernon C. $ Mary Alice 

Whalen, William B. $ Mary E. 

Whatley, Robert 

What ley, Robert Boyd $ Kay A. 

Wheelock, Susan K. 

White, John R. $ Gina R. 

White, Katharine S. $ John W. 

White, Robert E. § Marion J. 

Whitman, Lawrence W. $ Joanne S. 

Whitman, Ross § Virginia R. 

Wilbor, John S. $ Dorothy B. 

Wiley, David S. $ Mary P. 

Wilfert, Fred J. § Eleanor M. 

Willemin, Julian V. 

Willemin, Julian V. § Jane A. 

Williams, Edwin L., Jr. § Ruth D. 

Williams, Gregory P. $ Janis L. 

Williams, William G. £ Jane C. 

Williamson, Elizabeth R. 

Willmann, Werner S. $ Margaret 

Wilson, Donald H. 5 Cheryl L. 

Wilson, Eleanor L. 

Wilson, Mary Ann 

Wilson, Robert A. 5 Judith A. 

Winchell, Gordon D. 

Winchell, Gordon D. $ 

Winchell, Gordon D. $ 

Trustees 
Winchell, Gordon D. § Keevil, 

Charles S. , Jr. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. S Amy Jane 



M. 



Enid M. 

Love, Dorothy, 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 52,100 


$ 3,605.32 




35,100 


2,428.92 




3,900 


269.88 




41,800 


2,892.56 




54,100 


3,743.72 




41,300 


2,857.96 




6,400 


442.88 




38,300 


2,650.36 




50,800 


3,515.36 




17,500 


1,211.00 




40,400 


2,795.68 




45,600 


3,155.52 




4,200 


290.64 




70,200 


4,857.84 




30,700 


2,124.44 




22,400 


1,550.08 




16,200 


1,121.04 


1,150 




79.58 




20,400 


1,411.68 




57,900 


4,006.68 




48,100 


3,328.52 




59,000 


4,082.80 




28,500 


1,972.20 




42,000 


2,906.40 




65,700 


4,546.44 




31,500 


2,179.80 




40,800 


2,823.36 




21,600 


1,494.72 


150 




10.38 




22,100 


1,529.32 




32,500 


2,249.00 




3,800 


262.96 




23,100 


1,598.52 




15,500 


1,072.60 




28,700 


1,986.04 




31,400 


2,172.88 




28,900 


1,999.88 




19,000 


1,314.80 




10,300 


712.76 


4,250 


2,800 


487.86 




61,500 


4,255.80 



17,300 1,197.16 



300 



46,600 



21,600 



3,224.72 

20.76 

1,494.72 



254 






VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1977 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 100 


$ 


$ 6.92 




29,600 


2,048.32 


300 




20.76 




61,500 


4,255.80 




53,100 


3,674.52 




60,000 


4,152.00 


100 




6.92 




33,300 


2,304.36 




25,900 


1,792.28 




53,200 


3,681.44 




25,900 


1,792.28 




19,000 


1,314.80 




5,400 


373.68 




45,700 


3,162.44 




37,700 


2,608.84 




25,200 


1,743.84 




29,800 


2,062.16 




50,300 


3,480.76 




40,300 


2,788.76 




25,700 


1,778.44 


150 




10.38 




29,000 


2,006.80 




32,100 


2,221.32 




2,000 


138.40 




38,300 


2,650.36 




15,000 


1,038.00 




25,900 


1,792.28 




35,600 


2,463.52 




34,800 


2,408.16 




20,000 


1,384.00 




200 


13.84 




47,700 


3,300.84 


150 




10.38 




19,500 


1,349.40 



$ Joan W. 
§ Mary Lou 
Emily T. 
Jr. 5 Nancy S. 



Wood. 

Wood, 

Wood, Robert C. 

Wood, Robert M. 

Wood, Ronald F, 



Winship, Lee 

Winship, Lee C. S Joyce L. 
Winship, Thomas 
Winship, Thomas § Elizabeth C. 
Winthrop, John £ Barzun, Roger, Trs. 
Witherby, Thomas H. § Marianne J. A. 
Wo f ford, John G. 
Wofford, John G. 
Wollmar, Dick J. 
Woo, Way Dong £ 
Wood, George A. , 
Hilve V. 
Ralph V., Jr. £ Virginia S. 

S Margaret B. 

$ June W. 

5 Wendy L. 
Woodington, W. Gordon £ Mary L. 
Work, Frederic C. T. & Marilyn N. L. 
Worsham, Jack L. § Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. $ Elizabeth C. 
Wright, Malor 

Wright, Malor S Ruth Vaughn 
Wu, Pei-Rin $ Susan 



Yagjian, Jacob $ Inez 
Yeuell, Kay M. $ Suzanne R. 
Yore, George P. $ Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold M. § Ann B. 
Young, Lee A. £ Jane C. 
Young, Lucy J. 



Zevin, Anne 

Zimmerman, Herbert E. & Pearl S. 

Zimmerman, Robert M. $ Zock, Robert A. 

Trustees 
Zoqwyn, Peter H., Jr. 
Zuelke, Laurence W. $ Nancy J. 






255 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Archer desCognets 
Virginia M. Niles 
William B. Russell 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 $ 108.66 

Interest income 1/1/77-6/30/77 367.59 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 3.60 

Withdrawn from savings 983.53 

1,463.38 
Deduct : 

Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 973.75 976.75 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 486.63 



Cash 5 Securities at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham $ 486.63 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 968.22 

3,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 3,005.99 

2,000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 11/15/80 1,950.47 

3,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 3,013.46 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 1,000.00 

2,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

1,000 Pacific Tel. § Tel. Co. 4 3/4% 2/15/88 1,005.15 

2,000 Gen'l Telephone Co. of Calif. 4 1/8% 3/1/88 2,008.06 

1,000 Pacific Gas $ Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,001.30 

1,000 Southern Calif. Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/10/90 1,002.36 

4,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

2,000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 2,003.68 

1,000 American Tel. 5 Tel. 8 5/8% 2/1/07 978.75 

1,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 973.75 



$25,270.32 



256 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 

Interest income received 1/1/77-6/30/77 

Withdrawn from savings 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 



Payments per order of Trustees: 
Pocket Mime Theatre 
Joanne Hamlin 
Other lecture assistance 
Printing § postage 



Deposited in savings bank 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Safe deposit box rent 

Purchase of 2000 Comm. Edison 8% 8/1/01 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 



miums 


$ 


1,479.82 

535.89 

1,967.05 

4.43 
3,987.19 


$ 400.00 






450.00 






25.00 






119.25 






994.25 






500.00 






55.09 






4.00 






1,947.50 




3,500.84 




$ 


486.35 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham Bank 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

3,000 American Tel. 5 Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 

1,000 Virginia Electric § Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 

2,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 

3,000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/87 

1,-000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 

1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 3/4% 11/15/87 

1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3 7/8% 1/1/88 

3,000 Pacific Tel. $ Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

3,000 New England Power Co. 4 5/8% 11/1/91 

3,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.95% 6/10/92 

3,000 Atchison Topeka $ Santa Fe RR 4% 1995 

2,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 



Accumulated income 
General Principal 



$ 486.35 
625.42 
2,491.98 
3,010.42 
2,913.75 
1,012.00 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
956.25 
1,005.82 
1,000.00 
3,050.10 
1,002.36 
3,024.79 
2,970.00 
3,000.00 
1,947.50 

$ 33,496.74 

643.45 

32,853.29 

$33,496.74 



257 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 
Income received 1/1/77-6/30/77: 

Dividends 

Interest 

General appeal 

Donation - Memory of 
T. K. Worthington 

Old Town Hall Corp. 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Withdrawn from savings 



Payments per order of Trustees: 
Balance of 1976-77 grants 
5,000 Commonwealth Ed. 8% 8/1/01 
Safe deposit box rent 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 





$ 3,555.86 


462.42 




201.45 




35.00 




10.00 




2,000.00 


2,708.87 




.69 




3,667.64 




9,933.06 


1,500.00 




4,868.75 




4.00 




201.45 


6,574.20 



Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 3,358.86 



Cash and Secu ri ties at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton- Waltham Bank $ 3,358.86 

Provident Institution for Savings 11,572.25 

1,000 Pacific Gas 5 Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,001.30 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 1,002.36 

5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 4,987.50 

6,000 Southern N. E. Telephone Co. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 6,010.37 

80 shs. Exxon Corp. 3,016.85 

100 shs. Northern Indiana Public Service Co. 2,973.63 

5,000 Commonwealth Edison 8% 8/1/01 4,868.75 

$ 38,791.87 

Reserve for 77-78 grants $ 9,600.00 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 1,000.00 

Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 1,770.00 

Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 5,005.00 

General Fund 21,416.87 

$38,791.87 



258 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 
Income received 1/1/77-6/30/77: 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

George G. $ Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 



$ 502.61 

4.22 

31.79 

70.62 

350.00 

28.75 



Donations: 

Francis Gleason 
Lincoln Minute Men 



130.00 

100.00 

1,217.99 



Payments: 

Safe deposit box rent 

Purchase of books, DeNormandie Room 

Deposited in savings banks 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 



3.00 
268.91 
350.00 

$ 596.08 



Codman Fund 

Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsw orth $ 
Murray P. Farnsworth Fund 
Boston 5<fr Savings Bank 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 
Boston Si Savings Bank 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fun d 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 
1,000 S. N. E. Tel. 

5 3/4% '96 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 



Income on 






Deposit 


Principal 
$ 474.59 


Total 


; 160.28 


$ 634.87 


79.98 


1,000.00 


1,079.98 


224.54 


500.00 


724.54 


--- 


158.89 


158.89 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 





114.57 


114.57 



George Russell Library Fund 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 



92.65 



415.74 



508.39 



Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 
1,000 Fed. Nat'l Mortgage 

6.40% '87 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 



175.61 



956.25 
968.06 



956.25 
1,143.67 



259 



George G. Tarbell Library Fund 
1,000 S. New England Tel. 

5 3/4% '96 
1,000 So. Bell Tel. 4% »83 
1,000 Western Mass. Elec. 

4 3/8% »87 

Union Warren Sav. Bank 

George G. § Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 
10,000 Duquesne Light 7% '99 
Boston 5<fr Savings Bank 

C. Edgar § Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 
1,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage 

6.40% '87 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 

Lincoln Library Fund 

1,000 S. New England Tel. 

5 3/4% '96 

Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 



Income on 






Deposit 


Principal 


Total 




$ 1,000.00 


$ 1,000.00 


--- 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 





1,000.00 


1,000.00 


80.43 


138.38 


218.81 




10,000.00 


10,000.00 


2,781.12 


75.00 


2,856.12 




956.25 


956.25 


98.46 


273.52 


371.98 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


74.12 





74.12 



Bay Bank /Newt on Walt ham 
Fund Income 
- Donations: 
Cannon 
Bolt 

Lincoln Minute Men 
Gleason 



119.41 



$3,886.60 



46.67 

200.00 

100.00 

130.00 

$21,507.92 



46.67 

200.00 

100.00 

130.00 

$25,394.52 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Interest income received 1/1/77-6/30/77 
Paid to Town of Lincoln 



Bank Deposits at 6/30/ 77 



32.49 
32.49 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



$ 722.00 

495.52 

$ 1,217.52 



260 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 
Interest income 1/1/77-6/30/77 
Withdrawn from savings 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



; 49 


11 


34 


78 


75 


00 



158.89 



Less bank interest allowed to accumulate $ 14.78 

Grants to or on behalf of certain people 111 .00 125.78 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 33.11 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham Bank $ 33.11 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 488.28 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

$ 1,521.39 

Accumulated income 296.34 

Principal 1,225.05 



$ 1,521.39 



Cash balance at January 1, 1977 $ 19.64 

Cash balance at June 30, 1977 $ 19.64 

Bank Deposits at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton-Waltham Bank $ 19.64 

Concord Cooperative Bank 2,396.00 

$ 2,415.64 



Accumulated income $ 1,180.64 

Principal 1,235.00 

$ 2,415.64 



261 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 



Cash balance January 1, 1977 
Income received 1/1/77-6/30/77: 

- Interest, net $2,578.20 

- Elsie Pierce Trust 1,561.95 

- Use of Pierce House 2,830.00 
Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



$ 6,241.94 



6,970.15 

3.30 

13,215.39 



Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Medical assistance to needy townspeople 
60+ Clinic 

Pierce House Expenses: 
Repairs $ maintenance 
Supplies § furnishings 
Caretaker compensation 
Gas (Heating) 
Other utilities 
Mowing, Pierce Park Grounds 
Rubbish removal 
Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Deposited in savings banks 
Safe deposit box rent 
Advertisement for caretaker 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 

Cash balance, June 30, 1977 



423.00 
370.00 

261.32 
239.00 

1,150.00 

2,919.03 
342.51 
720.00 
332.00 
120.75 

3,000.00 
18.00 
78.40 

9,974.01 

$ 3,241.38 



Cash and Securities at June 30 , 1977 

Restricted as to principal: 

Union Warren Savings Bank 

10,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2% 2/1/82 
21,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 
10,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 
10,000 So. California Edison Co. 7 1/8% 1/15/94 
10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 

5,000 So. N. E. Telephone 5 3/4% 11/1/96 
10,000 Florida Power & Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 
10,000 Pacific Gas $ Electric Co. 4 5/8% 6/1/97 
10,000 American Tel. 5 Tel. 4 3/4% 6/1/98 
10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 
10,000 Southwestern Bell Telephone 8 1/4% 3/1/14 



$ 874.80 

9,975.00 

20,081.25 

9,900.00 

10,000.00 

9,975.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

9,503.50 

$115,309.55 



262 



Unrestricted as to principal and interest: 

Bay Bank/Newton- Waltham $ 3,241.38 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 11,870.72 

Provident Institution for Savings 6,443.20 
5,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 

4 1/4% 1/15/79 4,904.56 

5,000 American Tel. & Tel. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 4,856.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric 4 1/8% 10/1/96 1,012.10 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 2,913.75 

4,000 Federal National Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 3,825.00 

5,000 Pacific Tel. 5 Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 5,058.07 

2,000 Federal National Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 1,980.00 

$161,414.33 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 
1/1/77-6/30/77 



Cash Account 

Balance, January 1, 1977 $ 1,179.55 

Interest income 1/1/77-6/30/77 92.93 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums .76 

Deduct - Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

- Bank interest allowed to accumulate 8.69 

- Deposited in savings bank 1,000.00 1,011.69 

$ 261.55 



Cash and Securities at June 30, 1977 

Bay Bank/Newton- Waltham Bank $ 261.55 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,639.58 

1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 1,000.00 

1,000 American Tel. 5 Tel. Co. 4 5/8% 4/1/85 1,000.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric & Power 4 1/8% 10/1/86 1,012.00 

1,000 Southern Cal. Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 1,002.36 

1,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 990.00 

$ 6,905.49 



Accumulated income $ 1,693.27 

Principal 5,212.22 

$ 6,905.49 



263 



14 



b *